Vlad S

Vlad S

Lives in United States San Francisco, CA, United States
Works as a Scientist
Joined on May 11, 2010

Comments

Total: 298, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Paul B Jones: A true gentleman, with good words for other brands:

Q: What competitive cameras do you use as your benchmark for performance?

A: Digital SLRs. Mid-range and high-end DSLRs like Canon’s EOS 7D Mark II, for example. Canon did a good job with that camera.

I would rather say, a true diplomat. Denies nothing, commits to nothing, aside from the current product lines.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 28, 2015 at 17:32 UTC
In reply to:

Wolfgang Fieger: There will be the need for prisms or mirrors as they want to put 2 sensors in the optical path with only one lens....

E.g., one is the main imaging sensor, and another sensor in the viewfinder window path. Done and done!

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2015 at 18:38 UTC
In reply to:

Wolfgang Fieger: There will be the need for prisms or mirrors as they want to put 2 sensors in the optical path with only one lens....

Rangefinder by definition views the scene through two different lenses. It uses the resulting parallax difference to determine the distance to the subject.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2015 at 06:31 UTC
In reply to:

bgbs: It's amazing that these guys begin photography, but their photographs look better in composition and lighting than what most can produce today.

Composition? Sure – but composition was already well understood for centuries from paintings. Lighting? Uhm, no. Blown highlights and plugged shadows everywhere. But that does not distract from the sentimental value of these prints.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2015 at 05:05 UTC
In reply to:

GrayC: 30mm macro is the same price...

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1124341-REG/panasonic_h_hs030_lumix_g_macro_30mm.html

Same as what?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 23, 2015 at 20:53 UTC
In reply to:

Vlad S: I really like the winning photo from the artistic point of view. But I can't see how it highlights anything at all. It is extremely ambiguous in its meaning.

@BadScience: the commentary highlights that. But the photo, the image itself, does not (IMO) contain any notion of oppression, or location, or relationship between the characters (it could be a non-sexual relationship in this image). My issue with it is that the image does not tell the story, the story is told in the caption, and strictly speaking, the image does not really add anything to it. The image by itself is simply a lovely exercise in chiaroscuro.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 21:27 UTC
In reply to:

rurikw: Since this thread has strayed from photography right from the start I take the opportunity to ask a a non-photographic question. There is one thing about the russian gay propaganda law that confounds me. It renders punishable actions intended to impart upon minors perverted ideas of the equal social value of traditional and non-traditional sexual relations. (Not the official translation which I couldn't find but accurate enough I believe). How do you distinguish the perverted ideas from the non-perverted ideas of said equality, which, according to the law, can be imparted without fear of punishment? Is that distinction defined somewhere?

Any ideas of equivalence of non-traditional sexual relations are presumed perverted a priori. It's a law that postulates moral norms, and claims all deviations to be immoral.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 21:20 UTC

I really like the winning photo from the artistic point of view. But I can't see how it highlights anything at all. It is extremely ambiguous in its meaning.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 17:44 UTC as 38th comment | 2 replies
On CP+ 2015: Sony shows off new technology article (216 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gesture: apodization optical element

Fantastic.

I wonder if it's from their current 135mm STF lens, or from some perspective lens.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2015 at 21:47 UTC
On CP+ 2015: Sony shows off new technology article (216 comments in total)
In reply to:

ZeevK: Arithmetically means that Pitch & Yaw is compensated by lateral movement of IBIS system in X and Y. The amount of movement is determined by detected angle and knowledge the focal length of the lens.

Actually, correcting Pitch and Yaw is the main if not the only reason that IBIS requires to be informed of the true focal length of the lens. This "algorithmic" correction of Pitch & Yaw was implemented from day one of Minolta IBIS introduced in Dynax/Maxum 7D and following models.

@marc petzold: actually, it was Minolta Dimage – way before Konica bought them.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2015 at 21:11 UTC
In reply to:

SeeRoy: "Despite being very small indeed, the E-M5 is peppered with physical control points. In fact, in our initial testing, we're equivocal about this. On the one hand, physical control is great, but depending on how you have the camera set up, it is quite easy to accidentally knock a dial, or press the wrong button and end up doing something you didn't mean to do."
Which is precisely why the (original) EM5 is the most infuriating camera I have owned. Constantly finding myself looking at a VF which is in a different mode to that in which I left it. Most days when I use it I'd like to cut it in half - usually just after missing a shot.

@art99 one of the top wheels defaults to the shutter speed dial, and you can customize front or rear wheel.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 14, 2015 at 18:42 UTC
In reply to:

SeeRoy: "Despite being very small indeed, the E-M5 is peppered with physical control points. In fact, in our initial testing, we're equivocal about this. On the one hand, physical control is great, but depending on how you have the camera set up, it is quite easy to accidentally knock a dial, or press the wrong button and end up doing something you didn't mean to do."
Which is precisely why the (original) EM5 is the most infuriating camera I have owned. Constantly finding myself looking at a VF which is in a different mode to that in which I left it. Most days when I use it I'd like to cut it in half - usually just after missing a shot.

I think it's just a matter of practice. When I got E-M5 I also kept pushing buttons unintentionally, but quickly I have adjusted and I don't this problem any longer.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 14, 2015 at 18:36 UTC
In reply to:

Demerzel: Interesting camera. I would like to see comparison images of the same scenes from this camera and the 810. Images such as portraits, landscape, low light shots, etc. Enabling me to see the effect of the new filter on regular shooting. This may be an all-round camera and we don't know it.

@Petka: I can't tell if the color shift you observed is related to IR sensitivity. The issue would be your individual sensitivity to that part of the spectrum. There are always deviations from one individual to another, and I don't know if they can be sufficiently strong to cause what you describe.

@chris_j_l I actually have not seen any mention of the transmittance spectrum of the D810A filters. If they wanted to transmit H-alpha, but block the IR, they would have no trouble finding filters or hot mirrors with an extremely sharp transmission cut-off – about 20nm interval is very common, and probably would be sufficient.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 11, 2015 at 09:00 UTC
In reply to:

Demerzel: Interesting camera. I would like to see comparison images of the same scenes from this camera and the 810. Images such as portraits, landscape, low light shots, etc. Enabling me to see the effect of the new filter on regular shooting. This may be an all-round camera and we don't know it.

@sharkcookie H-alpha is not IR, it's solidly in the visible spectrum. I have done a laboratory experiment on measuring visible spectrum of hydrogen with hundreds of students, and I have not come across a single one who could not see H-alpha emission with naked eye.

In the past there have been consumer cameras fairly sensitive to IR. Minolta Dimage 7 comes to mind – it was a popular choice for IR photography without any modifications. The only detectable color shift was in very dark areas – typically black fabrics would sometimes look brownish or purplish. It could be prevented with an IR mirror, but it was such a minor annoyance that not many people bothered with it.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 11, 2015 at 07:02 UTC
In reply to:

Craig from Nevada: This camera targets a very narrow market segment.

I wonder how deep the market segment is for full-frame astrophotography? How many cameras they need to sell to breakeven and who percentage of the market this represents?

This move makes sense. The DSLR world is changing and this is a niche that might be profitable.

@rrccad D810A IS full spectrum, the difference is that its red filter in the Bayer array is tuned to 656 nm. But it does capture all other colors – you can see that from the samples. The landscape samples look pretty natural, without any color casts. I am sure that its general purpose aplication is just a matter of roper color profiling. Sony, Kodak, and I think Fuji have produced cameras with non-standard color filters, and they worked perfectly fine for general purpose photography.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 23:45 UTC
In reply to:

Craig from Nevada: This camera targets a very narrow market segment.

I wonder how deep the market segment is for full-frame astrophotography? How many cameras they need to sell to breakeven and who percentage of the market this represents?

This move makes sense. The DSLR world is changing and this is a niche that might be profitable.

@rrccad I think you need to compare the cost of the QHY cameras with the price difference between the D810 and D810A. Because you can also use the Nikon for the general photography, or to shoot landscape astro, but with with the QHY products you still would have to buy a full frame camera to match the Nikon range of uses.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 18:35 UTC
In reply to:

Cannockwolf: Does this camera shoot infrared straight out of the box? isnt 656 nm deep no colour ir photography? im sure my converted D200 is 650nm, are they missing a selling point or have i got the wrong point?

No, the 656nm light is very clearly visible to the naked eye as red color. Wavelengths above 700nm become invisible to an average human eye. This article has a picture of how the hydrogen emission lines appear to the naked eye: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balmer_series

I think that your D200 filter has a window centered at 650 nm. The hydrogen emission is 656 nm, and can increase in the wavelength due to the expansion of the universe, but I don't know if the significantly shifted objects would be sufficiently bright to be visible without a telescope.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 18:10 UTC
On Apple reveals Photos beta for developers post (125 comments in total)
In reply to:

idr: I have Aperture and some 40 000 pics from 80's until today rated 1-5 so I can have e.g. compact smart album to show just the best pics. Now Photos has only the Favorite option? One option?

Maybe I'll just delete 35 000 pics and then the Favorite option will do?

Has anyone at Apple used Photos? Do they just grab a new iPhone and see what happens when you shoot a day..? "Great, I can tag Favorites!!!"

That would be strange. Even iPhoto has a 5 star rating system that can be used for filtering.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 18:15 UTC
On Apple reveals Photos beta for developers post (125 comments in total)
In reply to:

guido1953: Apple no longer supporting Aperture and then not providing a quad core i7 processor in the new 2014 Mac Mini was all I needed to jump ship.

Building my own PC was in the bucket list. It was not hard at all to plan and build my new PC.So for $1200 I built a Haswell i7.It was amazing how easy it all has been.The only major difference between the two operating systems is you HAVE to invest in virus and spy/malware software.

So after importing 150 gigs of photos into Lightroom with 50 gigs left I can say Lightroom is ok. I can live with it very well.
Not as stable as Aperture,but Version 6 is supposed to address this issue.

Best Regards,
Guido

I had to use Windows 8 a few months ago. As far as frustrating events in my life goes, it rates pretty high up.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 02:36 UTC
In reply to:

Sirandar: This is a very interesting case.

It seems that there is a fine line between licensing and photograph and licensing a posture or pose. There are certain requirements for patenting a pose, dance or other body movements. It doesn't seem that the photographer Jacobus Rentmeester has any claims to the open legged basketball posture shown in the picture.

BUT .... there are many angles and perspectives to shoot that open legged posture from. Did Nike deliberately choose one very similar to that of licensed pic tire by Jacobus Rentmeester? If so I would say Nike breached the conditions of the license by re-shooting it and should pay the photographer accordingly.

The 30 year period is irrelevant as all the parties are still alive and have interest.

Copyright and patent are different things. Rentmeester did not patent the pose, he holds the copyright for an image of Michael Jordan jumping with a ball in the left hand and legs stretched against a flat background. It's a work of art, and the copyright violation is decided based on the transformative aspect of the derivative work – not just the pose alone.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 31, 2015 at 05:26 UTC
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