jkoch2

jkoch2

Joined on Jun 6, 2006

Comments

Total: 527, showing: 201 – 220
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In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I would like to know more about the 120 FPS and 240 FPS modes.

My hunch is that they work OK if you have very good light and shoot without shaking or panning the camera a lot. The image stabilization probably can't function at such high frame rates.

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 14:02 UTC
In reply to:

Cane: Why can't they just give an equivalent zoom range instead of saying 24x zoom, or whatever? That marketing drives me insane.

What does "600mm equivalent" mean to the average buyer? Do you rank students or employees by raw scores or by percentile rankings?

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 13:59 UTC
In reply to:

Grobb: Just another pinhead 1/2.3", 16 MP sensor superzoom, next :/
I would not trade my XZ-2 for it!
Bring on a 1" sensor semi compact camera to compete with Sony and Canon!
Give us a 24-120mm f2-4.0, very sharp lens, 3-axis IBIS, tilting touch screen and weather seal it. I'm looking forward to the rumored Fuji X30 or Nikon P8000.

You'd still stay with your XZ-2, unless the price for what you want were so low that Oly or the others could not make any money.

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 13:47 UTC
In reply to:

stevez: Not sure what Olympus is thinking here. Everything I read lately indicates that the compact camera market is dying. Perhaps super zooms are excluded from that? On the plus side, it might be a good camera for someone graduating from a phone camera.

Zoom and good image stabilization are the two areas where phone cameras lag. There is no certainty, however, that enough consumers will know or care. What is certain, however, is that sales of system cameras will never offset the loss of the P&S or compact markets. Can one fault Olympus for making a rear-guard effort to stave off complete shut-down of compact business?

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 13:45 UTC
In reply to:

Markol: These comments sound like those from 2009, except that now we do have several larger sensor compacts, so why complain? The target audience won't care and there is a large crowd wanting these travel zooms, believe it or not.
And people should start understanding that with these dimensions and focal lengths, a large sensor is not yet possible.

An unless smart phones suddenly gain weight and get big bulges, most travelers will not buy or use any larger sensor products.

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 13:36 UTC
In reply to:

peevee1: Did not SH-50 claim 5-axis stabilization too? Seems SH-1 is SH-50 in new body with TruePic VII processor...

The SH-50 also has 5-axis stabilization. The question is whether the newer processor yields better results.

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 13:33 UTC
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: If this was a Canon or Sony camera I would say that it would sell pretty well. However, it is an Olympus camera and their marketing isn’t nearly what their competitors is. This is just another run of the mill small sensor compact with an unreasonably long telephoto lens.

Sure it has some great features like the 5-axis IS, 120 FPS 720p, and Pen style design. However, its lens is just too slow at the long end. In all likelihood this won’t improve a novice users images over what they have right now.

I am still waiting for a better compact camera than the LX7 and RX100 II.

5-axis IBIS will help more than you think, and a long lens that works in good light sells beter than a fast-short one that will be bulky and still yield blur in low light. Any successors to the the LX7 nor the RX100 will either trade-off lens speed for length, or be like the RX10, which is much bigger and heavier. If all you want is a big sensor in a small body, you have the RX1.

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 13:22 UTC
In reply to:

Dvlee: Surprisingly, the Panasonic website does not offer any specifications.

Digging around, I learned that it has a sealed battery, USB charger input; built in mic, there does not seem to be an input for external mic.

What I would like to know is the optical specifications; focal length, zoom range, minimum focus distance, close up magnification, zoom and focus controls. The specs given above only say; Ultra wide angle up to 160dgs.

Looking at the video, I found the movements a little disturbing. ;sudden moves, tilted horizons, etc. One would have to learn to move ones head like a videographer. Same applies to using a Go Pro on a helmet mount. At least with a head mount you can take multiple views, hands free, and then edit the transitions out. But keeping horizon straight is a crapshoot because it might be hard to look at the monitor with a 160dg FoV.

The real potential with this camera is being able to squeeze it into tight places where even a Go Pro would not fit.

Look at a monitor instead of the vehicles, people, objects, or ravine you are about to crash into? An external mic could stick out of the helmet like a rhino horn or a Star Wars extra.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2014 at 19:54 UTC
On article Apple applies for dual-sensor camera patent (71 comments in total)
In reply to:

rfsIII: This sounds like the breakthrough we've been waiting for from the big camera companies.

Some employee at Canon or Nikon probably proposed multi-sensor cameras, instead of single large ones, years ago. The likely reply: "Can't do. Would challenge our DLSR and big lens business. Be careful or soon you'll get a pink slip."

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2014 at 13:25 UTC
On article Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 Review (499 comments in total)

High price = low score for "value." That might change, once the RX10ii with 4k video appears, and the RX10 price falls to $700.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2014 at 18:02 UTC as 86th comment
On article Hungarian law bans photos taken without consent (321 comments in total)

Another reason why smart phones will survive and traditional cameras will die out. Authorities cannot possibly police everyone who appears to use a phone, even if some snap pictures.

Public opinion at large, not just in certain countries, holds casual public photography in contempt. It is on par with soul-snatching or humiliation of the subjects. Property owners fear they will be reported for code violation or illegal renting. Spouses, employees, or public functionaries fear photos will be used as evidence of misbehavior. An Iowa law makes unapproved photography of farm property a felony, since someone was taking pictures of migrant worker shanties, confined animals, or manure dumps and run-off.

Trouble, trouble, trouble. Ban cameras. Out of sight, out of mind. Or wink and nod.

Meanwhile, there is widespread support for official or owner video surveillance of public spaces, workplaces, and private property of any sort. Might makes right.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2014 at 16:35 UTC as 29th comment | 1 reply
On article Red Giant offers subscription to video editing tools (26 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bassman2003: I think consumers do not trust the software makers to actually add great new features once they get the gravy train going. For many years, Adobe has come out with a new version rather than fix the bugs in the exisiting version. The only incentive for the companies was the fear that people would not purchase their upgrade if it did not have better features/performance. If the companies know you are paying no matter what, will they innovate or just phone it in? We will see...

The music or book publishers don't correct or update the editions either. To stay in business they must sell brand new titles every year, preferably to people who pay for a membership too. Adobe could not sell updates of CS every year, either, and make money under the permanent license method. Products like Avid, Roxio, Pinnacle, or Edius all die, or get flipped to vulture investors, because or falling revenue streams.

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2014 at 16:24 UTC
On article Red Giant offers subscription to video editing tools (26 comments in total)

Camera manufacturers might learn from the trend towards "cloud" and subscription-based services. It is hopeless to expect people to buy new gear every year or two. They could sell monthly or annual subscriptions to firmware, available at simple or advanced grades. Instead of gleaning chump change from occasional sales of gear, they could earn a steady annuity from owners whose cameras become useless if the subscriptions fall into arrears.

People lease vehicles, rent properties, and pay monthly utilities and cable fees. Every person's job depends on what they do every day, rather than what they made or did once. Why shouldn't camera makers adopt the same monthly milking model, rather than continue on their present doomed course?

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2014 at 13:19 UTC as 3rd comment
On article Judge strikes down fine against drone photographer (131 comments in total)

Bikes, hurtled baseballs, fireworks, dogs, booze, and even guns result in more injuries and fatalities than the little drones ever could. The people most likely to die in drone "accidents" are the owners who climb trees or climb ravines to recover ones that snare or crash. However, sooner or later, town councils will be compelled to impose ordinances based on fears that drones will be used for "spying" on picnics, hydrangias, disability cheats, or philandering spouses. Then only the police or NSA will have drones, and all will be happy. Right?

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2014 at 16:25 UTC as 11th comment
On article Judge strikes down fine against drone photographer (131 comments in total)
In reply to:

TN Args: At some point there will be general public control of use of drone quadricopters. They will become popular and a nuisance in public spaces. Their blades need protection from slashing skin or eyes. It is not clear when their camera is on, so 'up-skirt' shooting is too easy.

etc

A baseball collision with a head or face is probably more fatal.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2014 at 16:12 UTC
On article Behind the scenes: Garry Winogrand at work (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cane: It's funny how taking people pictures of strangers in the photography world has clout, but taking people pictures of those related to you (family pics) has none.

Candid family shots do have "clout." Photograph Aunt Bessie or Billy Bob without permission, and you get a painful clouting. The stealth shooter in public can either pretend to be making a phonecall, or be a fast runner.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2014 at 15:10 UTC
On article Judge strikes down fine against drone photographer (131 comments in total)
In reply to:

jkoch2: Amazon will cease dreams of drone use for deliveries, considering the costs.

Battery life is short. Payload is limited. The fate of most drones is to get stuck in trees or power lines. Others descend who-knows-where after the navigation or GPS functions fail. Heavy vibration mars video shot with the smaller contraptions. They are not as easy to control as some people think. Any drone robust enough to deliver multiple parcels on a planned route would have to be as big, fuel hungry, maintenance draining, and noisy as a small helicopter.

Physics: weight increases geometrically relative to size or chemical energy in batteries or fuel tanks. A frog the size of a human could not jump 15x body length. Control of fusion consumes nearly all the energy released. Flying cars, jet packs, (or delivery drones) would be notoriously expensive or dangerous to operate. Commercial aviation results in as many bankruptcies as survivors and relies a lot on subsidies, focus on hub ports, and people must get their own rides to the airports and back.

The greatest strides in technology have been in reducing the amount of physical motion required to find or share information. Actual delivery remains constrained by stuff like gravity.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2014 at 17:08 UTC
On article Judge strikes down fine against drone photographer (131 comments in total)

Amazon will cease dreams of drone use for deliveries, considering the costs.

Battery life is short. Payload is limited. The fate of most drones is to get stuck in trees or power lines. Others descend who-knows-where after the navigation or GPS functions fail. Heavy vibration mars video shot with the smaller contraptions. They are not as easy to control as some people think. Any drone robust enough to deliver multiple parcels on a planned route would have to be as big, fuel hungry, maintenance draining, and noisy as a small helicopter.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2014 at 14:13 UTC as 40th comment | 8 replies
On article Judge strikes down fine against drone photographer (131 comments in total)
In reply to:

iAPX: I plan to use Drone, but not for photography, more for video, notably on weddings: this is an incredible tool to have other point of view of any open place, or even in a church (when allowed, hard but possible).

Still photography might be an addition to that, but not my main goal.

Be careful. Drones make so much noise that wedding guest won't be able to hear the vows. Inside a church, the resonating roar and buzzing would be unbearable, like a chainsaw. Better to employ Quasimodo to climb up high to shoot video.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2014 at 13:25 UTC
Total: 527, showing: 201 – 220
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