Joseph S Wisniewski

Lives in United States Detroit, MI, United States
Works as a Speech and sensor scientist
Has a website at http://www.swissarmyfork.com
Joined on Jul 12, 2002
About me:

I've been in love with photography for over 40 years.

My favorite form of photography is macro, and much of my gear is of my own design.

I've done professional photography on and off for over 20 years.
Taught 8 years at Midwest Photography Workshops.
Designed 3 scientific digital cameras and 6 lenses.

Author of mImage and (coming soon to the App Store and Google Play) ColorForEveryone.

Comments

Total: 648, showing: 61 – 80
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On article Apple buys camera-technology company LinX (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: Does LinX make sensors?

Nope.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2015 at 01:08 UTC
On article Apple buys camera-technology company LinX (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

WaltFrench: Think of the Very Large Array of multiple radio telescopes that are now state-of-the-art. Separate sensors covering a wider radius, so able—with some not-actually-horrible computations—to get the equivalent of a big sensor/lens w/o the depth that others here aptly note.

Combining the separate images is a bit trickier than for radio telescopes due to the much more challenging depth of field issues. Note that clever as Lytros was, the images never had the fine resolution that people increasingly expect from even snapshot cameras.

Radiotelescope arrays operate by correlated sampling throughout the array: phase is important in synthetic aperture imaging.

You'd need to build the camera array out of Kinect 2 style gated sensors to pull that off in an array camera. Optical telescope arrays like ROTSE don't correlate phase, they orient the scopes to different headings to simultaneously capture wider areas.

> Note that clever as Lytros was,

Lytro wasn't actually "clever". Array cameras are more clever, but they suffer from the same problem Lytro did, dramatic undersampling.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2015 at 01:06 UTC
On article Apple buys camera-technology company LinX (74 comments in total)

Trying to figure how this is any different from Pelican Imaging and their 2x2 and 4x4 array cameras.

Linx and Pelican both have too low "fill factors", most of their array is the space between the microcameras: wasting pretty much all the potential of the idea. They are also "comb filtered", which makes image recombination incredibly difficult. They definitely can't fulfill the claims of matching the performance of a single lens the size of their arrays.

My prediction: this is going to be as unnewsworthy as Apple's PrimeSense purchase.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2015 at 01:00 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply

After the Triggertrap Ada kickstarter debacle, I don't have much interest in minor program updates from these guys.

How much development is going on at Triggertrap these days? How many people are left?

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2015 at 20:59 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

SigmaChrome: 80MP, Medium Format ... Really? A Sigma DP1M, 2M or 3M can do very close the the same job for a tiny fraction of the cost.

And why "pounds - lbs"? You are writing for an international audience, Brittany. Most of the world now uses Grams and Kilograms. Pounds and ounces are pretty much passé.

@RichRMA, One of the most color accurate cameras ever built used two Foveon sensors. I know, I designed it.

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 02:45 UTC
In reply to:

grasscatcher: At first, I thought this was another April Fool's joke, but then saw the byline was dates March 31st, not April. Tradition holds that when an April 1st joke is not created on April 1st, then the creator is the fool. However, the use of compact flash makes me still wonder if it is a joke, thought CF was on its way out? The CCD, I can believe that.

Phase One is in a timezone 9 hours ahead of dpReview.

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 02:41 UTC
On article Sony Alpha a7 II Review (850 comments in total)
In reply to:

NJOceanView: Excellent and helpful review. I'm surprised at the high ISO noise because Nikon images which are lavishly praised by DP Review not just for their clean high ISO capabilities but also for their ability to push up shadows without adding significant noise vis-a-vis their Canon counterparts also use Sony sensors. Surely Sony wouldn't use an inferior sensor in their own cameras than those they supply Nikon. Can someone help me understand this disparity? Is it because this is a mirrorless camera, or something else? Thanks!

It's because Sony Semiconductor and Sony Camera are highly independent, and Sony Semi doesn't want to risk losing customers like Nikon to competitors such as CMOSIS. So Sony Cameras is treated as a second class citizen, behind Nikon, Pentax, etc.

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2015 at 23:53 UTC
In reply to:

Jozef M: How much weight? How big/small is this apparatus? Use the metric system too, please.

@spaggom, "British law now defines" nothing that matters, in the slightest, to the motion picture industry (although India is a different story).

Hollywood still rules, and they use "imperial" units.

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2015 at 04:41 UTC
On article CP+ 2015: Canon shows off prototype 120MP CMOS sensor (255 comments in total)

Surprised nobody mentioned copy machines or scanners. That sensor can grab a B size at 780 DPI, or serve a common A sized/A1 scanner at 1200 DPI.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 16:56 UTC as 37th comment
On article CP+ 2015: Canon shows off prototype 120MP CMOS sensor (255 comments in total)
In reply to:

nathantw: If they made a 6 cm x 6 cm sensor and offer it to medium format companies I'd jump for joy!

Until you saw the price.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 16:52 UTC
On article Go wide! Hands-on with Canon's 11-24mm F4 L (229 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tizzio: Huh...what about the front element of my 600/4 EF

"According to Canon, the 11-24mm's front element is the largest ever manufactured for an SLR lens, at 87mm in diameter."

Canon says that the front element is the largest "round front" ground glass aspheric made for an SLR. The emphasis on "round front" is necessary because several camera companies have made mirror lenses for SLRs, and mirror lenses of the common Schmidt design use aspheric corrector plates as the first lens element.

I think that the second element is much more interesting. Canon says it's the largest molded glass aspheric, and look at the shape in the diagrams. It's a thing of beauty.

I don't know if dpReview lost a few words, or if they got a different version of the Canon press release than I'm looking at now.

Link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 00:54 UTC
On article Go wide! Hands-on with Canon's 11-24mm F4 L (229 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joseph S Wisniewski: I think there's a word or three missing from "According to Canon, the 11-24mm's front element is the largest ever manufactured for an SLR lens, at 87mm in diameter."

Maybe "for a rectilinear ultrawide SLR lens" or "for an aspherical SLR lens" (if that monster is one of the aspherical elements in the 11-24.

Indeed. Canon says that the front element is the largest "round front" ground glass aspheric made for an SLR. The emphasis on "round front" is necessary because several camera companies have made mirror lenses for SLRs, and mirror lenses of the common Schmidt design use aspheric corrector plates as the first lens element.

I think that the second element is much more interesting. Canon says it's the largest molded glass aspheric, and look at the shape in the diagrams. It's a thing of beauty.

Link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 00:46 UTC

Que es tu K-S2!

Si!

Link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 00:41 UTC as 59th comment
On article Go wide! Hands-on with Canon's 11-24mm F4 L (229 comments in total)

Oh, and "Kodak makes some excellent Wratten filters"?

Didn't they sell that business to Tiffen years ago?

Link | Posted on Feb 7, 2015 at 20:57 UTC as 25th comment
On article Go wide! Hands-on with Canon's 11-24mm F4 L (229 comments in total)

I think there's a word or three missing from "According to Canon, the 11-24mm's front element is the largest ever manufactured for an SLR lens, at 87mm in diameter."

Maybe "for a rectilinear ultrawide SLR lens" or "for an aspherical SLR lens" (if that monster is one of the aspherical elements in the 11-24.

Link | Posted on Feb 7, 2015 at 20:57 UTC as 26th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Jellytime: I cannot wait to get hands on the new macro. I hope it won't be too expensive.

Shouldn't be too bad. It's not wearing the Zeiss label.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2015 at 20:34 UTC
In reply to:

TN Args: @Smartypants...... humunnnnnnnngous!

I would still like to see a Sony statement on who they think is going to buy the A7 system and who they think will be buying the A77/99 system. With their separate lens systems.

I'm pretty sure that Sony's view of who will buy the SLT cameras boils down to "too few to bother with". Ignoring A77 II as a minor refresh, the last new SLT was A99, a bit over 2 years ago.

In that same time, they've brought out 7 mirrorless alphas, including the 7 body in 3 different resolutions.

I pointed out that SLT was a "stopgap" 4 years ago. The surprise isn't that it's going away, it's that the Rube Goldberg hung on as long as it did.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/36404983

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2015 at 20:31 UTC
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