Ignat Solovey

Ignat Solovey

Lives in Russian Federation Moscow, Russian Federation
Works as a photojournalist
Has a website at http://www.dyor.ru
Joined on Jul 24, 2004

Comments

Total: 87, showing: 1 – 20
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On Travel tripods: 5 carbon fiber kits reviewed article (79 comments in total)
In reply to:

David Hurt: $800.00 for a tripod??? You are kidding me. Never!

You just never been in a situation when $300 brand-name tripod fails you. Actually, Chinese no-name tripods are tripods for $300 that DO NOT fail. And even cheaper. I use Sirui T-1205X... well, there are small issues, but I rarely load it with anything lighter than 1DmkIV and 17-40, and always carry it with me in a backpack (2,2 lbs with head is nothing), and use it in quite abusive way, and I paid $200 for it three years ago. So Chinese CF "gitzoids" are THE solution.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 28, 2014 at 14:39 UTC
In reply to:

peevee1: How to get the look/color like in #12 with digital? Some specific film simulation?

Mind the original frame size.... 4x5".

Direct link | Posted on Jul 20, 2014 at 04:48 UTC
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Jogger: In 2000 years, this will look as ancient as cave drawing seem today.

Actually, personal bombings, suicidal and not, as a tool to achieve political goals were invented by Russian radicals in 19th century. "Bombists", targeting policemen and government officials, and even the royal family (Alexander the Second was killed by suicide bomber in 1881, as well as prince Sergey Alexandrovich, Moscow governor, in 1905) were almost ubiquitous then; today they would be called far left and they did a real massacre in 1870s — 1910s. There was one key difference, though: Russian bombists of that era never targeted innocents deliberately and to certain extent tried to avoid unnecessary casualties: Ivan Kalyaev, for example, did not bomb Moscow governor's carriage when he saw him with wife and children, although did that later when the governor was alone (then he was captured by police, tried and executed). Although Soviets really did not use suicide bombers, preferring less disturbing methods.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 18, 2014 at 10:47 UTC
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Jogger: In 2000 years, this will look as ancient as cave drawing seem today.

I'd like to share your opinion, but the same Einstein said: "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe"...

Direct link | Posted on Jul 17, 2014 at 09:36 UTC
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D1N0: Shot with a German camera. Weren't the Zorki's any good?

@D1N0: There were no cameras named Zorki until 1948.

@Tom Caldwell: FEDs were produced in Kharkiv since 1934, and there was a license agreement between Leitz and Soviet government. First 6000 FEDs are valued collectibles in any condition, any FED with number lower than 95000 and NKVD engraving is more valuable than those made later, with two exceptions mentioned below.

In 1941 the factory was relocated to Berdsk, a town near Novosibirsk, and switched to military production. It is known that there were 1800 cameras marked FED-NKAP (People's Commissariat of Aviation Industry) were made in Berdsk, these are highly (but not extortionately) valued collectibles. After the war FED production was restored in Kharkiv (last FED, 5v, was assembled there in 1993, if not 1995), while another plant was built in Krasnogorsk near Moscow. First KMZ cameras of 1947-48 were marked "FED-Zorki", they are very rare and valued collectibles as well. I'm familiar with both FED-NKAP and FED-Zorki in person.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 17, 2014 at 09:31 UTC
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bluevellet: German camera used by the Soviets to immortalize German defeat.

Also, Rodchenko had his first Leica in late 1925 or early 1926 (you wouldn't replace Leica with FED, although I heard that later he had Soviet cameras and lenses as well, which were mostly copies of German and fully compatible). Also, Soviet press and official photographers always were sort of an exception when it came to foreign stuff: in 1950-60s TASS, APN, Pravda and Izvestia photographers used a lot of German cameras (Zeiss Ikon, Balda, Rolleiflex, Contax, Leica, Linhof, Voigltländer, Pentacon/Praktica), Hasseblad too. In late 1960s came Mamiya and Pentax, after 1973 a batch of Nikon cameras and lenses was purchased for TASS and APN. There were even some exotic things like Koni-Omega or Meopta. Sure, there were a lot of Soviet cameras in use by top press photographers: Kiev of all sorts, Salut, Zorki, Zenit, Start, Leningrad, etc. But when it came to serious things, very few pros used Soviet equipment and film if there was a chance to get foreign, and German were the first option.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 17, 2014 at 09:07 UTC
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alexzn: For a fine sample of soviet war pictures see:
http://baltermants.com/#/

BTW, Khaldei's photo was later retouched to remove one of two watches the soldier wore on his hands (evidence of looting which was widespread amend the victorious Red Army soldiers.

ipecaca, there was quite a number of "trophies" brought home by Soviet soldiers, officers and officials. That included watches, cameras, household items, jewellery and even vehicles. Indeed, looting was a penal crime dealt with by the laws of war time, but don't forget about human relations (higher officers in many cases closed their eyes if had their share), and not all these trophies were a loot as we understand it. Don't forget about flea markets and black market in general, it flourished during the war and some years after: if you have some item, but nothing to eat and no means to buy food, and card rations just delay your end a little, you'd bring whatever you have (family silver, crystal vase, watches, or even camera of your MIA father/brother/son) so that not to starve to death for another month, week or even day. Also, eBay as a place to sell things is much more popular in the USA than in Eastern Europe... and military surplus sales in Russia were unheard of till recent times.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 17, 2014 at 08:52 UTC
In reply to:

bluevellet: German camera used by the Soviets to immortalize German defeat.

Rodchenko indeed preferred Leica for the reason many other photographers did: miniscule size and image quality good for general use. You have also to consider that for many non-photographers of the period photo camera meant something much bigger. Regarding assembly quality of Zorki cameras, I wouldn't regard it equal to Leitz. Many have that deceiving impression mostly because there are much more Zorki cameras than screw-mount Leica, because M-series predecessors were taken out of production by mid-1950s, while last batch of Zorki-4K left the factory in 1985. No wonder that 1975-made camera, barely used, looks and feels better than a tool of professional made some 30 years earlier. There were some things which were better, like the universal viewfinder (revolver type), but these are rare exceptions. It's all about production culture. Like it was said in 1960-70s: "Soviet standard is an average, things can be better or worse than it's required, while German is an absolute minimum".

Direct link | Posted on Jul 17, 2014 at 08:20 UTC
In reply to:

alexzn: For a fine sample of soviet war pictures see:
http://baltermants.com/#/

BTW, Khaldei's photo was later retouched to remove one of two watches the soldier wore on his hands (evidence of looting which was widespread amend the victorious Red Army soldiers.

My sources say that not even two, but four. From each hand of both soldiers. I'm not that certain about that, too, but no doubt there were extra watches removed from the picture later.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 23:03 UTC
In reply to:

JohnEwing: He was a bit of a wide boy. He has another great pic of the Red Army marching into Berlin over a Nazi flag lying flat out in the road, with a house burning in the background. Asked if he had put the flag there he said "No. But I did set fire to the house".

I had read the bit about the tablecloths, the difference being that he didn't say "borrowed": he said "stole".

He, as well as all other war correspondents, at least Soviet, was not a war photojournalist of today, but a propagandist, more or less close to what US Signal Corps did. Had Khaldei, Alpert or Khalip worked for today's Reuters, AP, EPA or AFP, they probably would not be praised, but fired for extensive image manipulation and uncaptioned staging.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 23:01 UTC
In reply to:

Jogger: In 2000 years, this will look as ancient as cave drawing seem today.

If it survives in any form, which I doubt. Properly made silver halide print can last up to 150 years at least if stored properly, but I wouldn't compare it to fresco or carved stone. Not to mention that in the year 4014 the devastating wars of 20th century, if remembered at all, would be perceived in a way we now talk of Roman, Persian or Chinese affairs of BC era.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 22:57 UTC
In reply to:

bluevellet: German camera used by the Soviets to immortalize German defeat.

Russians always preferred German cameras, both before and after the war. Even today any old/antique foreign camera is thought of as German by commoners. One of the most popular questions I'm asked when I walk around Moscow with Speed/Crown Graphic in hand is "Is it German?". Kodak cameras, Brownies mostly, were more or less known (at least advertised) before the 1917 revolution, as Kodak had rep offices in St. Petersburg and Moscow, and then only after the USSR collapse and massive arrival of Kodak-branded labs and P&S like Kodak Star 275 or Kodak Cameo. In between, Kodak film was used by the most lucky of cinematographers and photographers, because of complicated relations between the USA and the USSR. I know that Alexander Rodchenko mentioned "reflex cameras, view cameras with plates and that new small Leica for cine film" in his correspondence of mid-1920s, but don't know the brand of that SLRs. Could be some Graflex, but I'm inclined to think they were British or German.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 22:51 UTC
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Malikknows: I enjoy these stories. Cameras are artifacts with their own extraordinary histories to tell. Thanks, DPR.

I wish some of the cameras I own could talk or at least transfer their stories telepathically.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 22:35 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I have to wonder if the camera can be tested against the image, to make sure that it's the one that took the picture... in the same way that they can match guns to bullets. I'd be insisting on that if I was going to pay a half mil for it...

No way. Actually it is enough to know the owner, and here the evidence is obvious, as well as there are enough witnesses alive to confirm that this very camera belonged to Khaldei and he treasured it as the the tool of creation of that photograph. I wonder, though, who will become the owner. I think that someone in Russia might have money and patience to get it for public museum as "national heritage", like billionaire Victor Vekselberg did with Faberge eggs collection several years ago. Local patriots will be in awe in this case.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 22:33 UTC
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Frank_BR: If today, this photo would probably have been taken with a smartphone and not a Leica.

In this exact case, I think, with some top DSLR. But shared on social networks, no doubt.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 22:27 UTC
In reply to:

marc petzold: Funny though, the Leica Elmar 50mm/F3.5 into it's heyday was in fact a slightly modified ZEISS Tessar Lens Design, Max Berek calculated the Design.

Actually no one tried to hide this fact, I guess. Tessar is actually one of the most successful designs, and it is still around in many smartphone cameras, as well as Cooke's Triplet. Before the post-war re-advent of Planar (which was designed by the same Dr. Paul Rudolph in 1908, but abandoned for almost 50 years due to production complexity; many of today's normal primes are its close relatives and direct decendants), Tessar and it's insignificant modifications (Leitz Elmar, Schneider Xenar, Kodak Ektar, GOI/KMZ Industar and tons of Japanese post-war lenses for rangefinders and TLRs) was probably the most popular lens design, and standard lens for professional and classy amateur cameras till well into 1950s. After that the technological advancements allowed the extensive production of more complicated and advanced lenses. The most recent "champion" primes are based on Distagon (Zeiss Otus, Sigma 50 Art), Planar and Sonnar though.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 22:26 UTC
In reply to:

MGJA: Heh. DPR posted the airbrushed version of the shot. Cute.

And airbrushed away were wrist watches, three or four on each hand of both soldiers. Wrist watches were considered a luxury then, so soldiers took them off captives or even dead Germans... and not always that were soldiers. I don't remember all the details of retouching this image was subjected, but it was staged, first of all. From modern photojournalism standpoint, that greatly decreases its value. Although, Rosenthal's Iwo Jima picture was allegedly staged as well (in more than one source I read that two versions of Iwo Jima picture exist: the famous one, which was staged after the actual event, and the original image, much less glorious in appearance).

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 22:10 UTC
In reply to:

Marcello Zini: Well, my Leica is just like that, around 40,000 units later... I wish it was worth a fraction of that money... I'm not sure if it was used to take any historical images, though :( how can I have an idea of its approximate value? Thanks

That depends on actual condition and third-party engravings. Probably there is no historical value, it's just Leica III from mass-produced series. I need to know its exact number to tell the modification and production date. If it bears original Nazi military engraving (Luftwaffe/Wehrmacht/Kriegsmarine), it is more expensive (although there are a lot of fake "Luftwaffe Leicas" around Moscow, in reality they are Zorki or FED).

If there is any sign, which points to famous or notable previous owner, or it is in pristine condition with everything original (leather case, box, manual, warranty card, proof of purchase, etc.), it's a collector's item.

I suppose that your camera is none of that, so basically it costs around 600-700 Euros, if not less. Any scratch, blemish or sign of repair decreases the price, unless, again, there is certain evidence that exactly this camera was used to take some image of noticeable public or historical value by someone known or famous, whoever that was.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 22:01 UTC
In reply to:

Wilhelm: His picture in the article shows him holding the Leica and a 3x4 SPEED GRAPHIC! LOL

Right now there are about 100 Graflex cameras of any kind in Russia, 150 at most, but probably even less than 100. The vast majority of them are recent purchases from eBay.

I myself have two Pacemakers (1949 Crown Graphic 2x3" and 1955 Top Rangefinder Speed Graphic 4x5", both without solenoids; Top RF with rangefinder plunger broken by previous owner, USMC photographer Edwin Dewayne Brey, 1928-1992).

My friend has four Graflexes: 1923 RB Ser. B SLR, 1917 RB Telescopic, 1949 Pacemaker Speed Graphic (that three fully functional and 4x5"), and defunct 1914 3A.

We also have Heiland Graflites unaffected by Star Wars fans, but just for display purposes. They are without flashbulbs, since none were produced in the USSR ever, or at least none survived, and shipping a box of flashbulbs from the US is quite a problem because they are next to explosives from postal point of view. Actually that's a pity, as №31 flashbulb is the only practical and native way to use flash with Graflex FP shutter.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 21:44 UTC
In reply to:

Wilhelm: His picture in the article shows him holding the Leica and a 3x4 SPEED GRAPHIC! LOL

Well. According to one legend (I'm closely familiar with rumors and facts of Russian photojournalists, being Russian news photographer myself, as well as with Speed Graphic, since I dedicate a lot of my free time to Graflex history and use Graphics myself as a hobby), the son of the US Ambassador offered Khaldei a complete set of Speed Graphic 4x5 with all bells and whistles in exchange to exactly that Leica. Khaldei refused. That Speed Graphic was given him as a gift by someone else later. Actually, Speed Graphics were almost unknown in the USSR and very few were in use (another rumor says that there were about dozen of them in TASS and APN, but they disappeared in early 1990s, and were rarely used, colleagues preferred Linhof, Hasselblad and Mamiya, as Soviet standards were metric and some cameras were direct copies of German and Swedish). Copies of German were Fotokor (Zeiss Trona), FED/Zorki (Leica), Moskva (Zeiss Super Ikonta). Salyut/Kiev-88 were clones of Hasselblad 1600F/1000F.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 21:27 UTC
Total: 87, showing: 1 – 20
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