J Parker

J Parker

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Dec 12, 2008

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Total: 63, showing: 1 – 20
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On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III First Impressions Review preview (2970 comments in total)

Thanks for your personal impressions of an imperfect, but still incredible camera.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 9, 2014 at 21:01 UTC as 110th comment
On Leica T (Typ 701) First Impressions Review preview (2300 comments in total)

Leica gets a disproportionate share of animosity that I'm still trying to figure out.

Leica introduces an $8,000 monochrome camera and many of us are outraged.
But Phase One introduces a monochrome camera that costs 5x the price ($40,000!) and the forums here are silent -- no outrage -- nothing.

It must be a Leica thing...

My auto fanatic friends look forward to the next model by Ferrari, Lamborghini, or Spyker, etc. None of them will ever buy a car that costs $500,000, but they don't whine and complain because Ferrari prices it how they choose. And these vehicles have a several month waiting list if you can get one at all. This is the same crowd that buys Leica. Exotic cars and exotic cameras are marketed to individuals who often do not have the same budget considerations as most of us. Leica has the same right to cater to this market as Ferrari does.

My auto fanatic friends don't stop enjoying their Mustangs when Ferrari puts out a new model. Enjoy the camera you have.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 26, 2014 at 15:37 UTC as 391st comment | 8 replies
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 Review preview (492 comments in total)
In reply to:

J Parker: Initially I thought this camera was expensive -- then I realized it might be dollar for dollar one of the best camera values around.

If the Zeiss lens is as good or better than the f2.0-2.4 from the days of the Sony F707/717/828, this is tremendous value for the money. Consider the cost of a Canon or Nikon F2.8 24-200mm lens combination -- then ask yourself how much would a Zeiss equivalent would cost.... To add a little more food for thought, years ago, Luminous Landscape did a shoot out between the above mentioned Canon L Glass and the fixed Zeiss lens on the Sony F828. The Canon should have won hands down -- it was a dead heat.

Think about the sum of the parts this camera offers. This camera is worth every dime.

tkbslc, thanks for your response. I agree -- it would be great if the lenses I mentioned were interchangeable.

As to the resale value though, it depends. For example, on the most popular used camera sites, a Sony F828 commands about twice the value of a Nikon D70 in similar condition (both the Sony and Nikon came out in the same year, 2005).

Direct link | Posted on Mar 20, 2014 at 18:53 UTC
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 Review preview (492 comments in total)

Initially I thought this camera was expensive -- then I realized it might be dollar for dollar one of the best camera values around.

If the Zeiss lens is as good or better than the f2.0-2.4 from the days of the Sony F707/717/828, this is tremendous value for the money. Consider the cost of a Canon or Nikon F2.8 24-200mm lens combination -- then ask yourself how much would a Zeiss equivalent would cost.... To add a little more food for thought, years ago, Luminous Landscape did a shoot out between the above mentioned Canon L Glass and the fixed Zeiss lens on the Sony F828. The Canon should have won hands down -- it was a dead heat.

Think about the sum of the parts this camera offers. This camera is worth every dime.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 20, 2014 at 18:17 UTC as 133rd comment | 9 replies
On Fujfilm interview: 'The only way is to keep innovating' article (228 comments in total)

This might be the best interview of this type I've ever read. The fact that Fujifilm draws on the expertise of an engineer who helped develop its Provia and Velvia films is an advantage that very few camera companies can claim (thank you Barnaby for asking that question!).

I use primarily Sony Nex and Panasonic mirrorless cameras -- but for my most important portrait work, the Fujifilms still have no peer. The Fujifilm portraits are the only ones where my clients continuously ask what camera was used to take them. They're the only cameras I have where I've never needed to shoot RAW (or post process at all) to get outstanding images, saving me tons of time to shoot more pictures instead of sitting behind a computer. I ended up giving away two Nikon DSLRs -- the Fujifilm's color rendition is just that good.

Thanks DPReview for the insightful interview.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2014 at 16:00 UTC as 62nd comment | 1 reply
On Sony Alpha 7 Review preview (1606 comments in total)
In reply to:

J Parker: Wow. Just how revolutionary does a camera have to be to get a gold award?
If Sony made a camera that walked on water, some of us would complain that the water wasn't wet enough. I respect DPReview's conclusions (let's be honest -- DPReview's reviews are consistently outstanding and worth the wait). But as with any review, actually put the camera through its paces for yourself and decide if its for you or not. The fact is, whether its Fuji, Canon, Nikon, or Sony, etc., cameras of this caliber perform at a level of excellence unheard of even five years ago. The fact that we can with a straight face nitpick about image quality at ISO 12, 800 only shows that we as photographers have it made.

Shawn, thanks for your response. You hit it right on the head -- I find that a camera's ability to inspire me to shoot with it is just as important as its spec sheet. I respect that the reviews have a certain level of subjectivity to them because behind every camera is a real person with his or own expectations about what a camera should accomplish for them. Thanks for the excellent review of a great (but certainly not perfect) camera.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 24, 2014 at 01:14 UTC
On Sony Alpha 7 Review preview (1606 comments in total)

Wow. Just how revolutionary does a camera have to be to get a gold award?
If Sony made a camera that walked on water, some of us would complain that the water wasn't wet enough. I respect DPReview's conclusions (let's be honest -- DPReview's reviews are consistently outstanding and worth the wait). But as with any review, actually put the camera through its paces for yourself and decide if its for you or not. The fact is, whether its Fuji, Canon, Nikon, or Sony, etc., cameras of this caliber perform at a level of excellence unheard of even five years ago. The fact that we can with a straight face nitpick about image quality at ISO 12, 800 only shows that we as photographers have it made.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 23, 2014 at 22:48 UTC as 175th comment | 4 replies
On DPReview Gear of the Year - Part 1: Fujifilm X100S article (307 comments in total)

I shoot Sony mirrorless about 90% of the time. But for that 10% of the time when color rendition has to be not only good, but phenomenal, I reach for my Fujifilm cameras.

The X100/X100s has clearly been the most influential camera of the last few years -- and that has been a good thing.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 15, 2013 at 17:23 UTC as 13th comment
In reply to:

J Parker: Sony has a well deserved reputation for being one of the world's most innovative companies -- I'm glad it has extended that innovation to the photography field. I'm always amazed that despite Sony's years of experience with film and video, Sony is treated by some of us like a novice when it comes to still photography. Although I still shoot with Nikon's, the Sony's are a pure joy to use -- their innovations simply allow things that other cameras don't. For example, I recently used an old Sony F707 and shot landscapes and macros in pure darkness with the camera's built in infrared scope. I then used its built in laser holograph beam to focus on subjects that none of my current cameras could nail (remarkably, all this from a 2001 camera). Current Sony cameras like the RX1 and A7 are natural progressions from a company that chooses to make cutting edge cameras instead of recycling the same models. Sony has pushed photography forward in ways beneficial to all of us as photographers.

Minzaw, would it be safe to say that you won't be joining the Sony User's Group on Flickr? Just wondering.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2013 at 19:48 UTC
On Nikon Df preview (2817 comments in total)

Although I shoot a lot of video, strangely enough, I've always had a preference for Nikon's pre-video models (D700, D200, etc). As with Leica's Monochrom, there is a market for cameras that don't have every bell or whistle (it reminds me of the audio buyers who in an age of multi-channel home theatre systems, simply want an unadulterated two channel stereo amp--and are willing to pay top dollar for it).

Whether this camera fails or succeeds, I commend Nikon for attempting something different.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2013 at 05:25 UTC as 950th comment

Sony has a well deserved reputation for being one of the world's most innovative companies -- I'm glad it has extended that innovation to the photography field. I'm always amazed that despite Sony's years of experience with film and video, Sony is treated by some of us like a novice when it comes to still photography. Although I still shoot with Nikon's, the Sony's are a pure joy to use -- their innovations simply allow things that other cameras don't. For example, I recently used an old Sony F707 and shot landscapes and macros in pure darkness with the camera's built in infrared scope. I then used its built in laser holograph beam to focus on subjects that none of my current cameras could nail (remarkably, all this from a 2001 camera). Current Sony cameras like the RX1 and A7 are natural progressions from a company that chooses to make cutting edge cameras instead of recycling the same models. Sony has pushed photography forward in ways beneficial to all of us as photographers.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2013 at 02:49 UTC as 49th comment | 4 replies
On Sony Alpha A7 / A7R preview (2372 comments in total)

The majority of the most impressive innovations over the last few years seem to be coming from the underdogs -- Fujifilm, Olympus, Panasonic, and of course Sony. As a loyal Nikon shooter, it's hard not to be envious. I've already begun the transition to Sony and Fujifilm....

Direct link | Posted on Oct 16, 2013 at 14:55 UTC as 568th comment
On Ten one-of-a-kind cameras from the 21st century article (248 comments in total)

The Luminous Landscape reviewed the Sony F707 years ago and stated:

"...there's no getting around it: I LOVE THIS SONY. Some cameras you just take to. It's slowly become evident to me over the years that some camera designs are more than the sum of their parts, more than a collection of features. You can't discover this from a catalog or a spec sheet. They just work better; they're harmonious; they inspire more affection, more loyalty. They fit you."

An updated version of this camera with the RX100's sensor would be revolutionary

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2013 at 15:37 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
On Ten one-of-a-kind cameras from the 21st century article (248 comments in total)
In reply to:

J Parker: Regarding the Sony F707, some tips for those who are interested in this camera that 10 years later, is still ahead of its time:

It's ability to operate in total silence and unique L design makes it the ultimate street camera. In addition to shooting at waist level, with a little practice, it can shoot to either side or even behind you.

The camera more or less doubles as a nightscope. It allows you to do street, macro and wildlife photography (and video) in total darkness.

Turning it into a daylight infrared camera is simple -- put black tape over each infrared lamp and screw on an ND filter and infrared filter.

Although I use Nikons for most of my pro work, the F707 image quality holds its own and I use it for some studio portrait work. Clients who experience the laser beam focusing will think you are the James Bond of photographers -- it's a nice wow factor and the Zeiss lens has a nice cinematic look for portraits.

At $50 buy it if you can find one!

An updated 707 with Sony's RX100 Sensor would be great.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2013 at 15:31 UTC
On Ten one-of-a-kind cameras from the 21st century article (248 comments in total)

Regarding the Sony F707, some tips for those who are interested in this camera that 10 years later, is still ahead of its time:

It's ability to operate in total silence and unique L design makes it the ultimate street camera. In addition to shooting at waist level, with a little practice, it can shoot to either side or even behind you.

The camera more or less doubles as a nightscope. It allows you to do street, macro and wildlife photography (and video) in total darkness.

Turning it into a daylight infrared camera is simple -- put black tape over each infrared lamp and screw on an ND filter and infrared filter.

Although I use Nikons for most of my pro work, the F707 image quality holds its own and I use it for some studio portrait work. Clients who experience the laser beam focusing will think you are the James Bond of photographers -- it's a nice wow factor and the Zeiss lens has a nice cinematic look for portraits.

At $50 buy it if you can find one!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2013 at 20:39 UTC as 57th comment | 2 replies

Another suggestion for part 2 -- the Pentax Optio S. It was so small that you could use an Altoids tin as a camera case (which is exactly what Pentax did when they revealed the camera at 2003's Consumer and Electronics Show). With decent image quality and the ability to use it as digital audio recorder, 3D and Panorama modes, it still makes a nice pocket camera at its $20 price these days.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2013 at 22:59 UTC as 39th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Sergeg: It's almost inconceivable how some of those designs got past the drawing board in terms of ergonomics and aesthetics. Technological advances aside, when you consider the form factor of the typical smart phone today, and it's still camera and HD video camera capabilities, then product design is obviously subject to the same evolutionary processes as all art forms.
After all, the ancient Egyptians only portrayed their world in 2D.

My first DSLR 10 years ago, was the Fuji S2Pro, which I still have, relatively little has changed in DSLR design in the last decade by comparison.

Many DSLRs later, the S2Pro is still my goto camera for portraits and landscapes. Very few cameras today have this level of color rendition.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2013 at 15:40 UTC
In reply to:

J Parker: Excellent Article! I'm looking forward to part two. Many of these early cameras would be considered advanced even by today's standards. One example is the Sony F707 from 2002. Imagine a camera today that:

1.Had one of the best lenses ever made for a camera -- a Carl Zeiss lens with a 2.0 aperture at 38mm -- and 2.4 at 192mm (a comparable DSLR lens would cost $2000+) . It's cinematic rendering is why I use it for pro work to this day.

2.Is infrared ready out the box. It not only shoots in total darkness (think military nightscope), but with the addition of iinfrared and ND filters becomes a full fledged daylight infrared camera.

3.Uses a holographic laser beam to acquire focus under any condition (wow).

4.Has a unique L-shape form factor and swivel lens design that allows you to shoot over crowds, shoot at waist level, to the left or right--or even around corners. It's still my go-to street shooting camera.

At under $75 today, it's an absolute steal if you can find one.

The F828 was a special camera. There's an article on The Luminous Landscape website that compares the Zeiss lens on that camera to the far more expensive (and excellent) Canon L glass. Neither lens won this shootout -- it was a draw. Not bad for a camera that goes for only $180 these days.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2013 at 07:16 UTC

Excellent Article! I'm looking forward to part two. Many of these early cameras would be considered advanced even by today's standards. One example is the Sony F707 from 2002. Imagine a camera today that:

1.Had one of the best lenses ever made for a camera -- a Carl Zeiss lens with a 2.0 aperture at 38mm -- and 2.4 at 192mm (a comparable DSLR lens would cost $2000+) . It's cinematic rendering is why I use it for pro work to this day.

2.Is infrared ready out the box. It not only shoots in total darkness (think military nightscope), but with the addition of iinfrared and ND filters becomes a full fledged daylight infrared camera.

3.Uses a holographic laser beam to acquire focus under any condition (wow).

4.Has a unique L-shape form factor and swivel lens design that allows you to shoot over crowds, shoot at waist level, to the left or right--or even around corners. It's still my go-to street shooting camera.

At under $75 today, it's an absolute steal if you can find one.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2013 at 04:42 UTC as 85th comment | 2 replies
On Sigma 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM Preview preview (349 comments in total)

Very nice gallery images.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 10, 2013 at 18:40 UTC as 50th comment
Total: 63, showing: 1 – 20
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