EarthQuake

EarthQuake

Joined on May 16, 2010

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Total: 29, showing: 1 – 20
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On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III First Impressions Review preview (2970 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: Strachen:

And more zoom added to the detractions of the RX100 and RX100ii.

And I want fewer pixels and better lowlight performance, I sure hope Sony listens to the likes of me and not this silly more zoom thing. Sony used to always go for more zoom, and it got Sony ignored by people interested in seriously good cameras.

As for this particular Sony sensor, the new Nikon One v3 and the Samsung NX-mini both appear to seriously threaten this Sony's sensor.

The NX mini's lens is two stops slower than the RX100MK3, so any slight advantage the Samsung has at high ISO is moot. Its also bigger and doesn't have an EVF.

Direct link | Posted on May 25, 2014 at 03:05 UTC
On Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R real-world samples gallery article (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: 8 or 10 raws for download, please.

These jpegs look decidedly unimpressive on a 15" MacBook retina. Hoping the raws would be better.

Contrast ratio is a useless marketing term and most manufacturers make up/have their own standards for the measurements. Its not a reliable spec because you can't compare it directly, it would be sort of like if some camera manufacturers measured ISO in a different way.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contrast_ratio

Contrast ratio shouldn't have any bearing on monitor selection when color accuracy is the goal, many manufacturers pump up the contrast so the screen looks more "vivid" to the average consumer, but the color accuracy on these displays tends to be worse. Lower end panels often have higher contrast ratio ratings, because its an easy spec (even if it means very little) to sell to a consumer.

What your monitor's contrast ratio spec is, is really neither here nor there, and has no bearing on color depth.

Direct link | Posted on May 4, 2014 at 15:46 UTC
On Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R real-world samples gallery article (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: 8 or 10 raws for download, please.

These jpegs look decidedly unimpressive on a 15" MacBook retina. Hoping the raws would be better.

32 bit is typically what your color setting will say(as apposed to 16/24 bit), which is 8+8+8+ 8 bit alpha. I highly doubt it says 32 bit *per channel*, if it does, take a screenshot.

eg: http://www.guidingtech.com/9914/change-from-16-bit-to-32-bit-color-windows-7/

Virtually every monitor made in the last 10-15 years can run in 32bit "truecolor" mode (even if some can't display all the colors, ie cheap 6bit per channel TN/e-IPS monitors)

"As of 2012 many modern desktop systems (Mac OS X, GNOME, KDE, Windows XP/Vista/7, etc...) offer an option for 24-bit truecolor with 8 bits for an alpha channel, which is referred to as "32-bit color" or the RGBA color space. Switching to an 8/16/24-bit color option in those systems generally disables transparency/translucency effects, and the only reduction in color depth is seen when going to 8/16-bit color."

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_depth

Direct link | Posted on May 4, 2014 at 15:41 UTC
On Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R real-world samples gallery article (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: 8 or 10 raws for download, please.

These jpegs look decidedly unimpressive on a 15" MacBook retina. Hoping the raws would be better.

Ah, here is a PDF from HP that should clear it all up. They specifically reference 30 bit (in reality 10+10+10) as apposed to 24 bit (in reality 8+8+8) when talking about "30 bit" dreamcolor monitors. http://www.hp.com/united-states/campaigns/workstations/pdfs/lp2480zx-30-bit-panel.pdf

It also references 18bit (in reality 6+6+6) bit monitors, which most cheap TN based monitors are, and even some e-IPS monitors like the dell U2311H etc.

No place in this PDF does HP claim 90/96 bit depth.

I will be happy to provide sources of information about the 6/8/10 bit depth per channel of various different panel types.

Again, a 10bit per channel (30bit total) monitor means you have a high quality, professional monitor, so I am sure it looks nice. But you do not have anything exceptional or rare, as Dell(U2413) and Eizo also offer hardware with the same specs. Possibly even the same panel, as only a few companies actually manufacture monitor panels (Samsung and LG are a couple examples).

Direct link | Posted on May 4, 2014 at 00:42 UTC
On Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R real-world samples gallery article (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: 8 or 10 raws for download, please.

These jpegs look decidedly unimpressive on a 15" MacBook retina. Hoping the raws would be better.

Please provide reference for the specific software (and where) it claims this is 96 bit. As again, no other resource on the internet makes the same claim (if you can find that, I would be interested as well).

Direct link | Posted on May 4, 2014 at 00:34 UTC
On Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R real-world samples gallery article (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: 8 or 10 raws for download, please.

These jpegs look decidedly unimpressive on a 15" MacBook retina. Hoping the raws would be better.

http://www.trustedreviews.com/HP-DreamColor-LP2480zx---24in-Professional-LCD-Display_Monitor_review

http://www.prad.de/en/monitore/review/2009/review-hp-lp2480zx.html

Even more THIRD PARTY sources listing the LP2480zx as a 10-bit per channel (30 bit total) monitor.

http://www.colorwiki.com/wiki/HP_LP2480zx_Dreamcolor

Make sure to read past the "from HP" marketing info. 12-bit LUT, 10-bit interface.

I've yet to find a single source that lists this monitor as "90bit". Please provide me with such a source if you intend to keep this up.

Direct link | Posted on May 3, 2014 at 00:28 UTC
On Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R real-world samples gallery article (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: 8 or 10 raws for download, please.

These jpegs look decidedly unimpressive on a 15" MacBook retina. Hoping the raws would be better.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1010658-REG/hp_gv546a4_aba_hp_lp2480zx_24.html 12 bit lookup table, 10bit/per channel color, again similar to every other high end monitor on the market.

Again, computer monitors are typically specified by color per channel, not total color for all 3 channels, which is the only difference between my 10bit and your 30 bit number.

If you want to call it "30bit" that's fine I guess, but you're already adding up all 3 10 bit channels. You don't multiply it again by 3, because that makes no sense.

32 bit float gives you a data range of -3.4E+38 to +3.4E+38, which is a much, much, MUCH higher value range than you can represent on any current hardware. But somehow you think you've got a 90/96 bit monitor? How many values can your monitor display? What GPU can actually push anything close to that amount of values to the display?

Do you realize that you're basically the only person on the internet making this claim? Go ahead, google 90/96bit monitor.

Direct link | Posted on May 3, 2014 at 00:12 UTC
On Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R real-world samples gallery article (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: 8 or 10 raws for download, please.

These jpegs look decidedly unimpressive on a 15" MacBook retina. Hoping the raws would be better.

Also that HP monitor is a 10Bit per-channel monitor, equivalent to most high end panels, they're just doing the same 3x math you are for marketing purposes and calling it 30 bit. Nothing new there. When you talk about bit-depth for monitors, the standard term is per channel. You can't just 3x everything and pretend like its something new. Look up the specs on B&H, clearly 10/12 bit like all other pro type monitors.

Direct link | Posted on May 2, 2014 at 20:41 UTC
On Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R real-world samples gallery article (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: 8 or 10 raws for download, please.

These jpegs look decidedly unimpressive on a 15" MacBook retina. Hoping the raws would be better.

And which monitor do you have again?

Direct link | Posted on May 2, 2014 at 20:36 UTC
On Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R real-world samples gallery article (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: 8 or 10 raws for download, please.

These jpegs look decidedly unimpressive on a 15" MacBook retina. Hoping the raws would be better.

Not sure what fantasy world you live in, but you do not have a 96bit monitor, because such a thing does not exist. Most high end monitors use 8-10bit panels, and even the most expensive professional monitors are 12bit at most.

Direct link | Posted on May 2, 2014 at 03:30 UTC
On Hands-on with the Nikon D3300 and 35mm F1.8G lens article (142 comments in total)
In reply to:

revio: DPR says: "The D3300 continues to be one of the smallest and lightest digital SLRs on the market"

How can a NEW camera "continue to be one of the smallest..."???

Since it´s not been existing until now, it can´t of course...

The D3300 seems, anyway, to be a nice and capable camera, and notably smaller than its predecessor was.

A. The Nikon D3XXX line has always been on the small side, this is the latest in that series.
B. ballwin12 - What part about "one of the smallest" confused you? It is *one* of the smallest DSLR, I haven't seen anyone claim it is smaller than the SL1.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2014 at 02:28 UTC
In reply to:

Lucas_: Although a bit heavy for an f4, the 70-200 would be a great option for Sony folks, if priced right. Currently there are only huge/expensive f2.8 choices on that range from Sony, Sigma and Tamron.

The Tamron 70-200/2.8 is 1112g/201mm vs this Tokina lens at 1020g/168mm, so barely any size/weight gain.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2013 at 15:57 UTC
In reply to:

yabokkie: Sony E20/2.8 is equivalent to about 31mm f/4.3 on 35mm format.
Sony E24/1.8 is about 37mm f/2.8,
Canon M22/2 is about 35mm f/3.2, and
Pana G20/1.7 is about 39mm f/3.3.

compared to the last three, E20/2.8 is wider and darker.
all these lenses are very easy and very cheap to make, and
I think they are all quite handy to use, even for indoor if you don't mind IQ.

Any exposure benefit you get from using a 1.7 lens on M43 vs a 2.8 lens on APS-C is pretty much moot, because sony's APS-C sensors give you on average about 1 stop better ISO performance than the best M43 sensors.

So a M43rds 20mm lens at 2.0 and iso 800 and an APS-C 20mm lens at 2.8 and ISO 1600 are generally going to take the same photo in terms of quality, noise, dof, etc. All things being equal of course(lens quality, you'll have to step back a little with the M43 to get the same framing).

So the 20/1.7 gives you a half stop benefit. Hooray!

My mirrorless camera is an OMD with 20/1.7 + 45/1.8 btw, just so you guys don't think I'm hating on M43. I do understand the differences though, and I think its important, if a bit esoteric.

With static scenes the IBIS on Oly cameras makes a much much bigger difference than a 1.7 M43 and 2.8 APS lens. On Pana bodies, its moot(unless you have an OS lens). With moving subjects, its moot.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 23, 2013 at 18:34 UTC
In reply to:

Jefftan: biggest problem is no OSS
no use at high ISO at night

So you carry around a tripod, with your pocket sized camera and lenses? What is the point then? Just bring a DSLR if you're going to be lugging around a tripod.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 23, 2013 at 18:25 UTC
In reply to:

HubertChen: I shoot regularly with Pentax prime lenses on Sony NEX. This is already fun and image quality is superb and comparable to what my friend shoots with his Canon 5D, which will make the NEX / Pentax Prime combo look like a dwarf. This adapter would shift favors even more to the NEX. I am wondering why the Pentax K-Mount is not considered yet. They have excellent primes at diminishing size and low cots. Ideal for NEX and Metabones adapter.

You can get a cheap PK to EF adapter and use it with the Canon version of this adapter, as long as your PK lens has an aperture ring.

Same with Olympus OM, M42 screw mount, Contax/Yashica C/Y mount, Kodak/Voigtlander DKL mount, Leica R, and probably a few more, all with infinity focus. Really anything that can be converted to EF mount without correct glass will work.

No AF though obviously.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 15, 2013 at 17:50 UTC
On Just Posted: Enthusiast Zoom Compact Camera Roundup article (124 comments in total)
In reply to:

vassilis gazelos: Hi all, I'm trying to decide on a new compact/bridge camera and this review came out on time even though it doesn't inlcude the bridge/large zoom cameras! I don't have first hand real life experience of either of these so I'm trying to narrow down the selection from the reviews and comments. I'm looking for the best image quality, full manual control, widest angle 24mm/25mm, long exposure, braketing. I was considering the FZ200 or SX50HS however these have significnalty smaller sensors than the ones reviewed in this article. Could anyone assist me with some real life experience and regardless of the budget how these different types compare. Is the image quality (and Depth of Field) of the comeras here noticeably better?
P.S> The only reference I have is via a friend's Canon older Gseries which produced some relay good results (I don't rememer the widest angle though).
My experience ranges from a SLR Canon F1 (multiple lenses) to a point a shoot Sony DSC T7
Thank you

when you compare M43 vs NEX with similar lenses, the M43 combo is almost universally smaller. Say M43 with 45/1.8 vs Nex with 50/1.8, M43 with 20/1.7 pancake vs NEX with 35/1.8, 24/2 or 30/2.8. Even when you compare larger bodies like the OMD vs the Tiny Nex 3/5 the M43 is about the same size or smaller with similar lenses. If you take the compact M43 bodies the size is smaller than NEX. Sure the NEX may be smaller in height, but what does that give you with a large lens attached? The Sony 16-50mm and the not very good 16mm prime lenses are the only NEX lenses that really compete on size.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 26, 2012 at 01:10 UTC
On Just posted: Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM lens review article (182 comments in total)
In reply to:

itsastickup: Totally hopeless bokeh test.

For me it's a deal-breaker: bad bokeh means unusable portraits.

Closing down the aperture can get rid of hard edged rings but also double-line 'nissen' bokeh which make for poor/disturbing bokeh as in the two pics (I would call this bokeh 'poor' and unusable). Typically I shoot f1.4 lenses at f2 for bokeh reasons. But in addition, you are more likely to get rings where the focus is at a distance and the blur moderate, as with these pics, while at close portrait distances the rings may not be so hard; which is the type of photos I am most interested in.

On top of that: a closed down aperture can be useful (one doesn;t always want obliteration-bokeh) but the bokeh can deteriorate.

So effectively we need a range of apertures and distance to know what the bokeh situation is.

Bokeh is so neglected that I have to do a lot of research to work out whether a lens is any good. It's a pain.

Compare the sigma's bokeh to other common 35/1.4 lens, in any situation where the sigma's bokeh looks bad, it would look bad with the 35L, Nikon 35/1.4, CZ etc. None of these fast wides provide amazing bokeh and busy backgrounds will make them all look bad. You have to compare the sigma subjectively to other lenses, IE: taking photos of the same thing, same camera, same settings. You can find bad bokeh examples of any 35/1.4 if thats what you're looking for. The Sigma may be very slightly worse than other 35/1.4's, but unusable is a huge overstatement.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 22, 2012 at 19:04 UTC
On Just Posted: Sony Alpha SLT-A99 review article (498 comments in total)
In reply to:

RStyga: An upper IQ limit of ISP 6400, and then it gets visibly worse than the competition.

Typical Sony DSLR IQ... strong sensor manufacturer but somehow they mess up when using them in their DSLR.. it doesn't make sense...

Sony has IBIS so in certain situations with certain lenses(IE fast primes which hardly any of canon or nikon's lenses come with IS) you'll be able to use a couple stops lower ISO. Not for fast moving subjects of course but it still helps in a lot of situations.

So a 1/2 stop iso penalty can be overcome by IBIS.

I used to shoot canon and now sony, the IBIS is a huge advantage.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 13, 2012 at 03:00 UTC
In reply to:

IcyVeins: "Sony does not have good lens selection" is code for "Sony doesn't have exotic 600mm telephoto lens or exotic tilt shift lens or 26 thousand versions of a 70-200mm f/2.8 zoom"

If you only compare "Sony" brand lenses to Nikon or Canon, Sony has a lot less lenses. If you also compare Minolta AF(which most Sony shooters would consider "first party") lenses its not that big of a difference, sure most of the Minolta lenses are very old designs, but you can say the same for a large portion Canon/Nikon's lens selection as well.

Tilt/shift, and some rectilinear primes wider than 16mm would probably be the biggest gap in the Sony/Minolta system. The tele end is fine: Minolta 200/2.8, 300/2.8, 300/4, 400/4.5, 500/8 af mirror(no other system has one) 600/4, Sony 300/2.8G, Sony 500/4.0G.

Though buying used telephoto lenses like these may not be everyone's thing, all of the Minolta's are discontinued so if thats the case you're better off with Canon/Nikon.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 25, 2012 at 15:41 UTC
On CES 2012: Lytro Photowalk article (141 comments in total)
In reply to:

HeezDeadJim: For those suggesting that all this camera is, is shooting at a small aperture where everything is in focus, and then blurring it in post-pro...I just tried all the "blurring" techniques in PS5 (smart, gaussian, box, etc.) to replicate some "in focus" christmas lights into fake bokeh ones.

Alas, I could not get it to even remotely look like a melted orb (with the typical haloing) with such tools. Selective blurring is not any way, shape or form, the same as how the lens distorts the shape of out of focus objects. You're talking about edges of objects intersecting into other objects, depending how far/close it is from the focused area and creating our shallow DOF.

If I'm missing a method in PS to mimic this look fairly easy (not 5+ layers and 2 hours later easy), someone please tell me so I can experiment with it some more.

I understand that this camera isn't faking it(I've read the whitepapers etc) but what you're looking for is:

filter-> blur -> lens blur. You can even pick the number of aperture blades(3 to 8) to reproduce a specific type of bokeh

Its fairly processor intensive though, and works best if you have some sort of "depth" map in the alpha channel of your image, though you can simply copy a layer, blur, and mask - it's not nearly as effective then.

If the lytro could capture depth data(not sure) this would actually be a very robust solution.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 15, 2012 at 03:54 UTC
Total: 29, showing: 1 – 20
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