Gorrddd

Gorrddd

Joined on Nov 24, 2011

Comments

Total: 9, showing: 1 – 9
On Fujifilm X-Pro1 preview (756 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rowland Scherman: It would have been a lot better if the focal length of the lenses offered by Fuji had been ACTUALLY 18, 35, and 60mm. 27, 53, and 91 changes the game somewhat. What were they thinking? It almost sounds as if that were trying to pull a fast one.

27 is standard wide angle with minimum distortion correction. 24 is considered extended wide angle with significantly more barrel and pin cushion distortion to be corrected. With more correction the less native image quality overall. They will offer wider angle lenses with processor correction but at a marginal loss of image quality. Everything has a trade off.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2012 at 02:19 UTC
On Buyer's Guide: Enthusiast raw-shooting compact cameras article (286 comments in total)
In reply to:

dasar: well, I do not see the canon S100 in this group. If the IQ of G12 is good, what will the one of S100 be ?

Barney,

I just finished reading the review on the S100 and found it to be excellent. It resolves the lens decentering issue. People can understand it before throwing down on an otherwise faithful iteration of a great little camera line.

Based upon the scoring criteria I felt that if the camera was re-reviewed by a fresh set of eyes it would actually get slightly higher marks in the area of "Features", which is the second most important category in DPR's scoring process. The S100 feature set is one of its strongest suits and I really feel that the tabulation process did not account for all that it offers. Along those lines I would have expected a score much closer to 75.

Although the S100 is obviously not a gold award winner, I believe that it is a stronger silver award winner than what it was given credit for. I don't fault DPR for that since you guys put an enormous amount of effort into these reviews... to the point of exhaustion.

Gordon

Direct link | Posted on Dec 23, 2011 at 07:36 UTC
On First Impressions: Using the Canon PowerShot S100 article (182 comments in total)

Barney,

I just finished reading the review on the S100 and found it to be excellent. It resolves the lens decentering issue. People can understand it before throwing down on an otherwise faithful iteration of a great little camera line.

Based upon the scoring criteria I felt that if the camera was re-reviewed by a fresh set of eyes it would actually get slightly higher marks in the area of "Features", which is the second most important category in DPR's scoring process. The S100 feature set is one of its strongest suits and I really feel that the tabulation process did not account for all that it offers. Along those lines I would have expected a score much closer to 75.

Although the S100 is obviously not a gold award winner, I believe that it is a stronger silver award winner than what it was given credit for. I don't fault DPR for that since you guys put an enormous amount of effort into these reviews... to the point of exhaustion.

Gordon

Direct link | Posted on Dec 23, 2011 at 07:24 UTC as 13th comment
On First Impressions: Using the Canon PowerShot S100 article (182 comments in total)

Having downloaded and checked the sample DPR images above, they appear excellent in my opinion, for a point and shoot. Both the leaf and the fruit are relatively closeup shots and this camera does well in those situations. The Seattle Needle is an object. At 100% crop, this distance shot is fairly sharp, just starting to soften with only the slightest tinge of grain. It is acceptable for a P&S in my opinion. Post processig can correct all of this.

However, DPR needs to include a sample images of foliage at a distance to really get down to some serious real world resolution. Clustered small leaves at a distance is the most difficult thing for this camera to resolve. For landscape photography, the S100 leaves something to be desired. Professional equipment is required to capture the detail and resolution of landscape at a distance.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 12, 2011 at 16:43 UTC as 18th comment
On First Impressions: Using the Canon PowerShot S100 article (182 comments in total)

I purchased an S100 a month ago. It is not a bad camera. At wide angle, out to 60% crop remains sharp. At 80% crop both leaves and twigs begin to soften but objects appear sharp. At 100% crop, leaves and twigs are soft and objects are just beginning to soften. A full frame 21mp Canon 5D Mk II is sharp out to 100% crop but starts to soften after 120% crop. I haven't done enough with the zoom except with marco and up close shots. I recently did a pine cone on a white pine at 3 feet with about 50% zoom (17mm) and the results were ouitstanding. The needles and pine cone texture were exceptionally crisp and clean. What ever the offcenter lens issue is, it may only effect the position of the lens components at a particular zoom factor. Focus doesn't seem to be an issue on my camera. I may have a good camera but I suspect it also has the issue since there may only be one factory for this market.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 11, 2011 at 16:35 UTC as 20th comment
On Preview:canons100 (323 comments in total)

I did shrink them down to the same physical size as the S95 and the two are more comparable. The major difference is that the S95 seems to have a bit better RAW contrast out of the camera. That seems to make it look a bit sharper than the S100. However, here is the deal. Although the S95 has more contrast and sharpness in appearance, the S100 actually has more detail from the 12.1mp CMOS. Detail, more than absolute sharpness is what is important in post processing since the detail can be brought out and made to look sharp. You can not bring out fine detail if it is not already there. Look at the facial shading of the statue and currency face photos. You will see more of it in the S100.

Posted on Nov 28, 2011 at 18:48 UTC as 9th comment | 2 replies
On Preview:canons100 (323 comments in total)

I checked out the new DPReview studio control shots in some detail and there appears to be something wrong. The image captions of the S100 appear almost as large as a full frame caption. This should not be because the physical image size has not changed that much between the S95 and the S100. They both use a 1/1.7" sensor. The only difference is that the S95 is a CCD with 10mp and the S100 is a CMOS with 12.1mp. The additional 2.1mp should not have increased the physical caption by that much. If you were to shrink down the S100 captions to the size of the S95 captions, the slight softness in the S100 captions would be much more comparable with the S95.

Posted on Nov 27, 2011 at 02:19 UTC as 10th comment
On Preview:canons100 (323 comments in total)

Having read a number of posts I am surprised that no one, including the review author, has properly defined the Canon S90/S95/S100's primary application. These cameras are true compact imaging devices... not semi-compacts. This means they are trim enough to go with you all of the time while still offering superior image performance. These cameras are not really meant for enthusiasts who want all the bells and whistles. Those guys want chunky... a full plate for their money's worth.

Many of the pros, who are weary of lugging all their gear everywhere they go, want a level of performance that they can easily carry with them while still maintaining post processing excellence, without the added encomberance. That is what these cameras are really all about. They are a serious departure from the 1/2.7" mini sensor compacts that internally bled and spattered where ever they went. These may look the same but are up to four times the price without all the internal hemorrhaging.

Posted on Nov 25, 2011 at 02:09 UTC as 12th comment
On Preview:canons100 (323 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tat3r: Want to know you all/y'alls opinion on something:

I'm about to purchase the S100, but I'm also considering the Lumix DMC-GF2 - which is a 4/3's camera. I know they are different, but I'm looking for something compact to semi-compact that takes great photos with a reasonable amount of automation and yet still giving me the ability to be creative with aperture and/or exposure settings.

So, any opinions: Canon S100 vs Lumix DMC-GF2 ??

Honestly, either you are looking for a compact pocket camera or you are not. All 4/3'rds cameras have a removable lens on account of their sensor size and no matter how compact, the lens sticks out and will not go into your pocket without the bulge.

Even pocket cameras do best in some kind of case on the belt. A camera in your pocket just isn't the best place for it if you are serious about carrying it on a regular basis.

This is where the S90/S95/S100's shine. If you must have a larger sensor, then you must be willing to put up with the protruding lens. This lens will get rubbed, pressed, and pulled on by surfaces that would normally only glance your side. It will still be an incomberance.

That is the reason for the S90/S95/S100 series of compact cameras, according to a professional photographer friend who just doesn't want to haul all his gear around ALL the time. He has an S90 and gets good enough quality for post processing of very high quality professional looking images.

Posted on Nov 25, 2011 at 01:43 UTC
Total: 9, showing: 1 – 9