raztec

raztec

Lives in Canada Canada
Joined on Nov 13, 2005
About me:

Traveling and paragliding is what I used to love.
But now it's my boy.

Comments

Total: 173, showing: 1 – 20
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On Behind the Shot: Clouds over Skagsanden article (113 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rod McD: Hi Erez,
Thanks for explaining your technique. I love landscape, but have never been much of PP user, so I greatly appreciate you explaining your thinking here and in your earlier posts.
I like this one, but can't help thinking that I would have retained more of the rock to the left and the peak to the right. Their additional height changes the sense of scale. OTOH, it would then leave open the question of exactly how to crop the foreground - ie, what to include of the foreground sands. Perhaps there's an opportunity to take a second image out of the one panorama?

I've been wondering about that too: How to keep the rock on the left and the peaks on the right while focusing more on the foreground.

I believe by stepping to the left about 1-2 meters and getting down lower, one can allow the foreground to flow up into the peaks on the right.

The rock on the left would become more prominent, being closer, but that would also add greater depth to the photo. Just guessing of course, without being there.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2014 at 17:32 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Clouds over Skagsanden article (113 comments in total)
In reply to:

b craw: One thing that can be agreed upon, I think, is the educational benefit to a comprehensive walk-through - exposures and post processing. Whether one agrees with pivots and decisions in rendering a final image is also a critical dialog helpful to individual artistic development. And, involved here is not only what is changed or altered in editing, but also what might be best left alone from the original exposure(s). There will always be a polarity in preference in terms of the photographic abstraction produced in exposure (be it more or less divergent from observed reality) and the photographic abstraction produced with intensive editing.

Good points. Visual techniques are just one aspect of making us recreate the magic of the scene we photograph. I agree there is so much more to a photograph. Whatever gives us pause to experience the 'awe' of this world is welcome.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2014 at 09:32 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Clouds over Skagsanden article (113 comments in total)
In reply to:

b craw: One thing that can be agreed upon, I think, is the educational benefit to a comprehensive walk-through - exposures and post processing. Whether one agrees with pivots and decisions in rendering a final image is also a critical dialog helpful to individual artistic development. And, involved here is not only what is changed or altered in editing, but also what might be best left alone from the original exposure(s). There will always be a polarity in preference in terms of the photographic abstraction produced in exposure (be it more or less divergent from observed reality) and the photographic abstraction produced with intensive editing.

The reason "cooked" images and HDR is appealing to so many people, is because the photograph can never do justice to the living experience of being there. How many times have you come back from a beautiful place and then looked at the photos and wondered what happened? Where's the magic?

Our eyes' dynamic range is far greater than any camera, and the ability of the iris to change size depending on where in the scene we are looking adds to that.

And the scope of our near 180 degree vision in both width and height adds to the "wow" factor of being in a magnificently beautiful place.

Personally, that's why I don't mind HDR images or somewhat saturated ones, as long as it's not over the top unrealistic.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 22, 2014 at 23:55 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Clouds over Skagsanden article (113 comments in total)

Erez,

First off, thanks for sharing your photo and technique. What you have is a beautiful piece of art. And then exposing yourself to potential criticism from arm chair quarterbacks (myself included) shows great courage.

Regarding the composition, the rock on the left in the final shot is weak and unappealing. In the original version it has shape and form and personality. In my opinion you've cropped too much of it.

And the final image is a tad too blue. The light in the cloud above should have warmed up the scene a bit. As it stands, that cloud captures our gaze, but only briefly because it doesn't infuse the rest of the photo with it's presence.

Finally, I believe that a perfectly balanced photo sometimes doesn't grab our attention the way an asymmetrically balanced photo would.

Again, big cudos to you and your work and your courage and your sharing your technique and thoughts.

Many thanks,
Raz

Direct link | Posted on Nov 22, 2014 at 18:20 UTC as 33rd comment | 1 reply

I have a Nikon D300s and a bunch of glass. Can someone please explain why a Metz flash is any better than a Nikon? Will it work as well as a manufacturers own flash system? If I buy a Metz for my Nikon DSLR will it work with other cameras? Thx

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 15:06 UTC as 30th comment | 2 replies
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review preview (750 comments in total)
In reply to:

Erik Hecht: Here's my first real world experience with the camera in Iceland: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkvoptWnkxQ

Excellent work Erik. That's the best way to shoot video I believe with these cameras. I'm taking note.

Just a small suggestion, I would slow the pace of panning a bit and also add an extra 1/2 - 3/4 second or so to the time spent on each shot.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 18:01 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review preview (750 comments in total)
In reply to:

raztec: This camera is an amazingly ambitious attempt at creating the perfect compact travel anywhere camera. However, I'm not sure it really hit that mark. But I applaud Panasonic for trying.

The reasons are:

1. The m4/3 size sensor doesn't give significantly better IQ than a 1" sensor. While it gives shallower depth of field, which is great, I believe that's offset by the expensive and slightly compromised lens and much larger size. Even the high ISO isn't significantly better than the Sony RX100III.

2. No tilt screen. This is an absolute must if you want use it as a video camera. It's a huge oversight in my opinion. Flash I can live without, but not a tilt screen.

But where it really delivers is in styling, 4K video (and still capture), fast lens, and manual control options. It's obvious that this is a real photographer's camera. But I believe Panasonic could have achieved all that with a 1" sensor, smaller camera and tilt screen.

This should have been two different cameras. And with the GH4 and FZ1000, it would've been easy for Panasonic to do.

1. An LX100 with m43 sensor (uncropped) with a killer 24-70 fast lens. 4k video and tilt screen, built in flash and ND filter. Similar to GH4 in many respects but slightly smaller in size and a fixed lens. For $1200.

2. An LX8 with a 1" sensor with a 24-90 fast lens. 4kvideo, tilt screen, flash and ND filter. Super compact. SonyRXiii killer. $799.

These guys should understand that the competition is not their own product but other manufacturers.

Personally, I would have bought both.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 02:09 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review preview (750 comments in total)

This camera is an amazingly ambitious attempt at creating the perfect compact travel anywhere camera. However, I'm not sure it really hit that mark. But I applaud Panasonic for trying.

The reasons are:

1. The m4/3 size sensor doesn't give significantly better IQ than a 1" sensor. While it gives shallower depth of field, which is great, I believe that's offset by the expensive and slightly compromised lens and much larger size. Even the high ISO isn't significantly better than the Sony RX100III.

2. No tilt screen. This is an absolute must if you want use it as a video camera. It's a huge oversight in my opinion. Flash I can live without, but not a tilt screen.

But where it really delivers is in styling, 4K video (and still capture), fast lens, and manual control options. It's obvious that this is a real photographer's camera. But I believe Panasonic could have achieved all that with a 1" sensor, smaller camera and tilt screen.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 01:04 UTC as 57th comment | 7 replies
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review preview (750 comments in total)
In reply to:

SirLataxe: Very nice - but lacking in two essentials: no articulating screen and no facility to mount a wide angle conversion lens.

An articulated screen would make the camera so much more useful, especially for close-ups, street photography and video, where taking the pictures from waist or lower level makes such a difference.

A high quality add-on WA lens would make the camera an ideal tool for landscapes taken during longer walks in difficult terrain, where the weight of a larger camera and lenses would be tedious.

Articulating screen for video is absolutely critical!
Especially for taking video of children since ideally you want the camera at their level.
Not sure why Panasonic decided to leave that out of an almost perfect camera.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 19, 2014 at 18:56 UTC
On Readers' Showcase: Submit your best portraits! article (38 comments in total)

Do you require model releases or accept photos of children?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 16, 2014 at 16:01 UTC as 25th comment
On Canon PowerShot G7 X First Impressions Review preview (954 comments in total)

The headline should've been: CANON lens DESTROYS SONY sensor!!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 22, 2014 at 16:05 UTC as 34th comment
On Canon PowerShot G7 X First Impressions Review preview (954 comments in total)

It's taken 10+ years for the manufacturers to navigate around all the different iterations of digital cameras to go back to what Olympus knew was the best compromise of size and image quality in 2003 with the C5050/5060/7070 series.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 22, 2014 at 04:55 UTC as 43rd comment
On Canon PowerShot G7 X First Impressions Review preview (954 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dan Wagner: Looks like a nice camera. One thing that's very important to me as a consumer is knowing how long a manufacturer will stock parts for repairs. I have an earlier model G camera that I love, but cannot get repaired.

Parts? Repairs? We are in the throw away age. Add the cost of labour to repair the item and I'd say you're better off looking for a lightly used one if something's broke rather than getting trying to get it fixed.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 22, 2014 at 04:49 UTC
On Ghost Town: Shooting in Kolmanskop article (71 comments in total)
In reply to:

Paul JM: Erez, a couple of comments refer to the 'DR' of the A7, but surely there is some HDR action going on in post here ?

If HDR is done correctly, it's exactly what your eyes see when looking at a scene. Your eyes DR is much higher than a non-HDR photograph, plus the fact that your iris will open and close depending on where in the scene you focus your gaze.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 20, 2014 at 05:06 UTC
On Accessory Review: LaCie Rugged Thunderbolt article (39 comments in total)
In reply to:

steve_hoge: I wish I could recommend LaCie products, but - while I haven't had any catastrophic failures - my experience of their product support is pretty dismal. After a few years of market life on a device not only do the bug fixes cease (even though the same code base is being updated for new products) but the devices themselves are locked down so you can't maintain them yourself.

Agree very much. Will never buy another product from them again after catastrophic failure and zero customer support.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 17, 2014 at 16:45 UTC
In reply to:

raztec: Here's a question that's always plagued me: Why does DPR not adjust the sizes of the studio samples to all be equal? I recognize that the size we see depends on the number of MPx that camera's sensor has, but for a fair comparison they should all be viewed at equal sizes. Surely that's easy enough to do without us having to download the samples and do it ourselves.

You guys have thought of everything. Perfect. Thanks for letting me know about that option.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 16, 2014 at 21:40 UTC

Seems like the LX100 with the Leica lens really delivers!

But that was expected given the amount of experience they've had with the LX series cameras.

Bravo Panasonic and Leica! Your cooperative effort has us consumers happy.

Now, please in the LX100II put a flip screen LCD and have the lens go to 90mm. That would take care of 90% of my photographic needs.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 16, 2014 at 04:17 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies

Here's a question that's always plagued me: Why does DPR not adjust the sizes of the studio samples to all be equal? I recognize that the size we see depends on the number of MPx that camera's sensor has, but for a fair comparison they should all be viewed at equal sizes. Surely that's easy enough to do without us having to download the samples and do it ourselves.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2014 at 04:43 UTC as 58th comment | 5 replies

Just a friendly critique. Photograph #8 is over exposed by 1/2 stop. The two teenage Africans have darker skin than depicted.

Otherwise, stunning photographs.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 13, 2014 at 21:05 UTC as 20th comment
In reply to:

raztec: In the late '80s I cycled across N. Africa, the Middle East and Europe and can attest to the fact that what he says about traveling by bicycle is very true.

However, I can't imagine taking so much gear. The weight, while not as critical as in hiking, is still huge from my experience.

My only question is: would you take this much gear with you if you were to do it again? Wouldn't a simple Nikon FM2 (or equivalent) plus slide film have been sufficient?

In 6 months of bicycle touring I used about 12 rolls of 36 slide film. I had a 25% keeper rate. As Karroly mentioned, each shot was taken with great care and attention to the light and composition. We never took a second shot, or prayed and sprayed just in case we didn't get it right the first time.

Today with digital, I'm sad to say, I take about 5 shots or more of the same subject with bracketing, slightly different composition, or apertures etc.

Honestly, I really miss the days of film when you had a simple manual SLR camera with a huge viewfinder and manual lens with butter smooth focus ring. The experience and sense of engagement with your subjects was completely different.

I'm still waiting for an all manual DSLR that's super low on battery consumption so I can do just this kind of trip. Because of the all obvious advantages of digital it's hard to go back to film. But for a trip like this it's the lightest and most fail proof method.

I just would never carry what Nicolas did

Direct link | Posted on Oct 13, 2014 at 07:46 UTC
Total: 173, showing: 1 – 20
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