jkoch2

jkoch2

Joined on Jun 6, 2006

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Total: 355, showing: 1 – 20
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On Pulitzer Prize 2014 winners announced for photography news story (27 comments in total)

The Lacy Atkins site, if one can excuse the "selfie" on the main page, includes various interesting photo series, including the one about the Oakland charter school. It features some motivated, engaged people. Unfortunately, most of the pictures portray very reluctant or bewildered young men. One appears to give up entirely. The learning experience seems reduced to passing unappetizing multiple choice proficiency exams. The school could probably use a music and choir director prior to a math drill sergeant. The enrollment selection process and voluntary nature may assure some improvement in scores or graduation rates, but that is a matter that photography does not convey very well, and which statistics can cloud too.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 15, 2014 at 13:49 UTC as 12th comment
On Past and present: NYC's changing streetscape news story (49 comments in total)

All the changes involve cases where one business failed, or could no longer be sustained. The replacements involve new efforts to "make a go of it." Most of the new storefronts are improvements.

Maybe half the new ventures will thrive. Others will hang on, but be a grind to keep going. A quarter will be gone in five years.

This is the normal process of competition or creative destruction. People who are tired of this are tired of life, or perhaps consumed by pixel-peeping dementia.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 14, 2014 at 19:38 UTC as 7th comment | 3 replies
On In photos: Taking the lid off America's trash cans news story (39 comments in total)
In reply to:

kadardr: Rubbish ideas from rubbish minds made rubbish picture. What a waste of talents. But the no soda, no sugar, no carbs life is a good idea: could and should make better pictures. Although, if rubbish pictures can change the world: why not?

Discarded water bottles are equally or more culpable. Why eschew carbs and then toss a plastic container that will be an eyesore for decades?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 14, 2014 at 13:13 UTC
On Atomos launches Shogun 4K external recorder news story (17 comments in total)
In reply to:

fdfgdfgdgf: In a few months all upcoming models will record 4K internally.

Yes, in just a few months sports video will start to migrate to 4k. To be precise, in June. People who see the Wold Cup on 65+" 4k screens won't accept anything less thereafter. Cheap Vizio displays and h.265 HEVC streaming will make it feasible.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2014 at 15:52 UTC
On Atomos launches Shogun 4K external recorder news story (17 comments in total)
In reply to:

utphoto: YouTube should not be considered a reference standard when comparing 720P to 1080P. The YouTube compression artifacts along with loss of detail pretty much render even YouTube 720P less than HD quality. Significant numbers of Bluray discs are sold to users who simply want the best current delivery method for 1080. I'm amazed at the number of people who watch degraded streaming video with poor quality on everything from iPhones to 55" plasmas and believe they're getting real HD quality. But a large majority of the public still assumes they're getting HD from DVDs just because their players are hooked up to a flatscreen TV. The public at large is completely technologically illiterate.

Maybe not so illiterate, or perhaps wiser than seems.

If iPhone is the viewing standard, isn't it a waste to employ anying over 320p / 3mbps? If a large flatscreen establishes one's social status, and the "HD" streams at only 6mbps, or is not available at all, does higher pixel count or scan rates add anything? Do the "Walking Dead" look any nicer?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2014 at 15:48 UTC
On NYT photo editor gives career tips for photojournalists news story (21 comments in total)

Newspaper lays off 300:
http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2014/04/layoffs_at_star-ledger_njcom_other_advance_newspapers_top_300_1.html

Photojournalism qualified as a real job when distribution of news images required expensive printing and physical distribution or broadcast equipment. Now it has become an ancillary task of anyone who, ignoring the numbers, pursue journalism as a career, and who will probably end up in anything but the legendary investigative reporter role. Professionals will continue to exist, but in small numbers, and more and more news or images will be disseminated by smart phones.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2014 at 14:13 UTC as 1st comment
On NYT photo editor gives career tips for photojournalists news story (21 comments in total)
In reply to:

Artpt: In response, up and coming photo journalists give NYT photo editor a beard trimmer....and some tips on effective hair conditioning products..

I am sorry...that was a cheap shot...please feel free to post your disgust...

Harmless humor intended of course...

Barbed wit will earn a job about as well as joking about your mentor's brand of camera. If bearded, find a mentor with a bigger beard.

Unfortunately, I doubt any photo editors at traditional dailies are looking for unsolicited mentees or work-samples, unless they meet qualifications that have little do to with photographic techniique. Besides work ethic, ambition, grooming, and good personal and writing skills, it probably helps to have some capital connections: mutual friends, mutual stints at some job, or (it can't hurt) ties to some "heavy" associated with the board, a major advertiser, or investor. However, if you overplay that factor, be ready for an early "good riddance" assignment to some dangerous place.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2014 at 18:37 UTC
On NYT photo editor gives career tips for photojournalists news story (21 comments in total)
In reply to:

kansasphotog: The problem with the idea of photojournalists becoming "dinosaurs" is that although everyone and their dog carries a camera/smartphone nowadays that does not make them a good photographer. PJ's are trained and successful ones, will not only be exceptional photographers...well above "citizen journalists" they also understand the concept of access. Put a good PJ next to someone that is not trained and you'll be able to tell who gives the more compelling photo. Just compare the Chicago Sun-Times reporters that carry iPhones with the PJ staff at The Chicago Tribune....not even close.

It's great that folks love photography but still, the professionals will always get the best shot. As photographers we all should care what makes a good photo technically AND emotionally.

The local with a phone camera does not need a visa, escort, body guard, translator, plane ticket, insurance plan, 5D and lenses, nor even a mentor. The local can capture an event as it happens and under the radar of officials liable to censor or discourage "professional" shots. Any video need not comply with any "stinkin' broadcast standards" if it scoops the story.

Meanwhile, most of the "professionals" time and expense is spent on official events or belated coverage of the usual fires, floods, collisions, or road repairs, if not wasted in getting somewhere too late.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2014 at 18:24 UTC

Best wishes to contestants. Don't be discouraged by jaundiced opinions that "humanitarian" shots must depict suffering or oppression; or that, to that end, they must be furtive, voyeuristic, ideological, or staged. Surely a cheery depiction of hometown innocence, hope, or humor might win honorable mention.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2014 at 14:06 UTC as 5th comment
In reply to:

jkoch2: 4.2.2 4k over HDMI to external recorder? This limits use to tripod and dolly shots with slow set-up and staged action for which there are already various dedicated studio cameras available.

More practical: 4.2.0 4k that records 4k internally to economical cards, with either 5-axis stabilization or gyro-based Balanced Optical Steadyshot. A large sensor is no help if it demands slow readout that aggravates rolling shutter. Any casual video shot in 4k will require a moderate depth of field, or else be marred by focus-hunting or missed focus. A 1/1.7" or three 1/2.3" sensors should be fine for that and produce less heat too. Built-in ND filters great too.

4k successors to the X920, PJ790, G6, GX7, LX7, or HX400 could offer this. Canon or Nikon could, too, but will probably wait 4-5 years. An RX100iii or RX10ii might also succeed, if only the stabilizers and (slow) read-outs improved to reduce jello and banding of hand-held shots that afflict the AX-100 with the same 1" sensor.

The PXW-Z100 is a shoulder-tote camera that shoots 4.2.2 4k. The $3.5k FDR-AX1 and $2k consumer AX100 offer XAVC-S 4k at lower costs. All allow internal 4k capture of some sort without need for an external recorder. The GH4 will also capture 4.2.0 internally. I need 4.2.2 about as much as I need an 18-wheel truck or a 50 meter pool stocked with hungry mermaids.

"Sling the recorder around your shoulders." Yeah, like a tuba, a chimpanzee, or a 1979-vintage Betacam.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 7, 2014 at 16:16 UTC
In reply to:

jkoch2: 4.2.2 4k over HDMI to external recorder? This limits use to tripod and dolly shots with slow set-up and staged action for which there are already various dedicated studio cameras available.

More practical: 4.2.0 4k that records 4k internally to economical cards, with either 5-axis stabilization or gyro-based Balanced Optical Steadyshot. A large sensor is no help if it demands slow readout that aggravates rolling shutter. Any casual video shot in 4k will require a moderate depth of field, or else be marred by focus-hunting or missed focus. A 1/1.7" or three 1/2.3" sensors should be fine for that and produce less heat too. Built-in ND filters great too.

4k successors to the X920, PJ790, G6, GX7, LX7, or HX400 could offer this. Canon or Nikon could, too, but will probably wait 4-5 years. An RX100iii or RX10ii might also succeed, if only the stabilizers and (slow) read-outs improved to reduce jello and banding of hand-held shots that afflict the AX-100 with the same 1" sensor.

Samsung may be less glacial. Meanwhile, 4k phones and POV gadgets will improve and possibly decimate the market before 4k cameras or camcorders appear.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 7, 2014 at 13:30 UTC

4.2.2 4k over HDMI to external recorder? This limits use to tripod and dolly shots with slow set-up and staged action for which there are already various dedicated studio cameras available.

More practical: 4.2.0 4k that records 4k internally to economical cards, with either 5-axis stabilization or gyro-based Balanced Optical Steadyshot. A large sensor is no help if it demands slow readout that aggravates rolling shutter. Any casual video shot in 4k will require a moderate depth of field, or else be marred by focus-hunting or missed focus. A 1/1.7" or three 1/2.3" sensors should be fine for that and produce less heat too. Built-in ND filters great too.

4k successors to the X920, PJ790, G6, GX7, LX7, or HX400 could offer this. Canon or Nikon could, too, but will probably wait 4-5 years. An RX100iii or RX10ii might also succeed, if only the stabilizers and (slow) read-outs improved to reduce jello and banding of hand-held shots that afflict the AX-100 with the same 1" sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 7, 2014 at 13:30 UTC as 36th comment | 5 replies

ABC: "It’s unclear if the shooter was an actual policeman or an insurgent dressed in police uniform."

Is there really much difference? Perhaps 60% of the hungry people that don the uniform are suspicious or resentful of foreigners, and probably worried how to survive if the Taliban win amnesty or elections. The other 39% may be kin or agents of the Taliban. The other 1% are well aware of the prospects and have sheltered their fortunes and families accordingly.

The shooter may have to spend a few weeks in detention, until the next hostage exchange, and reside in Pakistan a few months, before resuming his assaults or receiving promotion.

A sad event. But do we label "brave" what is entirely forseeable, avoidable, and fruitless? Alas, more condolences may be in store, since the situation seems more likely to get worse than better.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2014 at 17:37 UTC as 68th comment | 1 reply
On Canon launches XF205 and XF200 HD professional camcorders news story (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: What is crazy is that this camcorder is labeled as “Professional” because it sticks to the antiquated specs that broadcasters demand. However, cameras like the Panasonic GH4 are called “Toys” when they shoot 4k @ 30 FPS video with capabilities for high quality audio and 4:2:2 10 bit color.

Being “Professional” no longer means it is better. It just means that it meets a standard required for a specific job.

"Professional" usually means that the ports and plugs conform to the sorts of 60s-vintage cables and connections used in the broadcast world. SDI or even jumbo coaxial, but not USB3 or HDMI.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2014 at 13:48 UTC
On Canon launches XF205 and XF200 HD professional camcorders news story (69 comments in total)

"Broadcast Standard" video spec is being superseded by newscasts based on video shot with phones at the scene of the event or action. The gear wagon that arrives 12 or 24 hours later will be used mainly to capture images of authorities claiming "everthing under control," or else placing blame on others--either of which are very tedious to watch.

Odd that Canon has not tried to offer a videocamera with internal gyro stabilization, which might be quite helpful for handheld shots, and better than conventional lens or sensor digital stabilization.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2014 at 13:45 UTC as 20th comment | 2 replies
On Canon launches XF205 and XF200 HD professional camcorders news story (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peter K Burian: A lot of photographers wish Canon were spending time/money to develop new lenses for DSLRs instead. Like the LONG awaited replacement for the 100-400mm L zoom.

Is there really a huge demand for expensive video gear that's not already being met by Canon AND the many competing manufacturers? Just asking...

Canon reply: Have a nice day.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2014 at 13:24 UTC
On Shockproof flagship: Olympus 'drops' new Tough TG-3 news story (106 comments in total)
In reply to:

Simon Zeev: Nice camera, but for being a true diving camera seed to be water proof to 40m at last.

At depths of 40m, there usually isn't enough light or color to shoot good photos anyway. The strobes and supporting gear for serious shots at such depths cost, per diem, a great multiple of the price of a T3 or any other tool for occasional snorkeling or reef dives.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 16:56 UTC
On Shockproof flagship: Olympus 'drops' new Tough TG-3 news story (106 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: Shooting without RAW underwater is a very difficult thing to do.

It helps to have a face mask and know how to swim. A snorkel or scuba can help. If the water is murky or the light low, RAW won't help. Nor will it help if 99.99% of users have no idea what RAW is. In good light and clear water, good on-board color filter or WB adjustment is enough. Most of your worries will be about salt water invading the seals after a few dives or after you open the chambers to charge the battery or swap the card. Sand, grit, or breakdown of the seals can bring eventual calamity.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 16:50 UTC
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I would like to know more about the 120 FPS and 240 FPS modes.

My hunch is that they work OK if you have very good light and shoot without shaking or panning the camera a lot. The image stabilization probably can't function at such high frame rates.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 14:02 UTC
In reply to:

Cane: Why can't they just give an equivalent zoom range instead of saying 24x zoom, or whatever? That marketing drives me insane.

What does "600mm equivalent" mean to the average buyer? Do you rank students or employees by raw scores or by percentile rankings?

Direct link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 13:59 UTC
Total: 355, showing: 1 – 20
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