Dario D

Dario D

Lives in United States CA, United States
Has a website at http://www.deefrag.com
Joined on Apr 26, 2007

Comments

Total: 11, showing: 1 – 11
On Adobe announces Photoshop Elements 11 news story (68 comments in total)

Heh, a brighter background, and larger text & buttons. The main problem with Photoshop Elements was that users had insecurities about whether or not it was professional... and now these 2 changes lunge it in exactly the wrong direction, adding everything people don't want to see in this program: brighter and larger.

If the interface had always been like this, perhaps people could appreciate it more (there are some programs out there that pull off bright/large very well), but there's a contrast effect where you compare something new with the version you had before it... and I can't imagine anyone liking 1) suddenly having large buttons, whereas before they were small... and 2) a bright interface, whereas before it was dark and professional. For instance, I absolutely can't stand editing darker images on a bright screen, because you can't see into the dark regions.

Hopefully, there will be options for this stuff, but I wonder how many people will find them.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 27, 2012 at 01:33 UTC as 11th comment
On Mars rover camera project manager explains 2MP camera choice news story (187 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dario D: Unlike a lot of commenters, I trust that the Curiosity guys are making their camera decisions for logical reasons.

About the overall approach, though, I'm wondering if Kate Piecrust has a good point. She said:
"I also find it interesting that a Mars probe ten years from now will, based on how things are done at NASA, likely be sporting the technology available today (...)"

If that's true, NASA might want to examine that, and see if there isn't a more future-proof way to approach this stuff.

(Heck, if it could technically work, there could just be a row of slots in the next rover's arm, ready to have a bunch of top-level phones duct-taped into them. (When one dies, it gets ejected.) To keep things simple, and isolated from the rest of the bot, each phone would have its own tiny solar panel, and an antennae to send its images to the MRO/whatever. (Of course, this is all oversimplified, but I'm of the impression that simplicity is an engineer's main thing. I'd send a camera Barbie.))

By the way, this panorama looks great: http://www.panoramas.dk/mars/curiosity-first-color-360.html
(tons of still images stitched together)

Direct link | Posted on Sep 1, 2012 at 01:58 UTC
On Mars rover camera project manager explains 2MP camera choice news story (187 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dario D: Unlike a lot of commenters, I trust that the Curiosity guys are making their camera decisions for logical reasons.

About the overall approach, though, I'm wondering if Kate Piecrust has a good point. She said:
"I also find it interesting that a Mars probe ten years from now will, based on how things are done at NASA, likely be sporting the technology available today (...)"

If that's true, NASA might want to examine that, and see if there isn't a more future-proof way to approach this stuff.

(Heck, if it could technically work, there could just be a row of slots in the next rover's arm, ready to have a bunch of top-level phones duct-taped into them. (When one dies, it gets ejected.) To keep things simple, and isolated from the rest of the bot, each phone would have its own tiny solar panel, and an antennae to send its images to the MRO/whatever. (Of course, this is all oversimplified, but I'm of the impression that simplicity is an engineer's main thing. I'd send a camera Barbie.))

Well, I'm not saying NASA must make the right decisions just because they're NASA. ;) Like I suggested, there's a good chance it's the *wrong* decision, just that it's made with actual reasoning behind it, not the wild idiocy that some seem to imply. It's like in sports: the coach makes an informed, probably very smart decision, but who's to say it's the RIGHT one? Then, when things go south, the commentators/fans want to lynch the coach, as if he did something *wrong*.

I certainly don't know that NASA did anything wrong here. I'm just saying: I hope they examine their methodology, and make certain they're going in the right direction, for next time. Sending a $2.5 billion probe to Mars with an 8 year-old camera on it sounds a little... off.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 1, 2012 at 00:48 UTC
On Mars rover camera project manager explains 2MP camera choice news story (187 comments in total)

Unlike a lot of commenters, I trust that the Curiosity guys are making their camera decisions for logical reasons.

About the overall approach, though, I'm wondering if Kate Piecrust has a good point. She said:
"I also find it interesting that a Mars probe ten years from now will, based on how things are done at NASA, likely be sporting the technology available today (...)"

If that's true, NASA might want to examine that, and see if there isn't a more future-proof way to approach this stuff.

(Heck, if it could technically work, there could just be a row of slots in the next rover's arm, ready to have a bunch of top-level phones duct-taped into them. (When one dies, it gets ejected.) To keep things simple, and isolated from the rest of the bot, each phone would have its own tiny solar panel, and an antennae to send its images to the MRO/whatever. (Of course, this is all oversimplified, but I'm of the impression that simplicity is an engineer's main thing. I'd send a camera Barbie.))

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2012 at 11:44 UTC as 12th comment | 3 replies
On Canon creates on-screen user-guides for EOS-1D X news story (50 comments in total)

I've long thought that all cameras should have detailed in-camera movies, teaching how to do everything. (These ones look very specific/advanced, but I guess if you're buying a $7,000 camera, you're past the basics. I can't wait til all cameras come with full training.)

Direct link | Posted on Jul 26, 2012 at 11:54 UTC as 7th comment
On Japanese highspeed perspective photo in menghoff's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

Kissing trains. :D
Great shot!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2012 at 07:47 UTC as 1st comment
On The light of god in the Black and white architecture challenge (6 comments in total)

Wow, fantastic shot...

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2012 at 07:45 UTC as 4th comment
On Adobe releases Photoshop CS6 Public Beta news story (22 comments in total)

Yay, new Photoshop. :)
I'm loving the darker interface. It's finally easier to see dark regions in images. (I'm just confused why Photoshop *Elements* got this ability 6 years ago, whereas this extremely expensive pro version of Photoshop has taken this long to catch up.)

On paper, the new features list seems pretty long, but CS6 still feels underwhelming. Consider this: I do heavy photography, digital painting, AND a moderate amount of web/interface design, and none of that is heavily affected in CS6.

I wish Adobe would prioritize these areas:
- Lots of new Filters (like a post-processing studio, lens flare studio, texture stuff...)
- Painting Tools
- A more "buttonized" interface, with less things hidden in "menu closets".
- 100% user-controlled toolbars. (example: I'd like to make myself a painting rack. Also, in the main toolbar, Mixer Brush is currently hidden under Brush. I'd rather make it visible at all times, then pile all of my unused tools "inside" some other button.)

Direct link | Posted on Mar 30, 2012 at 10:31 UTC as 4th comment
On Tamron and Tokina join Micro Four Thirds news story (94 comments in total)

I hope these companies (including Panasonic/Olympus) deeply think about what is said here:
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?55853-Why-have-Micro-4-3-lenses-on-large-body-cams&p=438981

Direct link | Posted on Jan 31, 2012 at 00:02 UTC as 4th comment
On Adobe faces criticism for change of upgrade policy news story (398 comments in total)

Much good on Scott Kelby for doing this.
(btw, his books/stuff helped get me going in photography.)

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2011 at 03:49 UTC as 42nd comment | 1 reply

Oh boy, lots of great info on camera sensors (at least the parts my non-engineer self can follow, lol).
To add to the social issues list, perhaps, here's a big one I've noticed:
It seems camera companies have a deliberate unwillingness (still) to allow Point-&-Shoot cameras to perform in darker environments (like indoors), which likely contributes to this worldwide problem of people having dirt-poor perception of their self-image.

In other words, I believe the horrible results we get from frontal-flash, or underexposed, poor-looking photos, is a worldwide scourge on human self-perception. People already think they're ugly in GOOD shots, so, imagine what must happen when they see themselves portrayed even worse than reality.

Isn't it affordable for a company to just use a lower-megapixel version of even a 3 year-old D-SLR sensor (better low-light), or, for that matter, add a single screw to the onboard flash, allowing it to pivot upward, and become a beautifying bounce flash?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 30, 2011 at 21:19 UTC as 17th comment | 1 reply
Total: 11, showing: 1 – 11