sean000

Lives in United States Bellingham, USA, WA, United States
Works as a Technology - IT Support
Joined on Feb 16, 2005
About me:

35mm f/2.0D
50mm f/1.8D
90mm f/2.8 1:1 Macro (Tamron)
80-200 f/2.8D
300mm f/4 AFS
Kenko Tele Pro 300 1.4x TC
Speedlight SB-800 & SB-600 Flashes
Gitzo 1227 Tripod with Markins M10 Ballhead

Comments

Total: 95, showing: 21 – 40
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In other words... we can market only one technical specification number at a time to non-enthusiast consumers. After years of telling consumers that it's all about the megapixel count, we now want them to know that it's about the sensor size.

The larger issue that these companies face is that the market has reached a point when the current technology is good enough for most consumers, so it will be tougher to sell them on future upgrades. Enthusiasts will continue to get excited about what's new, but the general consumer market is much greater in number. For many of them, the image quality is already good enough... especially when you're just going to dirty it up with an Instagram filter and share it on Facebook. The biggest complaint my non-enthusiast friends have about their phones or P&S cameras is that they aren't responsive enough. They care more about getting the shot quickly (and in focus) than they care about the image quality.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2013 at 15:30 UTC as 57th comment | 3 replies
On article 5 Reasons why I haven't used my DSLR for months (597 comments in total)

I've been shooting mostly with m4/3 since 2010. I bought a GF1 as a walk-around alternative to my Nikon DSLR, but I kept buying m4/3 lenses and eventually the OM-D E-M5. I still have my DSLR, but it's strictly a specialty camera now. I mainly keep it because I have some nice Nikon lenses (like f/2.8 zooms) and several Nikon flashguns. DSLR cameras still have some advantages of course, but I think most people who buy entry level DSLR cameras would be happier with m4/3, Sony NEX, etc.

Link | Posted on Jul 31, 2013 at 23:32 UTC as 178th comment
On article Hands-on with Eye-Fi Mobi (43 comments in total)

I currently use a Toshiba Flashair card with my wife's Olympus XZ-10. Like the Mobi the Flashair has its own SSID so she can connect directly to that from her iPhone. There is an Olympus camera app that can download JPEGs. The annoying step for her is that before she can transfer she has to go to the Menu and enable the camera/Flashair wireless before she can connect from her phone. That's not really a big deal when you are transferring a batch of photos, but it's a lot of button presses to transfer a single photo.

If I understand the Mobi, the only real difference is that it's always on and available for connections without having to enable the wireless in the camera menu? That would make things more streamlined for her.

As far as syncing images between devices: iOS users can use Photostream to sync photos between an iPhone and iPad (or even multiple users via a shared photostream). Users of different devices can use Dropbox or Google to sync.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2013 at 23:43 UTC as 19th comment
On article Best Digital Cameras for Kids (145 comments in total)
In reply to:

jtan163: My nephew is 5 and has been using my D7000 and EM5 since he was 3.
I put it in Aperture priory or auto and he is fine.
Actually now he chooses his own settings.
He likes the blinkies on
At the moment he doesn't understand wat they are but he insists on turning them on.

I require him to wear a neck strap to reduce the risk of dropping, and he is happy to do it.
The images aren't masterly, but he can shoot a focusses shot.

I bet by the time he is 10 they will be masterly.

My only mistake was assuming he'd stick to what I showed him.

He didn't. Kids mimic.
He attempted to out an SD card in my EM5. Backwards.

Now I need to use a key or other edge to remove SD cards, because the push to eject spring mechanism is seriously fritzed (he managed to get that SD card ALL the way in backwards).

He is now not allowed to open doors on the camera, so batteries, memory cars and USB etc ports are out of bounds.

So if you show your kids camera stuff, make limits.

I'm afraid to let my 3-year-old use my E-M5 even though she knows how to use it (while daddy is holding onto it) and she is quite careful for an almost-3-year-old. I would be more comfortable letting her use my Nikon D200 since it's a little more drop resistant, but it's heavy so I think I will get her a compact P&S off Craigslist for $25. I see a 12 MP Kodak EasyShare on there now for $30. That might just be a good 3rd birthday gift for her :-)

Good tips on setting limits and not showing them too much. Of course kids will explore and figure out a lot of it on their own, so it might take some coaching to get her to avoid messing with cards and batteries.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2013 at 16:13 UTC
On article Best Digital Cameras for Kids (145 comments in total)
In reply to:

sean000: My kid has the Vtech, and it is crap. Yes it is really designed to be a toy, but they could have included a better camera. The image quality is... probably worse than the first cell phone camera. It's that bad. I think my first VGA webcam produced better photos. It's also chock full of silly effects and games that my daughter has zero interest in, because they just aren't that fun. She does like looking through the dual-viewfinders. It's actually good for a 2-year-old who is more interested in looking through a viewfinder or just having a camera that she can hold and press the buttons for (as opposed to "Daddy's camera").

Now that she is 3 years old, she is starting to pay attention to the actual results of taking a photo, and she is starting to realize that the Vtech takes lousy pictures. Now she uses one of our old iPhone 3g phones in a drop-resistant case. You'd think for $40 VTech could have included a camera that is at least on par with a 2008 cell phone.

Oh...I should add that the VTech isn't really any easier to use than a real compact P&S. My daughter will turn 3 in two months, and she can figure out how to operate our "real" cameras. She knows where the shutter is, and what the Play button looks like for reviewing photos. She can also take photos and review them easily on an iPhone (has been able to do that for at least a year). So I think her next camera will be a compact P&S off Craigslist for $25. That should buy a better camera than the iPhone 3G, far better than the VTech. She will be able to get real results, and if she breaks it then it is no big loss...and will teach her how to treat things like that carefully.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2013 at 16:03 UTC
On article Best Digital Cameras for Kids (145 comments in total)

My kid has the Vtech, and it is crap. Yes it is really designed to be a toy, but they could have included a better camera. The image quality is... probably worse than the first cell phone camera. It's that bad. I think my first VGA webcam produced better photos. It's also chock full of silly effects and games that my daughter has zero interest in, because they just aren't that fun. She does like looking through the dual-viewfinders. It's actually good for a 2-year-old who is more interested in looking through a viewfinder or just having a camera that she can hold and press the buttons for (as opposed to "Daddy's camera").

Now that she is 3 years old, she is starting to pay attention to the actual results of taking a photo, and she is starting to realize that the Vtech takes lousy pictures. Now she uses one of our old iPhone 3g phones in a drop-resistant case. You'd think for $40 VTech could have included a camera that is at least on par with a 2008 cell phone.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2013 at 15:58 UTC as 55th comment | 5 replies
On article Leica announces X Vario zoom compact with APS-C sensor (757 comments in total)

At least it's not as ugly as the Hasselblad Lunar :-D

I knew the red dot would translate to "Expensive Panasonic Lumix, but dang that's one pricey camera for what it is! The protruding, yet slow, lens puts it in the same size class as a mirrorless interchangeable lens camera, which (as countless others have already pointed out) will be much cheaper with the included kit zoom. The difference in price would pay for some fast lenses.

The next question is: How much are they asking for a re-branded Panasonic LVF2?

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2013 at 15:48 UTC as 267th comment | 1 reply

I don't care if he invented the GIF... "JIF" still sounds wrong. Is the 'G' sound in "Graphic Interchange Format" a soft 'G'? No! You don't say "Jiraphic Interchange format," so why would you say "JIF?"

I think Mr. Wilhite has a sadistic, yet patient, tendency. He waits 25 years to settle the debate, only to say that the least logical option is the correct one. Grrr

Link | Posted on May 22, 2013 at 23:33 UTC as 51st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: And of course, if you want to transfer say 8gigs of raw photos from say an SD card, you'll need a specialized card reader that can plug into the iPad's Apple only port.

Will Adobe be supplying these special card readers or some kind of dock? Why not just stick with a Mac Air or good Windows tablet, or small Windows laptop? (I know that this small laptop/capable tablet point has already been made elsewhere in these comments.)

And no, I don't want to read the preposterous assertion that it's simple and quick to transfer several gigs of data over wifi--perhaps in 20 years, but then photo files will be even bigger.

The idea is that you wouldn't need to transfer full res RAW files to the iPad (although they say you could if you wanted to... and the demo shows a full res RAW file). What he suggests in the video is that mobile Lightroom will read the RAW file and transfer a smaller/lower RES version to the iPad. He says it's not the preview JPEG, but an actual lower res RAW file (doesn't say how it's accomplished). That wouldn't be great for detail work like sharpening and noise reduction, but it would be adequate for Library module work like culling, tagging, etc.; as well as for basic Development module adjustments like exposure and cropping. The full-size RAW files get copied to your desktop computer, and Mobile Lightroom only needs to sync the text that contains your library and development work from the iPad. I would love to do the tagging, culling, and basic development on my iPad.

Link | Posted on May 5, 2013 at 05:36 UTC

I would love to be able to use both the library module and do some development work as well on my iPad. I'd probably use it for initial culling, flagging, tagging, and perhaps some basic development work. I don't spend as much time at my computer these days, so it would be nice to just focus on the final development steps (including editing with my Nik plugins) and printing when I'm at my computer. The killer workflow would be to use the Lightroom iOS app to download lower resolution versions from a WiFi SD card, doing all that first level library and development work on the iPad, and then download the full size files to my computer (from the SD Card) followed by syncing up the editing steps from my iPad. That would rock.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2013 at 21:32 UTC as 14th comment
In reply to:

sean000: I think this is a sign that Google is preparing to integrate Nik-like development capabilities into Picasa (or perhaps a "Picasa-Pro" premium version). Step 1: Get the Lightroom users hooked on all the Nik products. Step 2: Offer a new premium Picasa application that has the organizational and workflow features of Lightroom, but with the Nik products fully integrated. Throw in huge amounts of online storage for a premium Google Drive / Google+ account. Step 3: Make it possible to go cloud-based with full features. Google has doing a lot to make Google+ attractive to serious photographers, so it only makes sense that they want to compete with Adobe (at least Lightroom), and offer the kind of cloud-based (and potentially collaborative) experience currently lacking from Lightroom. That said I love using Lightroom (as well as my Nik plugins), so I will wait until Google offers me a Terabyte of online storage and I have the bandwidth to use it.

You're correct HiRez... Picasa isn't anywhere close to Lightroom at this time, but I wouldn't be surprised if we see a "Picasa Pro" or some other named product before too long.

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2013 at 03:06 UTC
In reply to:

sean000: I think this is a sign that Google is preparing to integrate Nik-like development capabilities into Picasa (or perhaps a "Picasa-Pro" premium version). Step 1: Get the Lightroom users hooked on all the Nik products. Step 2: Offer a new premium Picasa application that has the organizational and workflow features of Lightroom, but with the Nik products fully integrated. Throw in huge amounts of online storage for a premium Google Drive / Google+ account. Step 3: Make it possible to go cloud-based with full features. Google has doing a lot to make Google+ attractive to serious photographers, so it only makes sense that they want to compete with Adobe (at least Lightroom), and offer the kind of cloud-based (and potentially collaborative) experience currently lacking from Lightroom. That said I love using Lightroom (as well as my Nik plugins), so I will wait until Google offers me a Terabyte of online storage and I have the bandwidth to use it.

@pedroboe100: And it comes with 1 TB of Google Drive storage for 3 years! I'm telling ya... they could probably sell me pretty easily on a Pixel with 1 TB online storage and cloud-based photo-management/development with tools as powerful and Lightroom and Nik. It's only a matter of time before they lay all their cards on the table and go after Lightroom users full-tilt.

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2013 at 00:08 UTC

I think this is a sign that Google is preparing to integrate Nik-like development capabilities into Picasa (or perhaps a "Picasa-Pro" premium version). Step 1: Get the Lightroom users hooked on all the Nik products. Step 2: Offer a new premium Picasa application that has the organizational and workflow features of Lightroom, but with the Nik products fully integrated. Throw in huge amounts of online storage for a premium Google Drive / Google+ account. Step 3: Make it possible to go cloud-based with full features. Google has doing a lot to make Google+ attractive to serious photographers, so it only makes sense that they want to compete with Adobe (at least Lightroom), and offer the kind of cloud-based (and potentially collaborative) experience currently lacking from Lightroom. That said I love using Lightroom (as well as my Nik plugins), so I will wait until Google offers me a Terabyte of online storage and I have the bandwidth to use it.

Link | Posted on Mar 25, 2013 at 21:28 UTC as 78th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

BigEnso: Bummer. I hope they send a second notice. I found the email in my Gmail spam folder and since it did look like spam ( I am overly cautious), I deleted it rather than sending it to trash so it is beyond recovery. Evidently the email link is the only way in to get the free bundle if you already have some of the apps.

I found my notice in the spam folder as well. GMail said it appeared to be a phishing scam. You'd think they'd whitelist their own sender accounts.

Link | Posted on Mar 25, 2013 at 19:59 UTC
Total: 95, showing: 21 – 40
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