Joseph S Wisniewski

Joseph S Wisniewski

Lives in United States Detroit, MI, United States
Works as a Speech and sensor scientist
Has a website at http://www.swissarmyfork.com
Joined on Jul 12, 2002
About me:

I've been in love with photography for over 40 years.

My favorite form of photography is macro, and much of my gear is of my own design.

I've done professional photography on and off for over 20 years.
Taught 8 years at Midwest Photography Workshops.
Designed 3 scientific digital cameras and 6 lenses.

Author of mImage and (coming soon to the App Store and Google Play) ColorForEveryone.

Comments

Total: 508, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Edac2: Why can't a 60 x 60mm sensor be made? 43.8 x 32.9mm is nowhere near "full frame" and there will be a significant loss of focal length using this back (43.8 is 73% of 60, and 32.9 is only 55% of 60). Perhaps having the sensor plane further from the lens than a film plane compensates for this; then you would just lose some of the square image at the top and bottom of the frame. There would be other compromises, though, such as not being able to use the camera's viewfinder. Would one keep the mirror flipped up to use this back?

To answer some serious misconceptions,

> To answer the original - the size is reduced because the circle of the lenses, at least the wides, would not produce acceptable corners on a sensor the same size as the film.

And yet, those lenses did produce acceptable corners on extreme high resolution film like Tech Pan.

> The same reason full frame wide lenses had to be redesigned,

Tell that to Leica, whose existing FF lenses, despite the short back focus, are among the sharpest in the world.

> and Oly opted for a new 4:3 lens system,

Which ended up discontinued when the world noticed that Oly's "telecentric" talk was a pack of lies.

> and Nikon went with DX for their initial pro cameras.

Because, at the time, FF sensors cost over $10,000.

> Sensors see corners (extreme angles) differently to film, and the corners would be lousy.

And simple offset microlenses fix that.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 29, 2014 at 02:57 UTC
In reply to:

Dan Nikon: I have a full Hassy V system that includes 9 lenses, 10 backs, 2 x 501CM's and a 500ELX, I use it for fine art in doing darkroom prints, stellar system for peanuts in terms of what it used to cost. That being said, as tempting as this 50 MP back is and I don't find the price too outrageous, I would rather have a 20MP 56mm x 56mm ( that is the full image area ) back that I can impart the same look and feel of the format with, not a cropped version that only slightly outdoes my new D810. Sure, high res is great but I would rather sacrifice MP count for great low light and having it be 6x6.

I never crop my 6x6 images, I shoot to fill a square frame. Hopefully they will sell enough of these to create the basis for R&D to make a proper 6x6 back one day...one can only dream at this point.

> I would rather have a 20MP 56mm x 56mm

Sorry. Megaoixels have almost nothing to do with cost. 2, 20, or 200mp, that 56x56mm back is going to cost over $60k.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 29, 2014 at 02:46 UTC
In reply to:

Dan Nikon: I have a full Hassy V system that includes 9 lenses, 10 backs, 2 x 501CM's and a 500ELX, I use it for fine art in doing darkroom prints, stellar system for peanuts in terms of what it used to cost. That being said, as tempting as this 50 MP back is and I don't find the price too outrageous, I would rather have a 20MP 56mm x 56mm ( that is the full image area ) back that I can impart the same look and feel of the format with, not a cropped version that only slightly outdoes my new D810. Sure, high res is great but I would rather sacrifice MP count for great low light and having it be 6x6.

I never crop my 6x6 images, I shoot to fill a square frame. Hopefully they will sell enough of these to create the basis for R&D to make a proper 6x6 back one day...one can only dream at this point.

Or maybe RED only ships about 20% of what they announce.

Just sayin'

Direct link | Posted on Jul 29, 2014 at 02:44 UTC
In reply to:

Edac2: Why can't a 60 x 60mm sensor be made? 43.8 x 32.9mm is nowhere near "full frame" and there will be a significant loss of focal length using this back (43.8 is 73% of 60, and 32.9 is only 55% of 60). Perhaps having the sensor plane further from the lens than a film plane compensates for this; then you would just lose some of the square image at the top and bottom of the frame. There would be other compromises, though, such as not being able to use the camera's viewfinder. Would one keep the mirror flipped up to use this back?

Eyelike did, around 10 years ago. The 60mm square back cost around $70,000.

Sensor cost goes up exponentially with size. The 33x44mm (more or less) sensors are so expensive they end up in $8-15,000 cameras and backs. 36x48mm jacks that up closer to $20-30k, and the biggest currently available for civilian use, 39x52mm, end up in the $30-40k neighborhood.

This hasn't changed much in the last 10 years. If anything, prices have gone up a bit.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 27, 2014 at 00:00 UTC
In reply to:

Preamp: That 12.5MPx mode sounds nice. It will probably use a full "bayer quad" as a single pixel, effectively performing supersampling in-camera. Great way to get around demosaicking! Any samples around yet?

You can't get around demosiacing that way. The centers of the red and blue pixels are displaced, so the different color images are skewed in relation to each other, and you still need to interpolate everything into its correct location.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 26, 2014 at 15:28 UTC
In reply to:

Black Box: Finally a Hassy camera Luca Alessandrini hasn't put his mafioso hands on... yet!

After Blad's new owners gave to boot to Larry Hansen back in January, two of the first things that the new CEO Ian Rawcliffe did were to shut down Luca's Italian design center and to increase digital back development.

A new V system back is one way of saying "you and the horse you road in on" to Hansen, who discontinued the V and greenlighted Lunar, Stellar, and Solar.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 26, 2014 at 15:26 UTC
In reply to:

Wye Photography: Oh! I would have preferred 30 megapixels and full frame. I'll be able to afford this in ten years time when the price drops to a point I could feasibly purchase one. Maybe!

"now there's also Sony."

There's really no "also" there. Now there's Sony, period.

On Semiconductors bought the remains of the Kodak sensors division from Platinum Equity a couple of months ago, reportedly for 1/3 what Platinum paid for it. Their only remaining customers are in the smaller industrial sensors: red light cameras, inspection, etc.

Teledyne has pretty much refocused DALSA on line sensors.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 26, 2014 at 01:21 UTC
In reply to:

Joseph S Wisniewski: The picture showing the eye is either deliberately deceptive or totally misinformed. The radius of the eye is many times tighter than the Petzval surface of the eye's lens. That is why much of the retina forms a flat tension surface in front of the curved eyeball. The optical system, as drawn, would be substantially worse than a flat retina.

Eyeballs are round because eyes tilt and pan. That's all there is to it.

Certainly, you may ask. "Sony's approach", if you read their papers, is to induce physical stress in the silicon, in order to alter electron mobility and improve low-light sensitivity. The simplest way to stress a sensor in lab conditions is to bend it. Curvature is an unpleasant side-effect of this process.

Once you get past the lab experiments, there are ways of stressing a sensor in production quantities that retain all the many advantages of a flat sensor.

It appears that Sony's own PR people, with little to no understanding of the technology in play, have thrown out the baby and are making a tremendous fuss over the bathwater.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 18, 2014 at 06:11 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: There's a certain irony that Leica and Kodak already worked some of this out with curved microlenses in the sensor plane starting with the M8.

No, I'm afraid there's no irony there, at all. Fuji (first) then Canon, and then Kodak adopted "offset" microlenses, not curved ones. The lenses still form a flat plane, they just "look inward" to allow the sensor to make better use of the oblique angled rays from fast lenses or lenses with exit pupils closer to the sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 18, 2014 at 05:50 UTC

The picture showing the eye is either deliberately deceptive or totally misinformed. The radius of the eye is many times tighter than the Petzval surface of the eye's lens. That is why much of the retina forms a flat tension surface in front of the curved eyeball. The optical system, as drawn, would be substantially worse than a flat retina.

Eyeballs are round because eyes tilt and pan. That's all there is to it.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 18, 2014 at 05:47 UTC as 115th comment | 8 replies
In reply to:

MarcMedios: So... following Leica's journey from real camera to fashion accesory, Hasselblad --up until now the standard in large format photography-- has also become a fashion accesory and "certifies" cell phone cameras in an $11,000 cell phone. I don't know about the Swedes, but at least the Japanese had the inner strength to commit suicide when their dignity was lost.

I don't see where the GX645AF SLR ever became a rangefinder.

http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Fujifilm_GX645AF

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2014 at 01:50 UTC
In reply to:

MarcMedios: So... following Leica's journey from real camera to fashion accesory, Hasselblad --up until now the standard in large format photography-- has also become a fashion accesory and "certifies" cell phone cameras in an $11,000 cell phone. I don't know about the Swedes, but at least the Japanese had the inner strength to commit suicide when their dignity was lost.

Yes, it does. And the "baker" who keeps filling it with false information is too persistent to fight.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2014 at 01:19 UTC
In reply to:

Caleido: A brand selling out its name like this, is a chronicle of a death foretold.

Leica Camera still seems to be hanging in there.

The Zeiss Foundation is still around.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 10, 2014 at 01:08 UTC
In reply to:

MarcMedios: So... following Leica's journey from real camera to fashion accesory, Hasselblad --up until now the standard in large format photography-- has also become a fashion accesory and "certifies" cell phone cameras in an $11,000 cell phone. I don't know about the Swedes, but at least the Japanese had the inner strength to commit suicide when their dignity was lost.

Ah, but there is a Fuji to rebadge, the GX645AF series.

You note I'm "not specific about who did the engineering"? Did you miss this?

"It's easy to discover that Fuji designed, patented, tooled, and built every last bit of the H system, with one tiny exception. Hasselblad hired Teleca AB to create the interlock protocol that keeps Blad bodies from operating with "unapproved" digital backs such as Phase One."

I'm not sure how I could have been any more specific.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 10, 2014 at 01:06 UTC

It may be too little, too late, but in January, Blad's owners got rid of Dr. Larry Hansen, the guy who discontinued the V system, launched the Lunar, Stellar, and Solar, launched the Hasselblad botique store in Tokyo, set up Blad's Luca Alessandrin as the head of Blad's new design center in Italy, and set up this deal with Vertu.

Replacing him is Ian Rawcliffe, who so far has launched the CMOS digital back their first actual new medium format product since around 2005, and supposedly shut down the Italian design center and given Luca the old glutal boot.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 8, 2014 at 06:08 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

masticina: Daring and well for the rich it is a status symbol. At least this one doesn't looks horribly wrong! Because it is mostly a mobile phone with some more expensive materials used.

Yeah Hasselblad is pretty much dead.

Such a shame such a shame. Well I do hope for those who own a medium frame hasselblad that they will retain support for those as long as possible.

But yes where would they go after this.. an Hasselblad GoPro?
Rocky has a good point, Venture Capitalists don't care about your brand or product only that they get their moneys worth. And it seems that such is the end.

Well join the other big guys that failed.. end of the era. Begin of another this is how things go.

You are correct. A pretty aggressive outfit called Vorndran Mannheims Capital (formerly Ventizz Capital Fund) bought them from Shriro in 2011.

Rumor has it that the Blad purchase is scheduled for reevaluation on June 30, and the most likely outcome will be the shutdown and write-off of whatever is left of Blad.

The last time Blad was owned by VCs was back when cinven and UBS bought them back in 1996.

It's gone from bad to worse ever since. In 2003, the VCs sold Blad to Shriro, Blad's Asia-Pacific distributor. (Shriro is more well known for distributing back-hoes and cranes, they had no idea what to do with Blad, LOL).

Then VMC.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 8, 2014 at 05:36 UTC
In reply to:

MarcMedios: So... following Leica's journey from real camera to fashion accesory, Hasselblad --up until now the standard in large format photography-- has also become a fashion accesory and "certifies" cell phone cameras in an $11,000 cell phone. I don't know about the Swedes, but at least the Japanese had the inner strength to commit suicide when their dignity was lost.

No to your "no", LOL.

Modern Blads really are 100% rebadged Fujis. I researched this quite thoroughly, in response to the truly absurd claims of several Blad fans.

It's very easy to patent search the respective companies, and that will give you a pretty thorough list of the design staff of both. The sad truth is that UBS AG and CINven fired virtually every Blad engineer back in 1996 during their buyout of the financially crippled Hasselblad.

It's easy to discover that Fuji designed, patented, tooled, and built every last bit of the H system, with one tiny exception. Hasselblad hired Teleca AB to create the interlock protocol that keeps Blad bodies from operating with "unapproved" digital backs such as Phase One.

"Hasselblad" reacquired some electronics engineering capability back in 2004 when Blad's then owner, Shriro of Hong Kong bought Imacon and placed Blad's remaining assets under the control of Imacon management, but Fuji still did all the work on everything but digital backs

Direct link | Posted on Jun 8, 2014 at 05:19 UTC
In reply to:

MarcMedios: So... following Leica's journey from real camera to fashion accesory, Hasselblad --up until now the standard in large format photography-- has also become a fashion accesory and "certifies" cell phone cameras in an $11,000 cell phone. I don't know about the Swedes, but at least the Japanese had the inner strength to commit suicide when their dignity was lost.

The "core business, MF cameras" has just been repackaging Fuji medium format gear for the last decade or so.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 7, 2014 at 04:32 UTC
On Lost 1960s moon photos recovered from analog tapes article (43 comments in total)
In reply to:

bobbarber: What strikes me, as a guy who was alive back then, is that we went to the moon in the first place. No, we didn't have cell phones, and the only computer in school was a massive apparatus in its own room which you had to program with terse text commands. But we weren't quite as backwards as it might appear to the current generation. Making it to the moon was a serious accomplishment. That, and the Beatles.

"The political arena is WORSE"

Remember Watergate, the JFK assassination, Nam, Kent State, the race riots of the 60s?

"Phone Bills are WORSE"

No, adjusted for inflation, they're not. My first phone line, back in 1976, cost $11 a month. That's $44.42, for either 50 or 100 local calls (can't remember which, but I do remember "local" was about 6 miles. Farther away was a "zone call". $$$)

Then there was "long distance"). My last cell phone bill shows 228 minutes of long distance. Back in 1976 when I got my first phone line, that would have been $45.60 just for the long distance. Adjusted for inflation, that's $184.

Today, $220 a month would get you unlimited phone, cable, internet, cell,and mobile data.

You have any idea what a mobile phone cost in those days?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 26, 2014 at 18:48 UTC
On Lytro announces Illum light field camera article (346 comments in total)
In reply to:

aliasfox: Sports is an obvious use case. Sports news is usually viewed on the web or newsprint, so 5MP is fine. With the Lytro, the photographer never has to wait for any kind of focusing - no PDAF, no CDAF, no focus lag whatsoever. As soon as Lebron jumps to make his basket, the photographer hits the shutter, focuses later for the perfect shot every time.

With light field, it should be possible to imitate a FF camera at F/2.8 - set the lens at 85mm equivalent and get FF style portraits anytime. An event photographer could use this to tweak images to clients' desires ("I want Mom over there to be in focus" or "Blur the background more, it's too distracting"). It essentially decouples the artistic (DoF) from the exposure (aperture) equation.

Obviously, neither of these are necessarily common use cases, and this field (no pun intended) still has a ways to go. But if they keep developing it, who knows. In 3-4 years we might have a high ISO, fast shooting FF model with 120 MR/16MP output.

"With the Lytro, the photographer never has to wait for any kind of focusing - no PDAF, no CDAF, no focus lag whatsoever."

And yet, the first Lytro had a focusing mechanism. A particularly slow and poorly performing one, at that.

You don't get an infinite range of refocusing. You get in the DOF range of an f16 equivalent, and can then move a narrower (f5.6 equivalent) DOF within that f16 range.

Since you brought up sports, let's shoot that lens at the 250mm equivalent long end. Say your subject is at 50 feet. If you nail the autofocus (something the old Lytro seldom could do), you can now refocus over the range from 44.8-55.6 feet. Not an inch more.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 23, 2014 at 05:59 UTC
Total: 508, showing: 1 – 20
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