Tony Sleep

Tony Sleep

Lives in United Kingdom London, United Kingdom
Works as a Freelance editorial photographer
Has a website at www.tonysleep.co.uk
Joined on Nov 12, 2003
About me:

I am - since 1980 - a pro editorial photographer.

I am also one of the EPUK moderators/directors - www.epuk.org and the admin of EPUK sites www.copyrightaction.com and www.photorights.org

Comments

Total: 14, showing: 1 – 14
On Resurrecting a WWII optic with scraps and a 3D printer article (59 comments in total)
In reply to:

HL48: From what I remember of an article about this lens (about 15 years ago, perhaps in Sky and Telelscope). It is somewhat radioactive because of the thorium, "it can't focus blue worth a damn", it is in fact an apochromat in infra-red, red and green.

(I'd keep this lens away from young children,)

Enjoy
Harry

Exactly. I have one of these Aero Ektars and did have a 5x4, but was never able to think of what I could do with an aerial lens, optimised for use at infinity, and designed to be used with ortho B&W (ie discard the blue the lens wasn't designed to bother about) to penetrate haze. I was unable to afford a Lancaster. It is a thing of beauty though.

Direct link | Posted on May 21, 2013 at 11:57 UTC
On 10 Photo Editing Programs (that aren't Photoshop) article (353 comments in total)
In reply to:

dhpceo: What about Silkypix or Lightzone?

I've been using Silkypix Pro Developer 4 professionally for around 4 years. Having tried most raw dev s/w and owned and run a few including Capture One, it's the best choice for me. It takes some getting used to - in fact it's clunky until you learn the keyboard shortcuts - but its toolset is powerful and the results are superb so it's well worth persevering. The Pro series do background batch processing, which is essential for me. Camera/file support is excellent, and new models are still being added as they appear, even though v4 was superceded by v5 over a year ago. Because it's Japanese software, support sometimes arrives even before the cameras hit UK.

So, a left field choice compared to LR orthodoxy, but if you want and need to use a proper heavyweight DAM software - I use iMatch - it's among the best.

Direct link | Posted on May 21, 2013 at 11:22 UTC
On Just Posted: Canon G1 X studio test samples article (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

jonikon: With the release of the G1X studio images, it's now obvious to anyone who has eyes that the mediocre slow focusing lens in the G1X puts it at a huge disadvantage to the latest state of the art interchangeable lens cameras like the Nikon System One, Olympus Pen, and Sony NEX cameras. No doubt the Canon G1X will be a the first and last of it's type, soon to be replaced by a compact interchangeable lens camera in the genre of the Sony NEX cameras.

The two-fold question is why is Canon taking so long to enter the very fast growing compact mirror-less ILC market, and will their entry be worth the wait?

Because, quite simply Canon learned the lesson of the 1980's and does not want to trash its DSLR sales. You will notice that the mfrs making the running in EVF bigger-than-pea sensors are all outsiders with little to lose in the DSLR sector.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 23, 2012 at 02:01 UTC
On 'No Future in Photojournalism' Interview: Dan Chung article (278 comments in total)
In reply to:

rusticus: 'The arrival of DSLR video has been a great creative revolution and in the long run'

Yes!!!
I now use both: video and photo - and have no problem

That's the prevailing wisdom, and is propaganda with its own blind spots. You assert stills+video confers ability to survive as a pro, but there's no actual evidence for this. Of pro's I know who have retrained and adapted and invested in video equipment and software, I don't know any who have found it noticeably more viable than stills. They hope it will pay off, but it hasn't, and it is by no means clear that it will because - as Dan says - the demand is not there in UK. And lets not forget that video is a well-contended area, already overcrowded by experienced operators - many "gone freelanced" from the BBC. Your shiny new mammals could just be investing in a new way to starve.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 11, 2012 at 01:03 UTC
On 'No Future in Photojournalism' Interview: Dan Chung article (278 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pentax_Prime: Old news - anyone who has been around journalism in the last decade knows the days of a still shot or two sufficing for a story (or a career) are over. Publications want great photographers who can also take/edit video, write, create their own stories, and work independently. The evolution of the DSLR into a stills and video camera simply eliminates the dedicated video cameras; the profession changed 10 years ago.

Precisely.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 11, 2012 at 00:42 UTC
On 'No Future in Photojournalism' Interview: Dan Chung article (278 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tony Sleep: I have huge respect for Dan, but don't understand his logic. Stills photojournalism has lost its economic base as agencies and crowdsourcing have whittled away the need to pay for professional material. It seems probable that video will follow the same curve, just a bit later. As he says, there are already many amateurs exploring video with impressive competence. They will eventually seek publication for a byline, as with stills.

As for professionals being slow to transition from stills to video, it's a different medium. Those who are most committed to stills are least likely to change simply because they don't have the same fascination with the moving image. Dan is an excepton.

Yes, you are right, extinction - or at least loss of most income - awaits those who don't adapt.

Whilst it's true that old media are dying, it's far from certain that new media have any sort of sustainable model capable of supporting content creation. So far it does not. With very rare exceptions like the WSJ the people making money are aggregators, not publishers and certainly not creators. Unless that changes somehow, by acceptance of paywalls perhaps, then PJ stills and video both have a lean future. Sure, there will be sponsors and corporates to work for, but that's PR, not PJ.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 11, 2012 at 00:38 UTC
On 'No Future in Photojournalism' Interview: Dan Chung article (278 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pentax_Prime: Old news - anyone who has been around journalism in the last decade knows the days of a still shot or two sufficing for a story (or a career) are over. Publications want great photographers who can also take/edit video, write, create their own stories, and work independently. The evolution of the DSLR into a stills and video camera simply eliminates the dedicated video cameras; the profession changed 10 years ago.

"So many people can take good photos these days."

No, they can't. They're miscalibrated. I once saw a transcript of a conversation between HCB and Koudhelka, about how many really good photos they managed to produce. They both concluded about 1 every 9-12m.

I agree that a pro's job is that of filling whitespace between the ads, and that degree of good is seldom required. But if we don't aspire to it and work at it, we certainly can't achieve it.

I speak as someone who has worked professionally as a photographer and occasional writer for 30 years. I can do both, but it compromises both. Like cooking and painting. If you're doing one you aren't doing the other, you miss stuff.
I seem to recall Dan Chung saying he found it frustrating trying to shoot stills and video for the G. a few years back.

It's really a ROI issue, driven by the publisher's quest for ad revenue eyeballs. Please don't dignify it as some sort of revolutionary new form of creativity.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 11, 2012 at 00:18 UTC
On 'No Future in Photojournalism' Interview: Dan Chung article (278 comments in total)
In reply to:

jamooreBPPA: Dan what you mean is 'No Future in Photojournalism' for you!
You know I love but sometimes you do talk rubbish.
After http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Family_of_Man in 1955 they said Photojournalism was dead and its corpse is still twitching.

http://www.worldpressphoto.org/photo/2012alejandrokirchukdls1-al?gallery=2634
Now that is Photojournalism .

Dan's right. The ecology of PJ has collapsed. Yes, there is a living still at the high end, albeit precarious. But how do people get that good without years of survival, practice and learning? The bread and butter stuff that sustained them, from whom a few stars might eventually emerge, has largely evaporated. It is not sustainable any more. And OK, yes, some are wealthy enough or have wealthy parents, to become trust fund professionals. But really, great photos get made despite the business nowadays, and I bet half the WPP winners are really struggling to make ends meet.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2012 at 23:38 UTC
On 'No Future in Photojournalism' Interview: Dan Chung article (278 comments in total)
In reply to:

WalterPaisley: Even if one had a serious desire for a career in photojournalism today, the entry requirements would be well beyond most, e.g.: degree from top school(s), internship(s) with top media organizations, connections, etc etc.

Correct up to the point you used the "job" word. There are almost no jobs in PJ now, and fewer remain by the year. You work as a freelance, ad hoc on commission, or via agencies, on spec at your own cost and risk, or not at all. This is at best a precarious existence. The days of company kit, car, salary and expenses are long gone.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2012 at 23:25 UTC
On 'No Future in Photojournalism' Interview: Dan Chung article (278 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pentax_Prime: Old news - anyone who has been around journalism in the last decade knows the days of a still shot or two sufficing for a story (or a career) are over. Publications want great photographers who can also take/edit video, write, create their own stories, and work independently. The evolution of the DSLR into a stills and video camera simply eliminates the dedicated video cameras; the profession changed 10 years ago.

..and anyone who's tried to do both at once, and/or write and/or interview, knows that this mostly leads to mediocre, compromised results. Entirely different bits of brain are involved and different modes of thinking, never mind having to be in 2 or more places at once, juggle sound, narrative, light and unfolding events. It's an idiocy imposed by accountants who think there's no great skill in any of it, that one person can accomplish in a few hours that which formerly needed 2 or 3. They can't.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2012 at 23:15 UTC
On 'No Future in Photojournalism' Interview: Dan Chung article (278 comments in total)

I have huge respect for Dan, but don't understand his logic. Stills photojournalism has lost its economic base as agencies and crowdsourcing have whittled away the need to pay for professional material. It seems probable that video will follow the same curve, just a bit later. As he says, there are already many amateurs exploring video with impressive competence. They will eventually seek publication for a byline, as with stills.

As for professionals being slow to transition from stills to video, it's a different medium. Those who are most committed to stills are least likely to change simply because they don't have the same fascination with the moving image. Dan is an excepton.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2012 at 23:01 UTC as 36th comment | 3 replies
On First full-res Fujifilm X-Pro1 images appear on the web article (216 comments in total)

Fascinating that so many commenters have either not read the "not post produced" bit (meaning these are straight transpositions from Raw), or have no clue what a Raw file looks like - and why flat, dull and exposed for the highlights is to be expected, and they are loudly and confidently wrong.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 3, 2012 at 18:50 UTC as 7th comment
On Adobe faces criticism for change of upgrade policy article (398 comments in total)

What a lovely company. Still, the counterfeiters will be chuffed to bits.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 22, 2011 at 23:40 UTC as 166th comment
On Sony NEX-7 high-end APS-C mirrorless camera first look article (355 comments in total)

Very interesting combination of attributes, and promising. But aside from the question marks over pixel density issues and lenses that appear to be sized for similar "bigger is serious" marketing, I can see a potentially fatal flaw. Every camera I have ever used that has control wheels projecting from the back surface has suffered from the same problem, that they are hugely susceptible to being knocked off setting every time the camera brushes against your body.

Ergonomically this sort of control is just about perfect, but even with strong detents/friction you can never be sure the control is where you left it. You have to check actual settings every damn time before shooting, which ruins the flow of seeing, else risk ruined shots. Unless Sony have ensured the wheels are only "live" with the shutter is depressed, this is likely to be a huge issue. I look forward to reviews.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2011 at 11:58 UTC as 40th comment | 3 replies
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