Biowizard

Biowizard

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Oct 21, 2011

Comments

Total: 232, showing: 81 – 100
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On Olympus executives sentenced, avoid jail time article (50 comments in total)
In reply to:

designdef: I think it's worth pointing out, Olympus's main product line is in Endoscopy. Cameras are a small, but important part of their business. I've almost been tempted to purchase two or three of their excellent cameras and certainly have been shafted by one or more of their endoscopes;)

Bend over BlackAdder ... it's *** time!!!

[for our US cousins, this is a reference to a cult GB comedy that didn't involve Benny Hill] ;-)

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Jul 7, 2013 at 18:20 UTC
On Olympus executives sentenced, avoid jail time article (50 comments in total)

And so it goes on ... but what **I** want to know, is where is my E-7 ???

Still using a much-loved, 5 Mpixel CCD based Olympus E-1, one of the best DSLRS from (errrr) about 10 years ago. And wanting to leverage my investment in glass, accessories and more.

Brian

Direct link | Posted on Jul 7, 2013 at 18:18 UTC as 13th comment | 2 replies

Serious Kudos to Dave Ackerman! Brilliant project, amazing results, fascinating blog article. Made my day! :-)

Brian

Direct link | Posted on May 29, 2013 at 14:59 UTC as 7th comment
On Introducing... What The Duck on dpreview.com article (62 comments in total)

Well Duck Me - one less thing to look forward to in my weekly copy of AP!

Definition: "Hyperbole" (/hīˈpərbəlē/) [n] ... one of the best satirical comic strips in the world

Direct link | Posted on May 17, 2013 at 23:40 UTC as 54th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

arhmatic: Thanks for the entertainment, Adobe and dpreview...

I am here solely for the comments.

Nah, you can't see the slow motion unless you subscribe to Adobe Premiere CC ...

Direct link | Posted on May 10, 2013 at 16:58 UTC
In reply to:

Tom DeMita: Adobes' stock went down 3 points in 3 days. What happened 3 days ago?

Yeah, looks fun if you view the past week ... but look back a month, and they are still higher than they were 4 weeks ago; 12 weeks ago; more.

Direct link | Posted on May 10, 2013 at 16:46 UTC
In reply to:

Biowizard: I haven't paid any money to Kodak for several years. They sent a bailiff round to take all my 35mm transparencies away so I can never see them again. And now that Kodak has gone bust, I can't even get my slides back by paying.

Twilight Zone? Or simply the New Reality. Thanks, Adobe, NOT.

dinoSnake, sure you can save your FINISHED work in TIF, PNG - or even the ancient PCX format. But these files will not contain all your separate layers, adjustments, vector text, and so on, ready to edit further. It's the same with InDesign: you can save to PDF (which you can then render to TIF, PNG, PCX if you want in Photoshop), but you'll lose your editable, adjustable file.

It's the fact that loss of access to CC would mean loss of access to YOUR SOURCE DOCUMENTS, Your IPR, that sticks in the craw. Of course your derivative works will be perfectly printable and viewable forever more.

Direct link | Posted on May 10, 2013 at 16:36 UTC

I haven't paid any money to Kodak for several years. They sent a bailiff round to take all my 35mm transparencies away so I can never see them again. And now that Kodak has gone bust, I can't even get my slides back by paying.

Twilight Zone? Or simply the New Reality. Thanks, Adobe, NOT.

Direct link | Posted on May 10, 2013 at 15:17 UTC as 230th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Kinematic Digit: I wonder how many people would complain if you could use a new Nikon D800E, Nikon D4, Canon 1Dx or a Canon 5Dmk3 for $19 a month and then after a year decided to return it?

You CAN hire a camera if you want to. Or buy it on finance. Just as you can cars. Or golf clubs.

But once you have paid in full for your camera, it's yours to keep. You can trade in for a new model if you want, or just stick with the old one you know. And if you then lose your job or run out of money for some other reason, it won't suddenly stop working. Or be taken away. And neither will you be denied access to any of the photos you might have taken with it.

So yours is a poor analogy. This Adobe thing is altogether more insidious than you make out.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2013 at 15:52 UTC
In reply to:

John Haugaard: So, how many of the cry babies here have paid $3 for a cup of coffee recently. That was really worth it. So, Photoshop is a tool that can facilitate your career, or let you practice your craft. Make a decision as to whether it is worth it. If not, then move on. Use the GIMP, or some splendid Corel product, or whatever. Make a decision. Move on.

I never pay stupid money like that for coffee - Starbucks is a rip-off too. But even if I was crazy enough to shell out several bucks for a frappuccino with strawberry and foie gras foam, or whatever, and could bring myself to drink the muck, NOT buying another cup would NOT lock me out of MY CREATIVE WORK.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2013 at 14:33 UTC
In reply to:

Harry Shepherd: Charles Boot posted "Here is a proposal, which these greedy people would never think of: Let everyone upgrade to CS 6 if they want to at a reasonable price (free for users of CS5.5) and keep ACR updated for CS 6 for say 10 years. Something like this would have earned stars. as it is they are hated."

That would be nice, but it would appear you cannot even buy the CS6 upgrade at the full price anymore.

Looking on the bright side this will save me money. Bye adobe.

harry

CS6 is still available on DVD from some resellers - I just bought my last-opportunity copy 2 days ago, and it arrived within the past hour - not bad for a UK purchase of a disk that was in a California warehouse! At least FedEx is a large company that prides itself on customer service!

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2013 at 13:46 UTC
In reply to:

epo001: All this endless whining. Adobe don't want to sell me any upgrades? Fine, I'll continue to use CS3 until the competition improves. If you have CS it will continue to work, what's the problem?

Most non-commerical users don't NEED Photoshop, it is just a name they've heard or they are fetishising the most polished toy, rather like people who buy a sports car and just use it to drive to the shops.

Yeah, existing installations of CSx (or even, as in my case, Photoshop 7) will work on ... UNTIL, of course, you need RAW support for your new camera ... or Windows 9 drops support for the 32-bit version you have been relying on ... or ...

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2013 at 10:43 UTC

Who would rent a house, if they could afford to buy one? Even though it is a massive investment, most people would prefer to live in their own place, rather than at the beck and call of a landlord.

Who would live with a hired care forever, if they could afford to buy one of their own? Again, though it's a major expense, most people are willing to sacrifice other things to pay for it.

Now if a RENTED house cost more than one you owned, or a HIRED car cost more than buying and running your own - NO-ONE would rent a house, or hire a car. We'd ALL buy and be done with it.

And yet here were are, where Adobe now wants EVERYONE to become RENTERS ... but for MORE that it used to cost to become OWNERS.

Pigs in the trough don't get close to describing their cynical greed.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2013 at 10:21 UTC as 536th comment

The poll has missed my MAIN worry: potentially losing access to all MY artwork and creative IP, simply because one day either Adobe goes bust and my software times out, or I cannot afford my subscription any more.

It would be OK if the software could still open/edit/print images PREVIOUSLY worked on, even if you stopped paying for the subs. But that isn't how it works.

Brian

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2013 at 22:31 UTC as 754th comment | 7 replies
On Photoshop CC: Adobe responds to reaction article (1853 comments in total)
In reply to:

HubertChen: A true story: Decades ago the leading E-CAD vendor introduced a hardware dongle as copy protection. It plugged into the printer port and thus you could not print anymore. Real bummer on a CAD workstation. ( This was before printing over network ). Our CAD department was very upset, because the only way to print was to obtain a cracked SW. We never used such thing before. So in the first year we paid for the SW with dongle, but used the cracked version. However, in the subsequent years of new versions, the cracked version remained but new licenses were no longer purchased. The inhibition barrier of using a cracked version was broken. I truly wonder if this new move from Adobe will decrease or increase illegal copy installations ?

Nothing to do with Intergraph, I suppose? Still have one of their dongles somewhere, never even did install the stuff.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2013 at 14:15 UTC
On Photoshop CC: Adobe responds to reaction article (1853 comments in total)

QUOTE: "The reason behind the subscription-only move is the logistics of supporting two sets of software. The last 12 months of development was brutal. And there were results we were not happy with. We have decided to focus on the CC products."

Er, HELLO? Just HOW hard is it to REMOVE the "phone-home-and-disable-me" code to convert CC back into a stand-along CS version?

I never thought I would be encountering so much SNAKE OIL at one time!

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2013 at 08:42 UTC as 562nd comment | 1 reply
On Photoshop CC: Adobe responds to reaction article (1853 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michiel Koolen: The Adobe Financial people have gone over this. They will lose revenue from people who would upgrade only every few years. They already accepted that 2 years ago, by only allowing upgrades from the previous version.

People who will pirate the software will keep on doing that. It will be the never ending cat-and-mouse game between hackers and DRM. Adobe has a perfect track record of losing that one. I'm sure they know that.

So what will they lose financially? A few thousand enthusiasts who would spend a few hundred dollars every 2-4 years.

What will they gain? No more need to push out updates every 12-18 months. They can add 1-2 features and boast about it. Predictable and constant revenue, for products that have reached such a maturity level it makes it difficult to come up with something new and generate revenue in a traditional business model.

The Creative Cloud is very innovative indeed. As a business model. The real innovation will now have to come from the competition.

Yeah, rattymouse, you MISREAD Michiel's eloquent post - which is NOT pro-Adobe in any way!

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2013 at 08:40 UTC
In reply to:

CarlosNunezUSA: Corel is going to be laughing all the way to the bank with this mess by Adobe.

The cloud is the mother of all lock-ins, some things are good for the cloud, but NOT everything is a good business to be on the cloud.

When the greedy CEO of Adobe wakes up, a lot of market will be lost. If I had shares of Adobe, I would be dumping them right about now because that decision is going to cost them dearly.

Just like Microsoft and Windows 8, all the customers yelling at them "NO" and they went ahead with it. Results? Sales are flat...

The REALLY insiduous thing about Win8, is that many brand new machines will ONLY run Win8 - their BIOS prevents booting from and/or installing earlier versions of Windows - or Linux. I know, I have an HP ElitePad 900, which is a lovely tablet - but TOTALLY LOCKED to Windows 8.

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2013 at 22:33 UTC

I am old enough to have starting my computing career using time-sharing terminals on a mainframe computer. Then the PC was invented, and for 30 happy years, we've been freed from the tyranny of the "SysOps" in the central computing department.

Guess what: the Cloud is simply a reinventing of the old method of computing; the deathknell to "personal" computing; a reversion to 1979 and all that.

Bravo Adobe for backtracking 35 years.

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2013 at 10:24 UTC as 344th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Biowizard: It's taken a number of years, but this is the obvious and inevitable follow-on from the "Authorisation/Activation" model that Adobe first introduced with the original CS (that followed on after Photoshop 7, Illustrator 10 & InDesign 2). Up till then, you could buy your CD, and install it on a computer without even having to register it. You had a personal serial number, and "agreed" not to make multiple installations or to give the software away. And if you did the latter, the serial number could be traced to you.

With CS, once you'd installed your software, you had to go online to get your stuff "activated" - without this it wouldn't work. At the time, many of us felt this could one day be abused, and this is one of several reasons I stuck with PS 7.

Looks like we sceptics were right all along. It's just taken Adobe a few years longer than we originally thought.

This is BAD, Adobe. VERY BAD.

BaldCol, I am not against activation PER SE ... as a software writer myself, I am all too aware of the need to control piracy. But I have never liked the idea of "what if ACME.COM (or whoever) goes bust and/or turns bad?". The idea of MY creative work being locked away from ME because some software company decides to remove my license, for whatever reason, is plain BAD.

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2013 at 08:39 UTC
Total: 232, showing: 81 – 100
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