Biowizard

Biowizard

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Oct 21, 2011

Comments

Total: 242, showing: 121 – 140
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Lovely video - though I was briefly worried for one tree that appeared to be in the way!

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Oct 18, 2012 at 17:04 UTC as 5th comment

What on earth has happened to the concept of "HD"? This acronym defines the NUMBER of pixels on a display, NOT their SIZE! The Note 10.1 and Nexus 7 have EXACTLY the same number of pixels, and yet you describe one as not HD, and the other, as HD.

Full HD (1080i and 1080p) means 1920*1080 pixels, with a lesser HD (720p) being specified as 1280*720. Clearly both tablets come under the latter category.

And to argue that a smaller screen makes it "look" like higher/more definition, would throw a massive spanner into the works if you tried reviewing fifty-inch plasma or LCD HD TVs! What would you call them? "Ultra-Low-Definition" because they are even bigger than the Note 10.1?

Common guys, this is a tech review site: learn to use your tech terms correctly!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2012 at 10:00 UTC as 62nd comment
On A sneak peek at our forthcoming camera test scene article (323 comments in total)

Lose the dodgy colour photos (we have no way of assessing how "good" they are to start with), add some of the old scene so we can compare new cameras to old, and put in some depth for DOF/Bokeh comparison.

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Oct 12, 2012 at 22:35 UTC as 13th comment
On A sneak peek at our forthcoming camera test scene article (323 comments in total)
In reply to:

tkbslc: Dpreview has a real problem. They keep making the site better, but a big group of whiners are driving the regular users away by making the site less friendly. That leaves a higher concentration of sour-pusses on here which only exacerbates the problem. Pretty soon it is just going to be a handful of people who share their time between telling kids to stay off their lawn, and complaining about anything dpreview does.

Another person unable to comprehend reasoned constructive criticism. You want spoon feeding? Get yourself a spoon, and feed.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 12, 2012 at 22:33 UTC
On A sneak peek at our forthcoming camera test scene article (323 comments in total)
In reply to:

simon65: I'm slightly puzzled at the use of another cameras photographs in a test scene.

If the test shot isn't sharp, how will readers know if that's due to a fault in the camera/lens being tested or is inherent to the photograph in the scene?

Surely its better to stick with items that everyones knows have an intrinsic and unvarying (over time) colour and sharpness?

I've already made that very point - why include photographs of uknown quality in a test shot? They could all have been made on blunt pinhole cameras for all we know, and mis-processed with the wrong chemistry. Apart from "standard" (ie commecial) colour charts, the ONLY thing worth including is real objects.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 12, 2012 at 22:32 UTC
On A sneak peek at our forthcoming camera test scene article (323 comments in total)
In reply to:

oohaah: no, the globe is gone :(

I'd blame iOS 6 and Apple Maps for that! LOL!!

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Oct 11, 2012 at 15:23 UTC
On A sneak peek at our forthcoming camera test scene article (323 comments in total)

From the old scene, I miss:

1) Paperclips and Baileys bottle: metal/metallic respectively, with specular reflections.

2) Martini bottle & Batteries (Peripheral), Queen of Hearts (central): all ideal for checking over-sharpening, edge chromatic aberration, JPEG artifacts, noise, and the like.

3) Kodak Q-60 colour chart - large gamut and wide ranging palette.

4) The dark box of Yarn reels - which were great for checking shadow detail.

In the new scene I dislike:

a) Too many colour photos of unknown quality/calibration/gamut

b) The non-standard playing cards: you should stick to a known standard (eg, Piatnik, Bicycle, etc) like your previous Queen of Hearts.

c) Dull "flat" feel (which I realise is actually unimportant, but hey ho!

In the new scene, I LIKE:

x) The computer PCB, wine corks, and other real items/textures around the periphery

y) The hatched engravings - assuming they are genuine originals

IN SHORT: you are MISSING some vital textures/reflections/shadows.

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Oct 10, 2012 at 23:06 UTC as 57th comment

Shoot ... you mean it DOESN'T connect to FaceBook or make phone calls? Sheesh ...

Brian ( :-) )

Direct link | Posted on Oct 9, 2012 at 21:02 UTC as 11th comment

Google transmogrify language good explains, so kind knowing differs in specification. Upkeep with good works, thanking.

8-)

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Oct 4, 2012 at 14:50 UTC as 6th comment

Annoyingly, I got a brand new iPhone 4S just last week - and still have my previous iPhone 4, unlocked. And I've already bought a case. Had I seen this first, I would almost certainly have gone for it. Actually, I might anyway!

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Sep 28, 2012 at 16:12 UTC as 2nd comment

Wouldn't it be great if this brilliant Korean company came out with a pro-grade, retro-styled full-frame DSLR body to go with this increasingly delicious library of lenses! Something vaguely modelled on a Canon F1 or Nikon F6, only digital of course, maybe even with interchangeable (100% coverage) focusing screens and/or prism housings. Advanced photography has lost a lot since the passing of these brilliant, true system cameras.

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Sep 16, 2012 at 17:33 UTC as 4th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Biowizard: I just love the way Samyang concentrates on large aperture, manual focus prime lenses. If I had a compatible camera, I'd be buying these. I'm getting increasingly fed up with autofocus, and trying to convince my DSLR to focus on the part of the picture that I want to see sharp.

Long may Samyang resist the temptation to put its glass in plastic tubes with ultrasonic motors, image stablisers and all that other claptrap which is typical of most camera lenses these days.

Brian

Here's the funny thing, my children ... for the first 30 years or so of my photographic life, I not only focused by hand, but used a weird recording medium called "film" which BOTH cost many pennies every time I pressed the shutter button, AND refused to let me review my shot until a week or two later.

Mysteriously, most of my best photos originate from this strange medium. Picking up a $3000 DSLR+Lens combo and squeezing off a few hundred shots in the hope one might work, is not clever. It is not helpful. And it is NOT ART.

7 years of autofocus, autoexposure, autowhitebalance has left me yearning a time when sunsets were golden, indoor scenes were warm, and if you needed to, you changed this with pieces of coloured glass in front of the lens.

My next camera might be a Nikon D4 for all I know. But it will be attached to manual-focus Zeiss glass, and with a fixed daylight colour balance. I want to start enjoying PHOTOGRAPHY, rather than "shooting pictures", once more.

There!

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Sep 14, 2012 at 23:54 UTC

I just love the way Samyang concentrates on large aperture, manual focus prime lenses. If I had a compatible camera, I'd be buying these. I'm getting increasingly fed up with autofocus, and trying to convince my DSLR to focus on the part of the picture that I want to see sharp.

Long may Samyang resist the temptation to put its glass in plastic tubes with ultrasonic motors, image stablisers and all that other claptrap which is typical of most camera lenses these days.

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Sep 14, 2012 at 14:32 UTC as 31st comment | 9 replies
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1 Hands-on Preview preview (626 comments in total)
In reply to:

Biowizard: Yes, this sounds snobbish, but at nearly $3K, so what?! ...

1) Would that the marque read "Olympus", "Canon", "Nikon" (or even "Leica"), rather than that of the company that makes cheap music players and consumer goods.

2) A high end product should not be festooned with engraved-in proclamations, such as "35mm FULL FRAME CMOS IMAGE SENSOR", complete with its own orange/metallic ring round the lens throat. That would be like writing, "6.395 litre v12 24-valve twin turbo" on a great stripe down the side of a Rolls-Royce or Bentley. Pur-lease!

3) "Cyber-shot" makes me think back to my Mavica, that revolutionary early digicam with 3.5" floppies as its media. Brilliant before USB, still have two of them - but oh, the image quality. A good dose of Gaussian Blur and halving of size of images was necessary before you could even look at them without wincing.

In short, I LOVE the idea of a fixed-lens full-frame compact. But not one that includes the dumbed-down slogans of cheap gear.

Brian

PS - I would also like a fixed, full-time mechanical focus ring and a proper optical viewfinder with coupled range-finder. Gosh, so I need a Leica and some SuperGlue (to make my choice of 35mm lens "fixed") after all!

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2012 at 18:07 UTC
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1 Hands-on Preview preview (626 comments in total)

Yes, this sounds snobbish, but at nearly $3K, so what?! ...

1) Would that the marque read "Olympus", "Canon", "Nikon" (or even "Leica"), rather than that of the company that makes cheap music players and consumer goods.

2) A high end product should not be festooned with engraved-in proclamations, such as "35mm FULL FRAME CMOS IMAGE SENSOR", complete with its own orange/metallic ring round the lens throat. That would be like writing, "6.395 litre v12 24-valve twin turbo" on a great stripe down the side of a Rolls-Royce or Bentley. Pur-lease!

3) "Cyber-shot" makes me think back to my Mavica, that revolutionary early digicam with 3.5" floppies as its media. Brilliant before USB, still have two of them - but oh, the image quality. A good dose of Gaussian Blur and halving of size of images was necessary before you could even look at them without wincing.

In short, I LOVE the idea of a fixed-lens full-frame compact. But not one that includes the dumbed-down slogans of cheap gear.

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2012 at 18:04 UTC as 142nd comment | 2 replies

What a gorgeous looking piece of glass. Exactly all I need for day-to-day shooting with a D4. Yes, I'd need to win the lottery first, but wow how I'd love this to shoot through!

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Aug 30, 2012 at 23:08 UTC as 10th comment
On Nikon Coolpix S800c Android camera first look article (103 comments in total)

A camera driven by a general purpose operating system is a fantastic combination. So is a camera that can directly connect to Facebook, 500px, or whatever, even if it is not a general purpose computer or pda.

Purely for personal reasons, my two issues with this particular one is: (a) I prefer iOS to Android, and (b) I prefer DSLRs to compacts.

Now if Apple got into bed with Nikon, and developed a version of the D800 with iOS, and special support for wireless "tethered" shooting using iPad as the live view preview screen and control surface, THEN I would be seriously excited.

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2012 at 09:50 UTC as 35th comment

For entirely emotional reasons (I've used Olympus cameras since my original, then brand new, OM-1n, which I still have and which still works perfectly, through my E-1, which delivers 5 million lovely pixels per shot) - I *REALLY* hope there is an E-7 sometime ...

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Aug 17, 2012 at 22:32 UTC as 47th comment
In reply to:

Biowizard: To those who are moaning that, for the US, $2.5bn is too much to send this incredible machine to Mars, I reply that this mission's costs pale compared to the $15bn that the UK has just spent to let people run around in circles for 2 weeks on a track. That's right: brilliant rocket science at 6 times less than the cost of a sports day.

This Mars mission is incredible, and of course they will be using older, proven, radiation-hardened tech rather than the latest-gee-whiz cameras that won't even work on Planet Earth for another 12 months, while Nikon corrects the firmware or Canon invents a better glue for its mirrors.

Stop whingeing, engage your brains, and open your minds to the incredible achievement that NASA's latest rover represents.

And consider: most of the electronics and hi-tech materials that make your latest gee-whiz toys work the way they do, WOULD NOT EVEN EXIST were it not for previous NASA missions.

Jeez, some of you guys just don't get it, do you?

Brian

Boky, more than a few of the nations competing in the Olympics ARE currently at war - and there's no ceasefire, even for these couple of weeks. Boys and girls running/jumping/throwing/swimming/etc fixes NOTHING. The Men With Guns And Bombs will continue their attrocities, no matter who can ride a BMX fastest in East London. Yeah, SAD. But TRUE. :-(

Direct link | Posted on Aug 8, 2012 at 23:00 UTC

To those who are moaning that, for the US, $2.5bn is too much to send this incredible machine to Mars, I reply that this mission's costs pale compared to the $15bn that the UK has just spent to let people run around in circles for 2 weeks on a track. That's right: brilliant rocket science at 6 times less than the cost of a sports day.

This Mars mission is incredible, and of course they will be using older, proven, radiation-hardened tech rather than the latest-gee-whiz cameras that won't even work on Planet Earth for another 12 months, while Nikon corrects the firmware or Canon invents a better glue for its mirrors.

Stop whingeing, engage your brains, and open your minds to the incredible achievement that NASA's latest rover represents.

And consider: most of the electronics and hi-tech materials that make your latest gee-whiz toys work the way they do, WOULD NOT EVEN EXIST were it not for previous NASA missions.

Jeez, some of you guys just don't get it, do you?

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Aug 8, 2012 at 18:37 UTC as 25th comment | 4 replies
Total: 242, showing: 121 – 140
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