pixtorial

Lives in United States Nowhere, IN, United States
Joined on Feb 7, 2012
About me:

An avid amateur photographer who moved to digital in 2003. Today I mostly focus on dance (ballet and contemporary) photography and a growing interest in nature work.

Comments

Total: 19, showing: 1 – 19
In reply to:

MrTaikitso: Professionally done, but visual evidence of why cities are not fit for human occupation. No green spaces or wide walking streets, just the odd tree - unlike cities built hundreds of years ago. So you live on level 50 of a glass tower. No garden to tend, park for the kids to run about in playing football. We appear to be creating a world that will be aesthetically interesting in a video game (and to blow up, such as in Battlefield 4), but that is detrimental to our QOL. (Quality Of Life.)

Anyway, this is a photography forum, so I will get off my high tower and be gone. ;)

Go to the scene at 3:38, there is a park that spans the top of three buildings. Then, there is always Wyoming if you need more space :)

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2016 at 19:45 UTC
In reply to:

daddyo: No problem, all of the people in Singapore are moving to Austin, TX along with the entire East and West Coasts of the US. Geez!

P.S. This is a pretty impressive time lapse.

And thus is the reason I left Austin. I would hazard that Singapore may actually be easier to get around in :)

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2016 at 19:43 UTC
In reply to:

SaltLakeGuy: I was and am a huge fan of Nikon in general having spent many thousands of $$ with them over the years on their pro gear. However looking at these examples makes me that much more comfortable with having switched over to a Sony A7RII and their top lenses. I've no doubt the D5 will find it's place into many a photographers hand so no worries there.

Go to any event, sports, racing, politics, stage, and see what pro shooters are using. D4/D4x, 1Dx, the occasional D300S, 5Dmk3, or old D3X thrown in, all with a Gold Strip or White constant aperture zoom or f2 tele in front (or the odd Sigma EX here and there). I'm just a pretender with my gripped D610. Those promoting the E-M1 and A7 series as pro cameras are Olympus and Sony endorsed pros shooting free gear. Those who really need the megapixel count and shooting the A7II or D810 for fashion and editorial are likely killing time until their first Hassy. Sony would LOVE for you to believe that the A7 series are pro cameras, but they simply are not.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2016 at 03:10 UTC
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1592 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kiwisnap: I shoot full frame - Nikon D3s, D810 and Leica Q.

I'm looking for a different 'upgrade path': one to a place with less weight and bulk.

I will probably be buying a comprehensive M43 system to fulfil that need, because no other camera system can.

I accept M43 is not perfect for IQ, PDAF and so on but, in the form of the OMD EM-1 and it's successor, it's a pretty fair stab at a 'mini dslr' and I can live with or work round the limitations. I can no longer live with or work round the weight of my FX system when on the road. I'll be keeping it for specific work but I expect the M43 will get a lot more use.

I've been shooting m4/3 side by side with Nikon DX and FX for about four months now and it has been great. Different ducks for different ponds, but both systems are capable tools.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2016 at 17:24 UTC
In reply to:

joelakeland: They look okay but not groundbreaking and still behind APS-C's better offerings. I really did not like the portrait and waffle having that hideous poster effect...you might as well been using a 12mp camera.

I still want one when on sale for black & white shooting.

The Pen F is not meant to be a FF Nikon DSLR. I shoot both m4/3 and FF Nikon and the cameras serve vastly different purposes for me. That said, my E-M10ii surprises me time and again with what it can produce for such a small package.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2016 at 02:20 UTC
In reply to:

villagranvicent: Besides the form factor -I played with this camera at Yodobashi store and it is very nice- I don't see anything special in the pictures it produces, they look ok, like anything else. At this price I would pick an X-Pro2 over this any day.

Same could be said for the X-Pro2, plus it is bigger, the Fuji glass is lovely but considerably more expensive, and any of the m4/3 cameras will run circles around the Xtrans cameras for video. Different ducks for different ponds.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2016 at 02:18 UTC
In reply to:

FantasticMrFox: In contrast to most of the commenters I'm somewhat disappointed - how is this a review? Felt more like a lesson on the history of local Blues, but I hardly learnt anything about the camera.

More important, I could care less what she is shooting with, her photographs speak from the heart.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2016 at 02:14 UTC
In reply to:

sunilkumar: i saw one image at 150 mm 1.8 at video length 4:56. is there a lens of 150 mm 1.8 or its typo?

Great article, i love it.

m4/3 cameras have a 2x crop factor, they were tagging the photos with their 35mm equivalent focal length. The lens is the excellent Olympus 75mm f/1.8.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2016 at 02:11 UTC
In reply to:

pixtorial: .. as for the Pen-F, this review shows clearly that it is its own m4/3 camera when compared to the OM-D series especially. The bigger question I think becomes this: Pen F or GX8? Or even GX85?

I enjoyed seeing the context of the photos taken and shared here. I think it goes to show that the end result is what matters. No, the Pen F doesn't shoot like a full frame DSLR, and it isn't a Leica. But a Pen F and a couple of nice primes cost less than many a FF body and gives you a diminutive kit for travel and street photography. There are several things I think I would prefer over my OM-D E-M10ii, including the fully articulating LCD.

Great video, a useful experiential review, and would love to see more stuff like this!

Ok, so I was asking for it bringing up the FF comparison. I have and regularly shoot a D610, but also have and enjoy my OM-D and those tiny Olympus primes. Two different ducks for two different ponds.

Link | Posted on Apr 11, 2016 at 20:54 UTC
In reply to:

ozturert: At 10:42; I see 150mm @f1.8. One heck of a lens :)
Very good video, thanks.

I love my 75mm f/1.8, it was the reason I bought into Olympus and is one of the overall best lenses in my bag between both my m4/3 and Nikon FF kits.

Link | Posted on Apr 11, 2016 at 13:28 UTC

.. as for the Pen-F, this review shows clearly that it is its own m4/3 camera when compared to the OM-D series especially. The bigger question I think becomes this: Pen F or GX8? Or even GX85?

I enjoyed seeing the context of the photos taken and shared here. I think it goes to show that the end result is what matters. No, the Pen F doesn't shoot like a full frame DSLR, and it isn't a Leica. But a Pen F and a couple of nice primes cost less than many a FF body and gives you a diminutive kit for travel and street photography. There are several things I think I would prefer over my OM-D E-M10ii, including the fully articulating LCD.

Great video, a useful experiential review, and would love to see more stuff like this!

Link | Posted on Apr 11, 2016 at 13:27 UTC as 100th comment | 4 replies

Ok, DPR, this is far and away one of the best videos you've ever posted. It isn't the first experiential review video you've done, but this one raised the bar way up there. Let me tell you about everything you did right with this:

- You found an outstanding photographer to showcase in Claire, definitely someone I will take the time to follow more closely. She brings a viewpoint both photographically and philosophically beyond her years.

- You put the review in the middle of a region of the US that is so rich with history and yet is so unknown to too many people. To those not familiar with the Mississippi delta, the places and people Claire interviewed are the real deal.

- Claire and the DPR team treated the places and people with such reverence. This is important, it could have easily come off as some sort of hipster road trip, but the way this was presented brought much more respect to the subject than that.

- The footage of Jimmy Duck Holmes is priceless, gave me chills.

Link | Posted on Apr 11, 2016 at 13:23 UTC as 101st comment | 1 reply
On article Upwardly mobile: Sony a6300 Review (2122 comments in total)

Sorry, have to join the voices that see this as yet another suspiciously favorable review of a Sony product. There is no question, the Sony E-mount and FE-mount cameras produce fantastic images and video. This is offset by still-questionable ergonomics, unspoken issues with overheating when shooting continuous video, an endlessly unbalanced native e-mount lens lineup, and a dozen questions of how DPR awarded the A6300 a Gold Award.

I shoot APS-C and FF Nikon and m4/3, and for this class of camera Panasonic remains the company to beat (as much as I love Olympus).

And yes, I had invested in and shot Sony E-mount up until the beginning of this year and finally got fed up with video overheating and no new mid-range native E-mount glass (the new FE lenses are fantastic glass at a price that is out of reach of all but well healed enthusiasts and pros).

Link | Posted on Apr 7, 2016 at 12:05 UTC as 145th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: Any particular reason that DPReview notes the updated raw capacity to the not very good ADSee raw extractor, but skips noting the recent update to Aftershot? Aftershot is much better raw extraction software than ADSee. (No Aftershot is not up to the level of ACR, C1, DXO or PhotoNinja, but why ignore the recent update to Aftershot? And I’d bet that with some work Aftershot could play with the really serious raw extractors, unlike ADSee.)

DPReview has always seemed to depend on the manufacturers to push news and updates to them. It is why you don't see, for example, routine update information for Iridient (Raw) Converter or other niche products as they don't have dedicated marketing folks pushing announcements out to every web outlet.

Link | Posted on Jul 29, 2013 at 12:14 UTC

As some others here, I find the exclusion of Corel Aftershot Pro (fka Bilbble) puzzling. The current build of Aftershot is a capable, if not entirely perfect, RAW conversion and asset management platform with some unique features the other offerings here do not have. It is cross-platform, has been around I believe longer than the three products that were tested, and can be had for practically shareware prices.

Aftershot needs some investment for some cameras in its color profiles, and its asset management features are not as mature as these other products. It has superior speed, especially with multicore AMD support. I also believe that it renders, for many camera systems, with better acutance without added sharpening.

While many here have also argued that Aperture should have been included, it is unfortunately falling behind the other offerings. Somewhere along the way the vision and spirit of earlier versions of Aperture have been lost, and I worry for its future.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2013 at 15:25 UTC as 101st comment | 1 reply
On article Exhibition Review: 8x10 By Impossible (85 comments in total)

Polaroid prints have often been undervalued in the photographic community. I don't know if it is something about the seemingly "amateurish" (itself an abused term) status of the film, the often imperfect results, or what. This has been true even more of large format Polaroid, even though it is a demonstrably capable medium on many levels and by artists of all caliber.

The overuse of digital techniques that emulate different analog processes should not be allowed to devalue the beauty of those processes. The unique, one-of-a-kind, and often stunning Polaroid print or transfer is a great example of this. Aesthetically some of these prints are not my favorite, but the medium is capable of much more than the art depicted here. Walker Evans and Ansel Adams are just two artists who demonstrated well the potential of the format.

To the nay sayers here, I guess all I can suggest is that you further explore the body of work in this medium before so easily condemning it...

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2012 at 02:56 UTC as 28th comment
In reply to:

raylob: Very convenient to have & to use. IQ is acceptable but you pay dearly for the consumables!
Ray

These little Selphy printers are all dye-sub models. Dye sublimation printers are continuous tone, three color thermal transfer technology. The overall output gamut of a dye sub is less than that of say a six color inkjet printer. They are additive CMY, and in general cannot approach the black density of other technologies. They do produce fairly vibrant color, and the continuous tone prints look nice enough.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2012 at 16:20 UTC
In reply to:

JoeSchmoe: The quality of these samples is embarrassing. Seems like DPR doesn't put much effort into taking non-technical photos anymore. For much better ones, see Robin Wong's review:

http://robinwong.blogspot.com/2012/07/olympus-mzuiko-75mm-f18-review-street.html

I completely agree with you, there are substantial issues with these photos across the board. Non-critical focus, focused everywhere but the eyes, little or no attention paid to background, therefore leaving us just to guess at what quality of bokeh the glass may have. I won't even get started on exposure and color grading.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2012 at 15:11 UTC
In reply to:

qwertyasdf: Wow, über sharp
But let's face it, it's not comparable with the Canon 135L for portrait pictures, the canon melts the bg completely.
But the oly can easily be the better landscape lens, it's much more portable

I wouldn't classify lenses as "portrait" or "landscape" lenses by their focal length alone. There are plenty of examples of phenomenal landscape photographs taken with lenses > 50mm, just as I've seem some remarkable people photographs taken with lenses < 35mm.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2012 at 15:09 UTC
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