iae aa eia

iae aa eia

Lives in Brazil Recife, PE, Brazil
Works as a EFL Teacher
Joined on Jan 13, 2011
About me:

The first camera I have ever shot with was my mother's Kodak Instamatic 177XF. It happened to me to work as a photographer in the 90's, but I always had problems working by myself (not having the skills to do that marketing thing; socializing and stuff; and thus, feeling discouraged) and I didn't care to find a partner. What I needed was someone to promote my work, or to have learned how to deal with people.

After a long period of time having different and unsuccessful jobs, I started teaching English. It happened by chance, but many opportunities were quickly showing up, and I decided to move on with it. It's not photography, but I can say I still do something I love. I have always liked English, so it never gets old. And most things I've learned through reading, including photography, were written in English.

The first contact I've ever had with photography literature was in the 80's. The husband of a distant relative of mine gave me a photography guide composed of two magazine-sized and four less-than-A4-sized books. Each one of the magazine-sized books was divided in many sections, like cameras, lenses, flashes, framing, darkroom, techniques, pro-photographers' galleries, etc; and the other four books focused on specific photo subjects. Only photos and commentaries on them. One was about people, another was about women, another one, about nature, and one more about architecture. I loved that kit. Later on, when I was able to understand some English, I could compare them with many other guides and I realized that they were quite complete and technically accurate. Really good stuff for Brazilian standards. It was probably the translation of an American guide.

Now, the first contact I've ever had with photography literature, in English, was in 1993. I lived in a city called Natal, RN. I was riding my bicycle when I decided to stop at a newsstand located at a supermarket for a quick look at the magazines as I used to do. I wasn't looking for anything in particular and didn't intend to buy anything, but while I was browsing, I saw that beautiful red glossy cover magazine with lots of SLRs on it, standing on the top shelf. It was the December's 1993 edition of Petersen's PHOTOgraphic magazine. I was in awe, thinking, "Wow, look at this!" I had never seen such an appealing cover (uncommon to Brazilian magazines at that time) and that rich content in terms of equipment. I decided to buy a compact Collins Gem Eng-Port Port-Eng dictionary and a calculator in the same week I bought that magazine, and spent the whole month trying to translate most of the magazine's content and converting feet to meters, inches to mm and cm, and pounds and ounces to kgs, and even dollars to royals (our currency, or 'real/reais' in Portuguese). I continued to buy issues of that magazine for the next 6 months. At first, equipment ads, camera and lens guides and articles, and shopping catalogs where the sections I read the most.

In 1996, I was living in Guarabira, PB, and the owners of a photo shop in Natal called me and invited me to move back there and work as a minilab operator. That was my first job. I got to know the folks there because they didn't have access that kind of magazines and I used to go there and take mine and talk about photography, and we enjoyed that a lot and we became friends. While I was working there, I had the chance to handle some very nice cameras like the Nikon F3, FM2, Minolta Maxxum 9xi, and some others from Pentax. Canon was rare.

Comments

Total: 168, showing: 61 – 80
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On article Wyoming's stunning weather and landscapes in time-lapse (231 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I've seen many great time-lapse videos, but that's the first time I see one moving the camera and the focal length of the lens together, in perfect sinchronization.

They might have used an electronically controlled zooming system, but I wonder what lens allows hundreds of focal length microadjustments so precisely like that.

Simply awesome. Congratulations!

And how do you explain the last 3 or 5 frames of that scene where the zooming stops but the "camera" is still moving in? This kind of failure doesn't look digital. But, look, I do believe the camera moviment is digital, but not the zooming, unless you worked with the scene twice, superimposed or something, but shadows don't denounce that. But, man if you say there was no focal length change, I might be stubborn and say you're not telling the whole trick.

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2014 at 12:37 UTC
On article Wyoming's stunning weather and landscapes in time-lapse (231 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I've seen many great time-lapse videos, but that's the first time I see one moving the camera and the focal length of the lens together, in perfect sinchronization.

They might have used an electronically controlled zooming system, but I wonder what lens allows hundreds of focal length microadjustments so precisely like that.

Simply awesome. Congratulations!

So, by saying false vertigo effect, you're implying there isn't any mechanical focal length change (zooming) in this scene? Or there is, but it was created digitally?

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2014 at 12:10 UTC
On article Wyoming's stunning weather and landscapes in time-lapse (231 comments in total)
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I've seen many great time-lapse videos, but that's the first time I see one moving the camera and the focal length of the lens together, in perfect sinchronization.

They might have used an electronically controlled zooming system, but I wonder what lens allows hundreds of focal length microadjustments so precisely like that.

Simply awesome. Congratulations!

At 2:23 there is, sir. It started with a less short focal length and zoomed out a little. You can see the close subject moving outwards and the far one inwards. But, I'm not sure this is the effect they really wanted, because the most common is the closest subject not to move. Well, maybe that's what they really wanted.

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2014 at 02:37 UTC
On article Wyoming's stunning weather and landscapes in time-lapse (231 comments in total)

I've seen many great time-lapse videos, but that's the first time I see one moving the camera and the focal length of the lens together, in perfect sinchronization.

They might have used an electronically controlled zooming system, but I wonder what lens allows hundreds of focal length microadjustments so precisely like that.

Simply awesome. Congratulations!

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2014 at 21:02 UTC as 64th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

iae aa eia: I don't understand why some guys here don't like the idea of a modular camera. They offer lens interchangeability, the sensor is not ridiculously small, you can have them mounted on your phone (whenever you want), you can achieve far better image quality, can have easier software updates/upgrades, and even pay a lower price. Some guys are even complaining this news should be anywhere else! What is wrong with you, guys?

I love the idea! I have a Nokia 701. Imagine they have its software compatible with Symbian OS and I could buy a mount for, let's say, 200-300 bucks, and then a lens. Awesome! They can even offer handgrips!

The only problem I see with this kind of product is if they ask the same price as an equivalent camera.

It seems to me you are comparing it with a regular camera when you talk about being dedicated and more photography-firendly ergonomics and controls when it is, actually, a category of its own. Let's say, modular phone camera. What's wrong? 'phone' in there? Think about the better IQ it can produce for less money and the fact you are already saving the images to where some people prefer to have them stored, and not still having to transfer anything.

I've read some reviews on Sony's attemps and some folks saying there's not this port nor that button nor adequate ergonomics, etc, but they forget the purpose of the product, and buy it expecting it to become a transformer and turn itself into a heck of a camera. Not at all! Someone even complained there was no HDMI port. What?!

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2014 at 02:33 UTC

I don't understand why some guys here don't like the idea of a modular camera. They offer lens interchangeability, the sensor is not ridiculously small, you can have them mounted on your phone (whenever you want), you can achieve far better image quality, can have easier software updates/upgrades, and even pay a lower price. Some guys are even complaining this news should be anywhere else! What is wrong with you, guys?

I love the idea! I have a Nokia 701. Imagine they have its software compatible with Symbian OS and I could buy a mount for, let's say, 200-300 bucks, and then a lens. Awesome! They can even offer handgrips!

The only problem I see with this kind of product is if they ask the same price as an equivalent camera.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2014 at 00:58 UTC as 10th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

utomo99: Come on Samsung. Try to make camera to beat Sony Rx 100.
With big sensor, fast lens and small body.
And people will be happy

Legit my... They're just holding themselves to the era when larger sensors were an issue. That is not the case anymore. Man, the most (common) compact cameras in the film era were 110, frame similar to 1-inch sensors! Even camcorders. The sensors were that small (as still are today) to allow the quick reading and processing of the signals. That's not the case today either. Smaller sensors than 1-inch are just profitwise components nowadays. Camera makers are perfectly able to abandon these 1/1.7 and smaller in regular cameras (except phones and internal movement zoom cameras).

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2014 at 23:00 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: They should have taken the advantage of being able to make an even more compact 18-55 to make it any brighter with the same size and close to the same price. For instance, an ƒ/2.8-4.8. Or the same aperture but wider zoom range (but still the same size and close price). For instance, an 18-65 or an 16-55. Those alternatives would sound much more interesting. Better investing in such compactness for a mirroless system, because even with a pancake lens, an SLR will always be quite bulky.

OK, then. That seems too difficult for Nikon. Let's leave it to Sony.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2014 at 17:39 UTC
In reply to:

iae aa eia: They should have taken the advantage of being able to make an even more compact 18-55 to make it any brighter with the same size and close to the same price. For instance, an ƒ/2.8-4.8. Or the same aperture but wider zoom range (but still the same size and close price). For instance, an 18-65 or an 16-55. Those alternatives would sound much more interesting. Better investing in such compactness for a mirroless system, because even with a pancake lens, an SLR will always be quite bulky.

You didn't get my point. Why are they looking for extra compactness in an SLR? Trying that on lenses for the mirroless system makes all sense, because they have a very compact body to match. But, is there anything much to match on an SLR body in terms of compactness? I don't see that, but perhaps you do. And the 18-105 is way too much of a difference in zoom range and price. I talk about little improvements. From 18mm to 17 or 16 at one end or from 55 to 60 or 65 at the other end, or from 3.5-5.6 to 2.8-5.6 or 3.5-4.8,... Little, bits of, improvement that would not let the size be any larger or the price any higher (well, at least not any higher than the usual little increasing that comes every little while).

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2014 at 13:32 UTC

They should have taken the advantage of being able to make an even more compact 18-55 to make it any brighter with the same size and close to the same price. For instance, an ƒ/2.8-4.8. Or the same aperture but wider zoom range (but still the same size and close price). For instance, an 18-65 or an 16-55. Those alternatives would sound much more interesting. Better investing in such compactness for a mirroless system, because even with a pancake lens, an SLR will always be quite bulky.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2014 at 12:43 UTC as 31st comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

Kurt_K: I think people are forgetting (or simply never knew) how good 1/1.7 sensors can be at ISO 100-400, which is usually all you need anyway due to the fast, high quality lenses that these types of cameras come with. Frankly, I think it's comical how quickly everyone jumped on the 1" sensor bandwagon after the release of the RX100.

It's not comical, just rational (or reasonable). I guess a good portion of the consumers of 1/1.7" sensor cameras (most of them for enthusiasts) were already sort of wondering if the sensor were somewhat bigger but still smaller than 4/3 (or m4/3). That's my case. I don't have a 1" (yet), but I had an LX3 (died of salt water) and many times I wondered how even greater it would be if it had a little bigger sensor (a size close to 110 film format, for instance).

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2013 at 14:27 UTC
On article Fujifilm XQ1 First Impressions Review (163 comments in total)
In reply to:

DouglasGottlieb: The 2/3 sensor in a compact makes a lot of sense to me. That’s a pretty appealing little camera. But with the RX100ii coming with hotshoe, tilting screen and more capable video, it might be a tough sell. And I much prefer the XF’s style. But to me, this really exposes the X20. That camera should have gotten a bigger sensor in this round. Gorgeous and ergonomic as it is, the compact sensor in that relatively large X20 form factor no longer feels competitive. The Xtrans makes up some quality distance, but at some point, sensor size and IQ start to align. I’m eager to see a FF Fuji.

IMO, I can't see any sense about a sensor smaller than a 1" one, unless we're talking about built-in zoom compacts and phone cameras.

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2013 at 14:03 UTC

I still don't feel like the design of the digital OMs is working. With a grip, the Evolts still look more balanced, and without a grip, which I think is the design that would live up better to the OM design, still show unbalanced design of the pentaprism-like top, and the general layout design of the top and (especially) the back look unattractive. They should try to get closer to the general proportions of the OM-1, that is, more rectangular body and less protruding pentaprism housing top.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2013 at 12:56 UTC as 32nd comment
On article Ten one-of-a-kind cameras from the 21st century (249 comments in total)

I had a V570. It has an attractive design and unusual silver metallic back. The panorama feat and the 23mm lens allowed great shots. The front big and round metallic cover is nice and makes a nice metallic sound when closing and opening. It's the kind of cam one just wants to own, to touch.

I would love to still have it, even if only to put it on a shelf in the bedroom or living room. I lost it. I was going to the airport with a friend to say goodbye to a group of teenagers flying to the States and asked him to put it in one of his backpack pockets. He put it together with a small book and when he was getting in the car, the pocket was open and both items fell between the curbside and the car.

It was dark. The lamp of the pole in front of his house was broken. I was in the car and heard something falling and could see he taking and putting the book back into the pocket, but I didn't realize (and he didn't remember) he had put the camera in the same pocket. We missed it too late.

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2013 at 12:36 UTC as 95th comment
On Connect post Do you need 41 megapixels? Our Nokia Lumia 1020 camera review (369 comments in total)

OK, it's a great phone, but I can't believe this is the successor of the 808 PureView.

Link | Posted on Aug 31, 2013 at 00:55 UTC as 70th comment | 17 replies
On article Sony A3000 First Impressions Review (680 comments in total)

An SLR-style NEX mount camera + lens kit for $400 is a nice and bold move. And some say it's a good sensor in a limited body. Well, that's better than the opposite, right? Congrats, Sony! (I guess the huge profit they're making out of the RX1 made this price point possible. Kidding.)

Link | Posted on Aug 27, 2013 at 13:57 UTC as 166th comment
On article Canon PowerShot G16 Real-world Samples Gallery (92 comments in total)

I don't know if those shots were taken in auto mode, but if they were, it's quite competent at exposure control, and the color balance very good. The skin color was, not analizing much, close to perfect, looking quite natural. It's the G just getting better and better, but I guess I would still get the LX7. Inferior, but for me buying a camera with a such small sensor, it has to come with a heck of a bright German lens, just for me to admire it and boast about it (may sound silly, I know). Other than that, I don't see an appeal in it, and I would rather go for a 1-inch sensor or larger.

In the film era, there were the 110 film format, and it was already considered small and DOF limiting enough, and nowadays we have this strong culture on a sensor FIVE TIMES SMALLER!

Link | Posted on Aug 27, 2013 at 02:19 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

Juck: Make the bloody ink affordable and non of this would be necessary.

And the real problem of your comment is your nonhumanness kind of ideology. Telling people not to be a consumer economy is a waste of time. Not because people are a lost cause about it, but because being a consumer economy is simply... human!

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2013 at 03:24 UTC

I was waiting for the day they would reach the same 60 x optical zoom of a camcorder, but starting at 20mm IS INSANE! Ok, considering its sensor size and the mp count, it's probably a low resolution optical design (I guess). Keep up the bold moves!

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2013 at 22:55 UTC as 50th comment
On article DPReview launches GearShop (316 comments in total)
In reply to:

Create Dont Imitate: So long everyone... taking this site off my favorites and canceling my membership.

I haven't been here long... but this site cant possibly be unbiased... if they are SELLING THE GEAR THEY ARE REVIEWING.

Good luck to everyone.

Hey, bud; Stay for another cup of coffee :] Give them a try. If they are biased we will find out, because, though they are one of the best (if not the best), they are one among many good review websites, and some of us happen to be checking others, so it won't be difficult to find out they're being biased.

Link | Posted on Jul 17, 2013 at 23:33 UTC
Total: 168, showing: 61 – 80
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