raztec

raztec

Lives in Canada Canada
Joined on Nov 13, 2005
About me:

Traveling and paragliding is what I used to love.
But now it's my boy.

Comments

Total: 186, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
In reply to:

ZeneticX: i love tripods with twist lock legs

.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 24, 2015 at 16:53 UTC
In reply to:

ZeneticX: i love tripods with twist lock legs

Actually, I find the twist locks very inconvenient.
They are not nearly as fast as a flip lock.
Not sure what the advantages are and why you like them?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 24, 2015 at 16:49 UTC
On Readers' Showcase: Rodger Kingston article (50 comments in total)
In reply to:

Provia_fan: I would love all the negative commenters to show us their books.

No, because I don't claim they are good enough to be in a book, though some of my friends disagree.

It's not really about guts. It's about whether it's your profession for one, and second if you think they are good enough to publish.

Cudos to Roger for putting himself out there and getting the exposure. But, I just don't see these as worthy of a news item on DPreview considering how many other world class photographers there are here.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 21, 2015 at 03:21 UTC
On Readers' Showcase: Rodger Kingston article (50 comments in total)
In reply to:

Provia_fan: I would love all the negative commenters to show us their books.

Not claiming they are anything special, or worth publishing, but here you go for some samples:
http://bluethermal.zenfolio.com/p361725270

Direct link | Posted on Apr 20, 2015 at 14:44 UTC
On Readers' Showcase: Rodger Kingston article (50 comments in total)

Absolutely nothing against Roger, but seriously guys, other than 4 and 10, the majority of these look like simple snapshots.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 19, 2015 at 14:34 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

raztec: I wonder what the sampling rate of the GPS is?
Needs to be at least 10khz for use in motosports.

I meant 10hz, not 10khz.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 15, 2015 at 17:17 UTC

I wonder what the sampling rate of the GPS is?
Needs to be at least 10khz for use in motosports.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 15, 2015 at 05:42 UTC as 22nd comment | 2 replies

Spoken like a true champ. He knows his priorities.

Now put the most recent 3.0 firmware update into the EM5-II and I'm all in.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 23, 2015 at 17:46 UTC as 49th comment

Here's the crux of their problem, and probably Nikon's too. Very foolish in my opinion:

"So rather than looking at our competitor’s mirrorless cameras and regarding them as a threat, within Canon, our team who’s working on mirrorless should view the DSLR team as a threat. They should view the high-end compact cameras team as a threat. The threats that our mirrorless cameras team face aren’t from other companies, they’re from other divisions within our company."

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 23:11 UTC as 117th comment | 2 replies
On Samsung Galaxy Camera 2 Review preview (87 comments in total)

Why o why o why? Were you guys high?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 14, 2015 at 16:48 UTC as 14th comment
In reply to:

raztec: I find it hard to understand why he takes so many shots of one scene. Is it that necessary? Especially for someone of his caliber? I mean how much difference is there between hundreds shots of the exact same scene and composition?

One of the most frustrating things I find about digital is the amount of photos one has at the end of the day and sorting through them all. And I only shoot a hundred or so shots in one day, not thousands like he claims.

I'd like to see what he says about his method for selecting the "best" shot of several hundred of the exact same scene.

Of course! Should have known. I need to get me one of those!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2014 at 19:15 UTC

I find it hard to understand why he takes so many shots of one scene. Is it that necessary? Especially for someone of his caliber? I mean how much difference is there between hundreds shots of the exact same scene and composition?

One of the most frustrating things I find about digital is the amount of photos one has at the end of the day and sorting through them all. And I only shoot a hundred or so shots in one day, not thousands like he claims.

I'd like to see what he says about his method for selecting the "best" shot of several hundred of the exact same scene.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2014 at 17:27 UTC as 1st comment | 4 replies

I watched this for 15'. Beautiful shots and interesting stories behind the shots. However, I would have preferred a little more information on the camera settings and techniques used to get the shot.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 17:54 UTC as 6th comment | 1 reply
On Behind the Shot: Clouds over Skagsanden article (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rod McD: Hi Erez,
Thanks for explaining your technique. I love landscape, but have never been much of PP user, so I greatly appreciate you explaining your thinking here and in your earlier posts.
I like this one, but can't help thinking that I would have retained more of the rock to the left and the peak to the right. Their additional height changes the sense of scale. OTOH, it would then leave open the question of exactly how to crop the foreground - ie, what to include of the foreground sands. Perhaps there's an opportunity to take a second image out of the one panorama?

I've been wondering about that too: How to keep the rock on the left and the peaks on the right while focusing more on the foreground.

I believe by stepping to the left about 1-2 meters and getting down lower, one can allow the foreground to flow up into the peaks on the right.

The rock on the left would become more prominent, being closer, but that would also add greater depth to the photo. Just guessing of course, without being there.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2014 at 17:32 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Clouds over Skagsanden article (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

b craw: One thing that can be agreed upon, I think, is the educational benefit to a comprehensive walk-through - exposures and post processing. Whether one agrees with pivots and decisions in rendering a final image is also a critical dialog helpful to individual artistic development. And, involved here is not only what is changed or altered in editing, but also what might be best left alone from the original exposure(s). There will always be a polarity in preference in terms of the photographic abstraction produced in exposure (be it more or less divergent from observed reality) and the photographic abstraction produced with intensive editing.

Good points. Visual techniques are just one aspect of making us recreate the magic of the scene we photograph. I agree there is so much more to a photograph. Whatever gives us pause to experience the 'awe' of this world is welcome.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2014 at 09:32 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Clouds over Skagsanden article (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

b craw: One thing that can be agreed upon, I think, is the educational benefit to a comprehensive walk-through - exposures and post processing. Whether one agrees with pivots and decisions in rendering a final image is also a critical dialog helpful to individual artistic development. And, involved here is not only what is changed or altered in editing, but also what might be best left alone from the original exposure(s). There will always be a polarity in preference in terms of the photographic abstraction produced in exposure (be it more or less divergent from observed reality) and the photographic abstraction produced with intensive editing.

The reason "cooked" images and HDR is appealing to so many people, is because the photograph can never do justice to the living experience of being there. How many times have you come back from a beautiful place and then looked at the photos and wondered what happened? Where's the magic?

Our eyes' dynamic range is far greater than any camera, and the ability of the iris to change size depending on where in the scene we are looking adds to that.

And the scope of our near 180 degree vision in both width and height adds to the "wow" factor of being in a magnificently beautiful place.

Personally, that's why I don't mind HDR images or somewhat saturated ones, as long as it's not over the top unrealistic.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 22, 2014 at 23:55 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Clouds over Skagsanden article (117 comments in total)

Erez,

First off, thanks for sharing your photo and technique. What you have is a beautiful piece of art. And then exposing yourself to potential criticism from arm chair quarterbacks (myself included) shows great courage.

Regarding the composition, the rock on the left in the final shot is weak and unappealing. In the original version it has shape and form and personality. In my opinion you've cropped too much of it.

And the final image is a tad too blue. The light in the cloud above should have warmed up the scene a bit. As it stands, that cloud captures our gaze, but only briefly because it doesn't infuse the rest of the photo with it's presence.

Finally, I believe that a perfectly balanced photo sometimes doesn't grab our attention the way an asymmetrically balanced photo would.

Again, big cudos to you and your work and your courage and your sharing your technique and thoughts.

Many thanks,
Raz

Direct link | Posted on Nov 22, 2014 at 18:20 UTC as 37th comment | 1 reply

I have a Nikon D300s and a bunch of glass. Can someone please explain why a Metz flash is any better than a Nikon? Will it work as well as a manufacturers own flash system? If I buy a Metz for my Nikon DSLR will it work with other cameras? Thx

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 15:06 UTC as 31st comment | 2 replies
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review preview (928 comments in total)
In reply to:

Erik Hecht: Here's my first real world experience with the camera in Iceland: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkvoptWnkxQ

Excellent work Erik. That's the best way to shoot video I believe with these cameras. I'm taking note.

Just a small suggestion, I would slow the pace of panning a bit and also add an extra 1/2 - 3/4 second or so to the time spent on each shot.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 18:01 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review preview (928 comments in total)
In reply to:

raztec: This camera is an amazingly ambitious attempt at creating the perfect compact travel anywhere camera. However, I'm not sure it really hit that mark. But I applaud Panasonic for trying.

The reasons are:

1. The m4/3 size sensor doesn't give significantly better IQ than a 1" sensor. While it gives shallower depth of field, which is great, I believe that's offset by the expensive and slightly compromised lens and much larger size. Even the high ISO isn't significantly better than the Sony RX100III.

2. No tilt screen. This is an absolute must if you want use it as a video camera. It's a huge oversight in my opinion. Flash I can live without, but not a tilt screen.

But where it really delivers is in styling, 4K video (and still capture), fast lens, and manual control options. It's obvious that this is a real photographer's camera. But I believe Panasonic could have achieved all that with a 1" sensor, smaller camera and tilt screen.

This should have been two different cameras. And with the GH4 and FZ1000, it would've been easy for Panasonic to do.

1. An LX100 with m43 sensor (uncropped) with a killer 24-70 fast lens. 4k video and tilt screen, built in flash and ND filter. Similar to GH4 in many respects but slightly smaller in size and a fixed lens. For $1200.

2. An LX8 with a 1" sensor with a 24-90 fast lens. 4kvideo, tilt screen, flash and ND filter. Super compact. SonyRXiii killer. $799.

These guys should understand that the competition is not their own product but other manufacturers.

Personally, I would have bought both.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 02:09 UTC
Total: 186, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »