HubertChen

HubertChen

Lives in China Guangzhou, China
Works as a CEO
Joined on Jun 29, 2011

Comments

Total: 596, showing: 81 – 100
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In reply to:

HubertChen: The facts make the intention super clear, that the intended use of the Memorial was Public domain:
1) The Artist Gaylord was paid 0.8 Million USD to create the war memorial for a public park
2) The Artist was contracted directly by US Congress

Leaders lead society by example. The Congress leading by example on how to make law (agreements) to create piece and understanding. The Artists lead by example on how to understand intention and express intention.

Example of Congress: Not capable to manage paperwork necessary to run a public park. Giving away 0.8 Mio USD for Art to be displayed in a public Park and still not having purchased the copyrights is embarrassingly stupid. Also not capable to have a friendly relationship with the Artist.

Example of the Artist: Greedy Slimy Snake. Even he already got paid 0.8 Mio USD and his work is used exactly as intended by his customer, he found a legal way to make something very clear becoming very confusing, complicating the future of others.

...
You can see in responses in this place that for half of the people here this whole thing is very upsetting. Those are the once inexperienced with intellectual property license agreements and they feel it to be counter intuitive and nonsensical.

The other half instead are professionals and they ask: What do you want, this is how it is done.

My point is that it is perhaps time to change the way it is done. To make the standard way of doing business intuitive and the way a paying customer would expect, even and especially he is inexperienced. This would make for a more friendly and happy life for all participants.

We changed it for us, and we and our customers are certainly more happy.

When I was in my twenties I had a major lawsuit every year ( which I usually won). Now I am in my forties and I have not had a lawsuit in the last 10 years and I am a much, much happier person and so are my customers, staying with me for 10 years plus.

I hope this makes more sense now?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 3, 2013 at 15:31 UTC
In reply to:

HubertChen: The facts make the intention super clear, that the intended use of the Memorial was Public domain:
1) The Artist Gaylord was paid 0.8 Million USD to create the war memorial for a public park
2) The Artist was contracted directly by US Congress

Leaders lead society by example. The Congress leading by example on how to make law (agreements) to create piece and understanding. The Artists lead by example on how to understand intention and express intention.

Example of Congress: Not capable to manage paperwork necessary to run a public park. Giving away 0.8 Mio USD for Art to be displayed in a public Park and still not having purchased the copyrights is embarrassingly stupid. Also not capable to have a friendly relationship with the Artist.

Example of the Artist: Greedy Slimy Snake. Even he already got paid 0.8 Mio USD and his work is used exactly as intended by his customer, he found a legal way to make something very clear becoming very confusing, complicating the future of others.

Dear Enconmiast,

Thank you for your detailed and very precise response. I agree with all what you said. I apologize that my previous writing was not clear. I meant the intent of the customer, not the intent from the Artist. Customer being in this case the Congress and the extended customer being the public.

I have been on the selling and contracting end of such intellectual property license agreements for the past 25 years, so you can assume I am sufficiently experienced.

In all this time to anybody who was new to the method that the Artist / photographer remained owner of the intellectual property was not intuitive to the customer and in many cases once the customer understood the idea, he felt cheated.

For ourselves we eventually gave up using this license model, as we considered it more important to keep the customer happy and consider us reasonable and for that reason come back and give us repetitive business.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 3, 2013 at 15:25 UTC
In reply to:

Sirandar: There are 2 camps

Camp 1 will agree because they want creative works to generate as much income as possible in as many ways as possible.

Camp 2 doesn't want to pay directly or indirectly for this.

Basically the US gov made a stupid mistake paying 0.8 million for a public monument and not getting the rights and the artist is cashing in on it.

I would have been interesting to follow the flow of money all though this monument project to see how it flowed and into who's pocket but we will never know that.

Judging from the picture at least the artist is talented .... sometimes we pay 0.8 million for an eyesore.

Thanks Sirandar for this summary

may I add a Camp 3: This should not have gone to court!
Camp 3 agrees in principle on Camp 1. The agreement said that the Artist is still copyright holder. If going to court, copyright law must be uphold, or other Artists lose the only power they have to protect their intellectual property. However in this case the intent for the monument was for use in public domain and using a photograph of it is using it as it was intended in spirit when the whole project was started. That the Artist is now fighting his employer will make those even more hesitating who considered to contract an Artist. This simply makes life harder for those Artists fighting to make a living. More scared patrons = less earning. So Camp three is this should never has gone to court. Who plays on this level has the privilege and responsibility to be a role-model and show how to successfully build Win-Win relationships.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 3, 2013 at 04:03 UTC
In reply to:

HubertChen: The facts make the intention super clear, that the intended use of the Memorial was Public domain:
1) The Artist Gaylord was paid 0.8 Million USD to create the war memorial for a public park
2) The Artist was contracted directly by US Congress

Leaders lead society by example. The Congress leading by example on how to make law (agreements) to create piece and understanding. The Artists lead by example on how to understand intention and express intention.

Example of Congress: Not capable to manage paperwork necessary to run a public park. Giving away 0.8 Mio USD for Art to be displayed in a public Park and still not having purchased the copyrights is embarrassingly stupid. Also not capable to have a friendly relationship with the Artist.

Example of the Artist: Greedy Slimy Snake. Even he already got paid 0.8 Mio USD and his work is used exactly as intended by his customer, he found a legal way to make something very clear becoming very confusing, complicating the future of others.

@Enconmiast
The difference between agreement by the letter and by intent

By the letter:
You are referring to the letter of agreement. As it appears the government was stupid and signed an agreement with the Artist where he still remained sole copyright to the Artwork. But in this case clearly the letter of the agreement is in conflict with the intent of the agreement. This is why all parties involved thought they can take a picture without commission. They thought it is OK and inline with the intent. None of the parties ever had the intention to steal from the party.

Intent:
I am referring to the intent. The Spirit. The core idea. The heart and soul of the agreement. It is about two parties really understand each. They set out to make a Win-Win project and then continue to behave causing Win for the other party.

Win-Win works great. People working happy together. As a result there are usually many follow up projects

I hope this is something you feel is right?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 3, 2013 at 03:40 UTC
In reply to:

HubertChen: The facts make the intention super clear, that the intended use of the Memorial was Public domain:
1) The Artist Gaylord was paid 0.8 Million USD to create the war memorial for a public park
2) The Artist was contracted directly by US Congress

Leaders lead society by example. The Congress leading by example on how to make law (agreements) to create piece and understanding. The Artists lead by example on how to understand intention and express intention.

Example of Congress: Not capable to manage paperwork necessary to run a public park. Giving away 0.8 Mio USD for Art to be displayed in a public Park and still not having purchased the copyrights is embarrassingly stupid. Also not capable to have a friendly relationship with the Artist.

Example of the Artist: Greedy Slimy Snake. Even he already got paid 0.8 Mio USD and his work is used exactly as intended by his customer, he found a legal way to make something very clear becoming very confusing, complicating the future of others.

@ Encomiast

Facts I am referring to that the intended use of the Art was for public domain:
1) The Memorial is placed in a public Park. It is common sense that everything inside a public park is indeed public domain
2) The Artist was contracted directly by US Congress. When the Congress is doing it, it is usually solely for the purpose of creating Art for use in the public domain.

I think these facts are not for dispute. To see the memorial, you need to enter the national park and you can see the signs that you are entering a national park. You may also google it.

Your second statement:
Nobody here has intention to take away earnings from a hard working Artist. Quite the opposite. But this is not what is happening here. It is not that the US government stole creative work from Gaylord. Gaylord was in fact paid eight hundred thousands USD for his work by the government to put it into public domain. His actions are making it harder for Artists like you to get contracts.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 3, 2013 at 03:21 UTC
In reply to:

mausta: It is pretty clear.
IF the Government had purchased the copyright to this sculpture then the artist would not have any claim.
Likewise if someone commissioned an artist (you) to make a work of art, then printed millions of copies of it and made over 17 million dollars, WITHOUT PURCHASING the copyright from you, don't you think they would owe you some of that money?
The reason there is copyright protection is because of instances such as this!
The artist is not to blame, he is exercising his (copy) rights to his original creation. Again if the govt. had purchased these rights from the artist he would not have the copy"RIGHT" anymore!!!! Don't bash the artist, he apparently still holds the copyright.
All of this bitching and moaning about how we can't take pictures of anything because someone else made it is absurd. Copyright law defines what is and what is not protected. If you are profiting from your photography better consult the copyright law or better yet a copyright lawyer.

What is sh10453 says is all technically correct and it is a way to make more money and unfortunately it is also a way of doing business which is common place. You do this, you will have more money short term.

You do this, you will upset lots of people. Because the only way to get this money is through litigation, as it is counter intuitive.

Inexperienced customers will sign your agreement and you will need to wait and watch them if they give you a chance to litigate them for more money due to copyright infringement.

Experienced customers will not sign with you such agreements. Experienced customers are the onee who would bring repeated business and are the ones you actually would want to attract.

Last but not least, simply think on the counter intuitive aspect. It is not helping your relationships if you make agreement where you make people believe they get a) and you know you only want to give b) and later fight your customers when using a)

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2013 at 01:19 UTC

The facts make the intention super clear, that the intended use of the Memorial was Public domain:
1) The Artist Gaylord was paid 0.8 Million USD to create the war memorial for a public park
2) The Artist was contracted directly by US Congress

Leaders lead society by example. The Congress leading by example on how to make law (agreements) to create piece and understanding. The Artists lead by example on how to understand intention and express intention.

Example of Congress: Not capable to manage paperwork necessary to run a public park. Giving away 0.8 Mio USD for Art to be displayed in a public Park and still not having purchased the copyrights is embarrassingly stupid. Also not capable to have a friendly relationship with the Artist.

Example of the Artist: Greedy Slimy Snake. Even he already got paid 0.8 Mio USD and his work is used exactly as intended by his customer, he found a legal way to make something very clear becoming very confusing, complicating the future of others.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2013 at 00:49 UTC as 14th comment | 7 replies
On Tribute in Light, 2013 in the My best picture this week challenge (22 comments in total)

Yesterday I could browse Bob Tullis pictures in his gallery in dpreview. Today they are all 404 not found :-(

Direct link | Posted on Oct 1, 2013 at 17:32 UTC as 2nd comment
On Tribute in Light, 2013 in the My best picture this week challenge (22 comments in total)
In reply to:

HubertChen: Dear Bob,

Thank you for this inspirational shot. It taught me how you can shoot Ansel Adams style with light enough gear and in a not too time consuming way. To me your technique is striking the perfect balance between cost, weight of gear and achieved quality. Thank you for this very valuable lesson!

Thank you also for your gallery. I truly enjoyed studying your body of work.

Also thank you so much to share this in full resolution!

I have a question for your: Can you send me a link to a near far shot of yours with this lens which is shot in daylight. I like to have a better understanding how the real world resolution of this lens is in daylight. I am thinking to buy a lens in this focal range, which I have never considered before and hope you can help me to better understand what can be accomplished. Is it possible that at f/8 at 8mm you have a pixel sharp rendition from near to far on APS-C?

Thanks,

Hubert

ah, and when researching, I found a review of your lens on photozone: http://www.photozone.de/canon-eos/526-samyang8f35eos

I am not sure if you are interested in this kind of things, but if you are, photozone makes excellent and very critical reviews and their review shows that your lens is extremely sharp. It has some lens aberrations (which is common for fisheye lenses), however you can eliminate those in post processing.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 1, 2013 at 17:26 UTC
On Tribute in Light, 2013 in the My best picture this week challenge (22 comments in total)
In reply to:

HubertChen: Dear Bob,

Thank you for this inspirational shot. It taught me how you can shoot Ansel Adams style with light enough gear and in a not too time consuming way. To me your technique is striking the perfect balance between cost, weight of gear and achieved quality. Thank you for this very valuable lesson!

Thank you also for your gallery. I truly enjoyed studying your body of work.

Also thank you so much to share this in full resolution!

I have a question for your: Can you send me a link to a near far shot of yours with this lens which is shot in daylight. I like to have a better understanding how the real world resolution of this lens is in daylight. I am thinking to buy a lens in this focal range, which I have never considered before and hope you can help me to better understand what can be accomplished. Is it possible that at f/8 at 8mm you have a pixel sharp rendition from near to far on APS-C?

Thanks,

Hubert

Dear Bob,

Thanks for your reply and for your link to your Fish-eye Set on your flickr account. I found your lake pictures and technically it showed me what I was looking for. Foreground is sharp as well as background down to pixel level. It was a pity that I could not find the metadata in flickr, nor could I really zoom to pixel level. I needed to use this funny slideshow and hope it is panning at about pixel level. I miss the more simple and more practical flickr UI, where I could get those basic information.

However, sharpness already looked better than what I expected.

I actually was not looking for a fisheye. I would be buying a rectilinear lens. I will go for the Sigma 8-16mm. Important is that your pictures have shown me how to take great looking pictures at 8mm focal lengths. I never have seen any good ones before, but yours are truly inspiring and have shown me the way! Thank you so much!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 1, 2013 at 17:22 UTC
On Tribute in Light, 2013 in the My best picture this week challenge (22 comments in total)

Dear Bob,

Thank you for this inspirational shot. It taught me how you can shoot Ansel Adams style with light enough gear and in a not too time consuming way. To me your technique is striking the perfect balance between cost, weight of gear and achieved quality. Thank you for this very valuable lesson!

Thank you also for your gallery. I truly enjoyed studying your body of work.

Also thank you so much to share this in full resolution!

I have a question for your: Can you send me a link to a near far shot of yours with this lens which is shot in daylight. I like to have a better understanding how the real world resolution of this lens is in daylight. I am thinking to buy a lens in this focal range, which I have never considered before and hope you can help me to better understand what can be accomplished. Is it possible that at f/8 at 8mm you have a pixel sharp rendition from near to far on APS-C?

Thanks,

Hubert

Direct link | Posted on Sep 30, 2013 at 08:10 UTC as 5th comment | 3 replies

Creative shot, creative PP and creative Title. Simply wonderful. Thanks for sharing and congrats to deserved win.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 27, 2013 at 07:21 UTC as 3rd comment
On Languid in the Any Animal in ZOO challenge (12 comments in total)

Wonderful idea and execution. Thanks for sharing and congrats for deserved win!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 27, 2013 at 07:19 UTC as 4th comment
In reply to:

abortabort: Seriously? The 16-28mm is a great lens, but 5 TIMES the price?! Samyang's cine versions are something like $50 more, if that. I suppose this will still be cheaper than the competition though.

@ abortabort: The mechanical design of cine lenses is unfortunately complex and so is their manufacturing, assembling and testing. Combine with with small production qty to amortize the high development cost and then it makes sense.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2013 at 15:19 UTC
In reply to:

CarVac: They may have reworked some of the mechanisms to provide for parfocal zooming. That would certainly account for an increased price.

Tighter tolerances for cine lenses should be irrelevant due to the significantly lower resolution.

More relevant is the complete different mechanical design. For once to offer the cine form factor of larger housing plus gears. Plus a different focal mechanism to avoid breathing when focusing and breathing when zooming. This is lots of design engineering, production engineering and development of test equipment to do manufacturing testing which need to be paid for by a relatively small sales qty. Thus the steep price increase.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2013 at 15:16 UTC
In reply to:

Langusta: I'm guessing Tokina's extra-high CA's are included free of charge here?

They could become irrelevant. A 2 pixel CA at 16 MP APS-C should be something like 0.3 pixel on HD resolution full screen :-)

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2013 at 15:11 UTC
In reply to:

photoramone: no tokina for pentax??

The Pentax 12-24 mm f/4 lens is a Tokina OEM design. But Tokina itself has no K mount in the current line out. The newer and outstanding 11-16 mm however has not been adopted by Pentax. I am waiting for that one since years.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2013 at 15:09 UTC
On From Dusk Till Dawn in the My best picture this week challenge (8 comments in total)
In reply to:

joger: thx to everybody for the nice feedback!!

It is right - it is indeed the Speicherstadt in Hamburg.

Technical notes:

Almost no PP - but stitching four images from my TS-E 90 fully shifted ±60 ° and the recombined in PS CS6 (until then no treatment of the files except opening and standard RAW conversion in LR5). Stitching of four images in PS CS6 (no tilting or movement of the camera) - emulating a virtual sensor size of 34 x 54 mm with 46 MPixel (the shift path of the TS-E 90 is 1 mm smaller compare to the TS-E 17 and 24 II)

Reimport into LR 5 and a bit of contrast, exposure and unsharpening - nothing fancy - in total maybe some 30-50 seconds of post processing effort.

The final image has a size of 8600 x 5350 (real) pixels and the downsizing makes the very sharp image even sharper at 1600 pixel width.

As the rules for the challenges demand - no major PP.

Hope this explains the production process. (feel free to send me a PM if you want to know more)

Thanks so much for the detailed explanation. Congrats for this wonderful image and its deserved win. I particularly like the highlight roll off. It makes me feel like I am there :-)

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2013 at 11:38 UTC
In reply to:

VadymA: I was surprised to see how aged their equipment is; by the look it is probably from the 80's. No wonder they have to test every lens. Still koodos to Sigma for producing some nice lenses on such dated equipment.

I am not sure what your experience is. I inspect lots of factories and this Sigma factory would be one of the most modern factories I have ever seen!

Please also do not confuse wear and tear with age.

Last but not least, it is not relevant how old a machine is, rather how it is maintained and calibrated. And by the looks of it Sigma factory management is very organized and structured, thus they would have a great maintenance program.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 22, 2013 at 09:41 UTC

Great Article, great photos, interesting writing. Thanks to the Author for all the work and thanks to dpreview for sharing it here.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 22, 2013 at 05:16 UTC as 12th comment
Total: 596, showing: 81 – 100
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