ManuelVilardeMacedo

ManuelVilardeMacedo

Lives in Portugal Portugal
Joined on Mar 1, 2012

Comments

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On article Nikon D5 real-world low light, high ISO samples (281 comments in total)
In reply to:

ManuelVilardeMacedo: People still look at these results like young boys going 'wow! An F1 car reaches 340 km/h', as if everything came down to top speed (or high ISO for all that matters).
Besides, I see no reason to use 1/1000 at a concert. 1/125 would be enough to freeze any motion with the camera handheld, especially if the photographer insists in using a wide-angle lens (in which case he could even safely use 1/60). That would make the noise much less intrusive. As it is, this is a mere exercise in the camera's capabilities. Which is great, of course, but in the real world, with the camera in the hands of a professional, things would be quite different.
Feel free to be impressed with these high noise images anyway.

fatdeeman: "...moving vehicle AND it's background..."
That's ITS background, actually.
Otherwise, well... I wish your photographing talents were as great as your bigotry. You'd be the new Sir Cecil Beaton. (Not that you've ever heard of him, but whatever.)

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2016 at 22:26 UTC
On article Nikon D5 real-world low light, high ISO samples (281 comments in total)
In reply to:

ManuelVilardeMacedo: People still look at these results like young boys going 'wow! An F1 car reaches 340 km/h', as if everything came down to top speed (or high ISO for all that matters).
Besides, I see no reason to use 1/1000 at a concert. 1/125 would be enough to freeze any motion with the camera handheld, especially if the photographer insists in using a wide-angle lens (in which case he could even safely use 1/60). That would make the noise much less intrusive. As it is, this is a mere exercise in the camera's capabilities. Which is great, of course, but in the real world, with the camera in the hands of a professional, things would be quite different.
Feel free to be impressed with these high noise images anyway.

armandino, stop making sense. Fatdeeman hates it.

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2016 at 18:40 UTC
On article Nikon D5 real-world low light, high ISO samples (281 comments in total)
In reply to:

ManuelVilardeMacedo: People still look at these results like young boys going 'wow! An F1 car reaches 340 km/h', as if everything came down to top speed (or high ISO for all that matters).
Besides, I see no reason to use 1/1000 at a concert. 1/125 would be enough to freeze any motion with the camera handheld, especially if the photographer insists in using a wide-angle lens (in which case he could even safely use 1/60). That would make the noise much less intrusive. As it is, this is a mere exercise in the camera's capabilities. Which is great, of course, but in the real world, with the camera in the hands of a professional, things would be quite different.
Feel free to be impressed with these high noise images anyway.

Joesiv: they look like roads and non moving subjects. I believe you had panning in mind when you wrote your reply, but panning demands exposure times lower than 1/125 - in my experience at least.
Fatdeeman: thank you for keeping a gallery here at DPR. It allowed me to realize you have no idea of what you're talking about.

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2016 at 17:19 UTC
On article Nikon D5 real-world low light, high ISO samples (281 comments in total)
In reply to:

ManuelVilardeMacedo: People still look at these results like young boys going 'wow! An F1 car reaches 340 km/h', as if everything came down to top speed (or high ISO for all that matters).
Besides, I see no reason to use 1/1000 at a concert. 1/125 would be enough to freeze any motion with the camera handheld, especially if the photographer insists in using a wide-angle lens (in which case he could even safely use 1/60). That would make the noise much less intrusive. As it is, this is a mere exercise in the camera's capabilities. Which is great, of course, but in the real world, with the camera in the hands of a professional, things would be quite different.
Feel free to be impressed with these high noise images anyway.

Well, I freeze cars in motion at 1/125. Most rock musicians don't move that fast on a stage...
Sorry I'm not impressed with the pictures. I know I should, but I'm not.

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2016 at 16:38 UTC
On article Nikon D5 real-world low light, high ISO samples (281 comments in total)

People still look at these results like young boys going 'wow! An F1 car reaches 340 km/h', as if everything came down to top speed (or high ISO for all that matters).
Besides, I see no reason to use 1/1000 at a concert. 1/125 would be enough to freeze any motion with the camera handheld, especially if the photographer insists in using a wide-angle lens (in which case he could even safely use 1/60). That would make the noise much less intrusive. As it is, this is a mere exercise in the camera's capabilities. Which is great, of course, but in the real world, with the camera in the hands of a professional, things would be quite different.
Feel free to be impressed with these high noise images anyway.

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2016 at 14:20 UTC as 23rd comment | 27 replies
In reply to:

Old Cameras: These guys absolutely rock. Long live film.

Amen. I'm an FP4 regular user - it's the film I always come back to - and consider it the best film on Earth.

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2016 at 23:41 UTC
In reply to:

davev8: how many went to 3.3M iso first

Everyone. What did you expect?
(TBLF is obviously not telling the truth :P )

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2016 at 18:56 UTC
In reply to:

marcio_napoli: Obviously, I understand there's someone out there who will benefit from ISO 3 million at least once in a lifetime.

Maybe, someone who had the chance to capture Area 51 shots.

But for the rest of us (by us, I mean myself lol), I feel quite insulted.

What's the purpose of this ISO setting, when it will result in such garbage IQ?

From a noise POV, it looks like a cell phone from 10 years ago. Oh wait, a 10 year old cell phone looks better than that.

Seriously. Deliver "quality" IQ, or do not even include the setting in the camera.

That's my opinion. You're free to disagree.

" understand there's someone out there who will benefit from ISO 3 million at least once in a lifetime"-
If you ever meet him (her), let me know. I organize freak shows for a living.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2016 at 15:25 UTC
In reply to:

ManuelVilardeMacedo: Why does Nikon offer such unusable high ISO figure? Is that because some consumers read such figures like kids looking at a 1980 American muscle car's speedometer?

Noise at ISO 3280000 is impossible to heal and there's liitle sense in using it. 12800 should be the absolute maximum - and even then the effects on sharpness are intolerable. We could say it's a technical prowess, but ultimately it's a futile one. It's technology for technology's sake, serving no practical purposes.

The world of photography has gone crazy.

Just to remind you that Warren Richardson, the winner of 2016 WPP competition, shot his winning picture under moonlight at ISO 6400. And noise is bad enough as it is. (He was clever to convert it to black and white!)

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2016 at 14:39 UTC
In reply to:

brownie314: Can't wait for sensors like this to get into more affordable bodies. It would mean not having to carry huge lenses to get indoor images. Could use f/4 lenses for almost everything.

Yes, if you're a fan of pointillism in photography.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2016 at 14:24 UTC
In reply to:

SmilerGrogan: I shoot news and documentary but I'm bad at math, so could someone please explain what kind of lighting conditions this would enable me to shoot at; let's say I want to stay at 1/60th @ f/2.8. What kind of scenes would open up to me?

Badi, that was a sarcasm.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2016 at 14:22 UTC

Why does Nikon offer such unusable high ISO figure? Is that because some consumers read such figures like kids looking at a 1980 American muscle car's speedometer?

Noise at ISO 3280000 is impossible to heal and there's liitle sense in using it. 12800 should be the absolute maximum - and even then the effects on sharpness are intolerable. We could say it's a technical prowess, but ultimately it's a futile one. It's technology for technology's sake, serving no practical purposes.

The world of photography has gone crazy.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2016 at 14:14 UTC as 126th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

SmilerGrogan: I shoot news and documentary but I'm bad at math, so could someone please explain what kind of lighting conditions this would enable me to shoot at; let's say I want to stay at 1/60th @ f/2.8. What kind of scenes would open up to me?

Black bears running in the woods at night @ f/8 - 1/1000. Or something.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2016 at 14:07 UTC
In reply to:

racin06: WOW...there are always a couple of arrogant critics in these types of threads. I enjoyed the photos and there IS a story being told here by Michael Bonocore. Michael has traveled the world with his camera and he's certainly an accomplished photographer and writer. I just spent an hour browsing Resource Travel's web site...some awesome photos from Michael and others from around the world.

And there are always a couple of bigoted trolls bashing and insulting whoever doesn't have the same tastes as them, so that's a moot point.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2016 at 23:00 UTC
In reply to:

fmian: Nice to see something unique like this to open the doors of creativity.
Anyone up to the challenge of doing close up wide angle beauty portraits with it? :)

Ask Rishi ;)

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2016 at 00:01 UTC

This is not the kind of lens I'd buy - my end-stops should be at about 21mm -, but this review provided for a very interesting read. And a quite down-to-earth one too, without the nonsensical pursuit of bokeh and no absurdities about wide-angle lenses being great for portraits. Just a review in which a lens is used for what it is meant to and is impartially assessed. This is what I call sanity.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2016 at 19:28 UTC as 35th comment
On article On assignment: the Leica Q at a Portland wedding (212 comments in total)
In reply to:

AlanG: "and the 28mm lens is well corrected to avoid tons of distortion at the edges."

I find when shooting people with wide angle lenses it is better to have barrel distortion if people are near to the edges or corners of the frame. DXO actually has a feature where you can apply that and it is why I don't always correct the distortion from my Sony 16-50.

We all love it when heads get the shape of rugby balls...

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2016 at 12:26 UTC
On article Seriously sharp: Sony FE 85mm F1.4 GM samples (263 comments in total)
In reply to:

jonny1976: sharpness and ca very good but booked in my opinion is not at alla as attractive as stated. pretty normal. i'd say the fuji 56 1,2, even if for apsc, or canon 1,2 have better booked.

What exactly have you 'booked' for?

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2016 at 19:56 UTC
On article Action packed: Shooting the Sony a6300 in Miami (241 comments in total)
In reply to:

mosc: Really not trying to troll here (I know, great preface) but would it have been possible to hand the model a pencil or a lolly pop or something to replace the cigarette? I did notice and it did bother me. Sorry if this stirs trouble.

Carey, you took a 50 ton weight off my chest! :)
Indeed, the way your comment was written led me to think you were new to that portrait - but, as I wrote then, I could be getting the wrong impression. Turns out I was misled. I'm glad I was.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2016 at 10:26 UTC
On article Action packed: Shooting the Sony a6300 in Miami (241 comments in total)
In reply to:

mosc: Really not trying to troll here (I know, great preface) but would it have been possible to hand the model a pencil or a lolly pop or something to replace the cigarette? I did notice and it did bother me. Sorry if this stirs trouble.

Androole: I sincerely hope so.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2016 at 22:30 UTC
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