Wally626

Joined on Oct 2, 2011

Comments

Total: 106, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Eleson: Anyone else than me that is a bit surprised with the flange diameter?
(I hesitate to use the word disappointed as I'm not even close to being in the market for this one.)
But it seems to be designed around the sensor size, which leaves no or very little room for a camera with a larger sensor at a later stage.
To me, it seems a bit shortsighted from an MF manufacturer.

Sounds like, from the report, that building a mount and lenses to cover the full 4.5 x 6 image circle made the camera too big. Eventually they will make a mirrorless for the bigger sensors, but it will require a new set of lenses or a mount that can take the old lens line-up directly. Makes some sense sell small sensor MF with small lenses for small money (comparatively) and the medium sensor MF for large money. To me large MF would be the classic 6 x 6 and 6 x 7 formats, which are not even on the horizon yet.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 15:43 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: ...Yes, but does it do Macro?

I have a 1000mm, I stick my entire stack of extension tubes on it to get it to focus at 30 ft. A bit short of macro, good for head shots.

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 15:50 UTC
In reply to:

jon404: Money aside, and looking at the other side of this, why not a fixed-lens full frame, like the Sony or Leica Q, and then crop to get that extreme telephoto effect?

Sony RX1mii, 42 Mp with 35mm lens, crop to 70mm and you have 10.5 MP, Ok for most uses, crop to 140mm now you are down to 2.6 MP, ok for web pages and small prints, go to 280mm you are down to 0.66 MP, Ok for small web images, maybe a 4x6 print, at 600mm you are at 0.149 MP good for thumbnails. In most cases on a hike you do not need 600mm, unless doing a lot of wildlife shooting but you can crop a 35mm or 28mm image only so far and still have a usable image.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2016 at 16:33 UTC
In reply to:

Smitty1: I would really like to see a 24-85mm (equiv) pocketable, fixed lens compact with an APS-C sized sensor and optional EVF.

Looking at the example photos, the 1" sensor just doesn't resolve enough detail imo.. APS-C is closer to a goldilocks sized sensor for a compact.

Closets thing right now is the Sony A6000 or A6300 with the kit 16-50mm collapsible lens (24 to 75mm). Big pocket pocketable, not for jeans.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2016 at 21:23 UTC
In reply to:

dahod: Sony must have their rational for compromising the RAW files on their Pro camera. While some have minimized the potential effects, the end result is that they are compromised.

While we never can be sure, can anyone speak to legitimate reasons that would possibly drive Sony in this direction, particularly in this age of large files?

Reply to Azimuth46, The 42 MP sensor has little to do with still photography it is the heart of a future 8k camcorder. I think you will see this sensor a lot in the future in various incarnations. If only still was important, Sony would have gone to 54 MP not 42.

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2015 at 17:38 UTC
In reply to:

ET2: DPR puts a note under the image: " Copyright NASA"

NASA images can't be copyrighted. They are public domain as everything else produced by the govt

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelines.html

"NASA material is not protected by copyright unless noted."

Please remove that false claim the image is copyrighted. It's not

NASA may use in publications images copyrighted by others, they would then be noted as having a copyright, but no picture taken by NASA itself is copyrighted.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2015 at 18:51 UTC
In reply to:

ET2: DPR puts a note under the image: " Copyright NASA"

NASA images can't be copyrighted. They are public domain as everything else produced by the govt

https://www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelines.html

"NASA material is not protected by copyright unless noted."

Please remove that false claim the image is copyrighted. It's not

NASA should be credited for the image, but yes, if it is a NASA image no copyright.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2015 at 13:58 UTC
On article Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV Review (1602 comments in total)
In reply to:

justmeMN: 4K video with low-fi sound doesn't sound like a good match. (No external microphone jack.)

If you need quality sound you probably want the RX10m2, which does have sound inputs.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2015 at 18:53 UTC
On article Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV Review (1602 comments in total)
In reply to:

Average User: So stupid me. Headline spec above (1" type) sensor. I thought it meant the camera has a one inch sensor. 1" sensor is also the stated size in specifications, followed by the following parenthetica; (13.2 x 8.8 mm). I didn't even stop to look at the parenthetical. One inch is one inch. Right. So I bought the camera. Oh oh. Not so fast. I should have. One inch is 26 mm. So I'm trying to figure one inch. Well multiplying the length by height, it's actually .18. less than 20% of a square inch. Ok the diagonal...oh oh. That's just 16mm or about 60% of a lineal inch. Wait. If I add the two dimensions I get 22 mm; hmm not even.
OK Risbi this is too hard of a problem for me. Why is it ok to call 18% of a square inch a one inch sensor?
Serious. Sony is making an outstanding camera here. Why do they have to lie about the sensor size?

It is just the outdated naming convention for video sensors, a 1/2.3 sensor is not 1/2.3 inch in diameter either. Nor is a 4/3 sensor 1 1/3 inch in diameter. Most manufactures do tell you the size of the sensor in mm, so you do get the information. The same sort of naming conventions also apply to the larger formats, APS-C either Nikon(Sony) or Canon are not the same size as the old film format, nor are full frames sensors 24 x 36mm, although they are normally pretty close.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2015 at 18:52 UTC
In reply to:

toughluck: Apple goes to new lengths in greed here.
Normally, when you launch a new enterprise, you risk that it may fail and if it does, you're the only one to bear the brunt of it. But if you succeed, you're also the only one to benefit from it directly.
Apple is launching a new service, and what they planned to do was reap all the benefits of revenue while dropping the burden of cost on somebody else.
About those photographers' contracts: Don't you guys know how to shoot in bursts? Take 5-10 shots of the same scene, publish one picture, if there are interested buyers, sell the remaining 4-9. Technically, you're not breaking the contract. Or contact Swift's management to obtain a permission, like they're saying here.

Apple negotiated with the major labels to get three months free in exchange for a higher rate of return once the paid sales started. For established acts and labels it was a good deal but for new acts that may have big earnings for a short period of time, and that time was the three month trial, they would have been hurt.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2015 at 23:43 UTC
In reply to:

xeriwthe: wow serious innovation in sensor tech hitting the real time (sure, foveon's done it before but certainly not in a mainstream way). mad respect for sony's silicon engineering.

hope my favorite manufacturer can hold out long enough in today's insanely competitive camera business to bring their version to market!

The invention is not on the sensor side of the sensor. It is a normal back-side illuminated (BSI) sensor like Sony has been using in smaller cameras for a few years. The change is putting the memory on the back of the sensor chip so it can read out the pixel values much faster than a normal sensor can.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2015 at 13:50 UTC
On article Alpha dog: Hands-on with Sony a7R II (1118 comments in total)
In reply to:

ptox: What's the downside to the electronic shutter? -- I assume there is one, or why would they bother with a mechanical shutter as well?

The e-shutter reads a line at a time, each line has a short exposure but by the time the camera is finished reading from top to bottom it could be 1/30th of a second, and thus a moving object gets distorted. The mechanical shutter normally goes much faster, say 1/250th or faster to cover the whole frame. Global shutter is the answer, reading the whole frame at one time into buffer cells then reading the cells out slowly. Not yet on this class of camera.

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2015 at 19:39 UTC
On article Alpha dog: Hands-on with Sony a7R II (1118 comments in total)
In reply to:

ptox: What's the downside to the electronic shutter? -- I assume there is one, or why would they bother with a mechanical shutter as well?

The drawback to EFCS is mostly that some lenses cannot stop down fast enough and you get a messed up exposure. Mostly a problem with larger aperture lenses shooting at small apertures. This is a problem on A-mount, never heard that it was a problem on E-mount at least with native lenses.

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2015 at 19:29 UTC
In reply to:

raztec: Yup, this is the camera I want...but never in a million years will be able to afford.

I expect the Sony A7II plus 28mm f/2 is going to fall short of the results of this camera. Similar to the Sony RX1 being the best 35mm full frame camera. You lose versatility with the fixed lens design but it does allow the maker to have the best possible lens for the sensor, within its cost, size, mass envelope, without the restrictions due to the mount.

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2015 at 15:28 UTC
On article Massive $33,500 2450mm f/8 NASA lens surfaces on eBay (235 comments in total)

First question is: what did the seller pay at the GSA auction for this item?

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2015 at 12:57 UTC as 36th comment | 1 reply
On article 3,200 megapixel LSST camera gets construction approval (257 comments in total)

These numbers may be a bit off, but I thought the equivalence folks would be interested. Based on a square sensor with 10 micron pixels the camera would have a diagonal of 800mm, with the reported 3.5° view angle that would be a focal length of 13,000 mm. With a 8.4m aperture that works out to f/1.6. In terms of a 35mm FF sensor that would be a 700mm lens. The crop factor of 18 would give you an aperture of 0.09 which is not possible. Using a f/5.6 lens you would need to push the ISO to 440,000. So a really big fast lens stuck on a Sony A7s pushed to ISO 400,000 would get you close except for resolution of course, only 12 MP versus 3.2 GP

Link | Posted on Feb 4, 2015 at 21:32 UTC as 7th comment
On article Fujifilm announces XF 16-55mm F2.8 R LM WR lens (295 comments in total)

I am a Sony guy, but it does look like a nice addition to the Fuji X-line. The size and cost is about the same as a Sony 16-50mm f/2.8 (A-mount) + LA-EA4 adaptor. A bit lighter and shorter plus not needing the complexity of an adaptor.

It really cannot be compared to the 24-70's of the world as those are built for a full frame sensor and that alone adds a lot of cost.

The closest E-mount lens is the Sony-Zeiss 16-70mm f/4. You gain a bit of focal length and lose a bit of speed for a little less money and a big drop in weight and size.

Seems the Fuji is pretty well positioned in comparison.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 14:52 UTC as 21st comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Albino_BlacMan: How long of an exposure do you need at 0.005 lux. Isn't that an imperative piece of information?

I assume some of the better sensors out there can capture some kind of image at that level if you leave the shutter open long enough.

Reply to Nezhin
I am not sure on the requirements for how Gain is defined, some cameras do allow negative gains, but this might be like setting a camera to ISO 50 when the base ISO is 100. In practice it makes little difference as you will not be buying a camera with this sensor, unless it comes in your next car. If the same tech makes it into a still camera then the ISO value will be clear.

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2014 at 22:32 UTC
In reply to:

Albino_BlacMan: How long of an exposure do you need at 0.005 lux. Isn't that an imperative piece of information?

I assume some of the better sensors out there can capture some kind of image at that level if you leave the shutter open long enough.

Reply to Nezhin
The exposure was 1/60th at f/1.4. We only know the exposure for the 0.005 lux scene was with 72 dB of gain, the same scene shot at 1/60 f/1.4 at 0 dB gain had 400 lux of light and was normally exposed. What we do not know is what ISO level 0 or 72 dB corresponds to. Although given the light is an intensity ratio there should be about 12 EV difference between the two exposures. I assumed 0 dB to be ISO 100 but of course it could be a different number, 200 or 400 or even 3200.

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2014 at 13:31 UTC
In reply to:

Albino_BlacMan: How long of an exposure do you need at 0.005 lux. Isn't that an imperative piece of information?

I assume some of the better sensors out there can capture some kind of image at that level if you leave the shutter open long enough.

Reply to Nezhin, not sure how you get 270,000,000. If you are using decibels gain as used for power ratios. 72dB would equal 15,848,932 times, set to log 2 you get 23.92 EV, with a base ISO of 100 that would make it ISO 1,6 billion. If you use intensity ratio then 72 db is 3981.1, log2 is 11.96 EV or ISO 400,000 with base ISO of 100. Of course my db calculation memories are bit fuzzy

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2014 at 16:52 UTC
Total: 106, showing: 1 – 20
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