PlainOrFancy

PlainOrFancy

Joined on Aug 2, 2012

Comments

Total: 20, showing: 1 – 20
On CP+ 2014: Things we found that had been cut in half article (107 comments in total)
In reply to:

BobORama: I want to know HOW they cut them in half. I've done this on a small scale for metallurgical specimen preparation. Same thing just bigger?

With an axe. Really fast.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 16, 2014 at 14:25 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M1 Review preview (2059 comments in total)
In reply to:

PenGun: Makes no sense to me. The Fuji X cameras will just murder it in almost every way and cost less.

Murder is a very strong word. Let's just say this piece of equipment is not for you and move on.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 10, 2013 at 21:18 UTC

Fair enough, if you want the viewfinder, this is an upgrade. I've used the P7700 for half a year now, and my favorite feature is the so-called Quick Control dial; I use it all the time to set sensitivity and custom picture modes. I'm sure trading in the dial for the VF was a hard decision for Nikon to make. For me, this new iteration isn't as desirable a compact camera.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 10, 2013 at 21:12 UTC as 7th comment
On Olympus OM-D E-M1 Review preview (2059 comments in total)

"Whereas Olympus was trying to keep the clean front surface to evoke the simplicity of the film OM cameras, the E-M1 is clearly working to appeal to more advanced enthusiasts."
I take your point, certainly, but am happy to have "advanced" to preferring it clean. To me it felt liberating going from the E-30, which has a button-to-real-estate quotient quite like the E-M1, to the sleeker layout on the E-M5. Everything can be set up in presets anyway, if you know what situations you're heading into. The E-M1 just seems different, not better, and it's not for me (any longer). Just my two cents.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 10, 2013 at 10:16 UTC as 475th comment
In reply to:

Red Swan: Doing re-art of an art is an art by itself IMHO. And I like her work too. :)

I agree. Her images can be considered separate works. It has a long tradition :)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2013 at 19:50 UTC
In reply to:

mzillch: Most of these original artists are long dead and never made any public statements regarding their stand on having their works adulterated. Luckily, one B&W artist, legendary film maker John Huston, DID survive into this ridiculous era of colorization and said he chose B&W over color quite intentionally:

"the aesthetic conception which earned John HUSTON his great fame is based on the interplay of black and
white, which enabled him to create an atmosphere according to which he directed the actor and selected
the backdrops; moreover, he expressed himself clearly about his film entitled “The Maltese Falcon” when
stating, “I wanted to shoot it in black and white like a sculptor chooses to work in clay, to pour his work
in bronze, to sculpt in marble”.
... “ASPHALT JUNGLE” was shot in black and white, following a deliberate aesthetic choice,
according to a process which its authors considered best suited to the character of the work."

His heirs sued the colorizers, Turner Brdcst, AND WON.

Fair enough opinion. I think legally, these alterations will be considered separate works – no permission required.
Personally, I'm enjoying the experiment. I don't think there's any pretence of improving the originals here. They are their own thing. And it's non-destructive; the originals will live on. I shoot almost entirely in B/W myself, for the record.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2013 at 19:46 UTC
In reply to:

mzillch: Most of these original artists are long dead and never made any public statements regarding their stand on having their works adulterated. Luckily, one B&W artist, legendary film maker John Huston, DID survive into this ridiculous era of colorization and said he chose B&W over color quite intentionally:

"the aesthetic conception which earned John HUSTON his great fame is based on the interplay of black and
white, which enabled him to create an atmosphere according to which he directed the actor and selected
the backdrops; moreover, he expressed himself clearly about his film entitled “The Maltese Falcon” when
stating, “I wanted to shoot it in black and white like a sculptor chooses to work in clay, to pour his work
in bronze, to sculpt in marble”.
... “ASPHALT JUNGLE” was shot in black and white, following a deliberate aesthetic choice,
according to a process which its authors considered best suited to the character of the work."

His heirs sued the colorizers, Turner Brdcst, AND WON.

Andy Warhol "adulterated" other artists' art, and Jimi Hendrix turned out a glorious, but almost unrecognizable version of "Blue Suede Shoes." Dullaway is not Warhol or Hendrix, but (and because) she's doing her thing.
My book of Dorothea Lange photos, for instance, looks exactly the same to me after viewing these photos. Dullaway's work play's on the originals, obviously, but lives alongside them. Her versions won't survive as long as the originals, and I imagine Dullaway is fine with that.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2013 at 21:07 UTC
In reply to:

JerseyJohn: Ansel Adams wept

Ansel Adams shot roll after roll of Kodachrome as well as black and white. Kodak kept giving it to him, and he loved trying i out. He even shot ad photos for them.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2013 at 21:02 UTC

The craftsmanship is very good here, and I find many of the images quite lovely. Some of them even have a vintage Kodachrome vibe to them.
These will not do anything to diminish the power of the originals, or in any way replace them in the public consciousness, such that it is. I'm quite sure the artist is aware of that. It's just a cool exercise, and everyone is free to look or ignore. I think some of the original artists would have enjoyed these, too.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2013 at 10:36 UTC as 16th comment
In reply to:

fad: Choice theory does not meet the test of reasonableness. People are not clamoring for dpr to do fewer reviews, nor for Canon to make fewer cameras, nor for there to be fewer manufacturers or formats. I could probably take similar street shots with any camera every made (up to a point), but like many others I await the ILC FF mirrorless camera with interest.

My son took me to a store on a block I grew up on that had hundreds of craft beers. We had a very pleasant time, and the people who spent 20 minutes deciding what to buy did not look unhappy, but fulfilled. Our whole economy is based on the individual being free to choose, and to choose responsibly based on self-knowledge.

Of course we're not clamoring for fewer tests. Reading DPR gives us an excuse to stay inside and avoid the hard stuff :)
Interesting point about the beers, though consumables like that aren't necessarily classed the same way in decision theory, because people don't feel "bound" to them. You've had your beers, they were nice, but you can come back later and try a few more. No biggie. It's the way certain things (like cameras) seem to own us that can degrade quality of life. In a perfect consumer society, you would be able to choose among hundreds of cheap cameras one night after the other. Of course, by then we won't need cameras in any recognizable sense of the concept.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 08:21 UTC
In reply to:

fad: Virginia Postrel put it well:

Ultimately, the debate about choice is not about markets but about character. Liberty and responsibility really do go together; it’s not just a platitude. The more freedom we have to control our lives, the more responsibility we have for how they turn out. In a world of constraints, learning to be happy with what you’re given is a virtue. In a world of choices, virtue comes from learning to make commitments without regrets. And commitment, in turn, requires self-confidence and self-knowledge.

“We are free to be the authors of our lives,” says Schwartz, “but we don’t know exactly what kind of lives we want to ‘write.’” Maturity lies in deciding just that.

A very interesting post. I know Postrel is considered a classical liberal, but when she expresses her thoughts on choice, she sounds like an existentialist talking about the big questions. I think part of Kim's point is that agonizing about what should be little things, like which camera to buy, as if if were one of Life's Big Questions makes us miserable. How can it not? So I finally buy that new camera. What have I achieved? Nothing. Now starts the difficult part.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 08:10 UTC
In reply to:

StayClassy: So in other words, it's better to buy a device that you can't return that isn't the most technically able device, than to spend the time to find the most technically able device, and only let your creative ability be the ceiling? Oh, and God forbid that you enter a situation where your camera isn't able to perform (dark environment, combination of fast moving subjects and inadequate lighting, slow AF, etc.), I should just blame myself, instead of accepting that if I chose to be a "maximizer", I'd have equipment that was capable of getting the shot, and that missing it would be my fault?

What.

These photos are lackluster in my eyes, but that's my opinion. Give me an RX100 and I'll mop the floor with this guy.

Pretty much all cameras current enthusiast-oriented today meet the criteria you just listed. So go and invest in an RX100 if that's what you like and you won't have to bother with camera reviews for a few years. You'll be free to photograph :)

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 07:52 UTC
On Just posted: Olympus Body Cap Lens 15mm F8 review article (127 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pangloss: I think the key shortcoming here is the very simple fact that one can take exactly the same pictures with the kit zoom at exactly the same focal length and aperture, adding vignetting and distortion effects in postprocessing if one wishes. So the question is, why spend any money on a body cap lens if one already has a kit zoom that can take exactly the same (or better) picture? As I see it, it is both a waste of money *and* more importantly a waste of shooting opportunities.

…and now PEN FLAT. PEN go in pocket. PEN still take picture. Man happy.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 12, 2013 at 09:29 UTC
On Just posted: Olympus Body Cap Lens 15mm F8 review article (127 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rupert Bottomsworth: It's great to see DPR spending their time reviewing the really important stuff.

I'm a HUGE fan of making the most out of what you have at hand. Gets your creative juices flowing :) I've wanted this lens since it came out, and thanks to this review, I have more to act on. So thanks!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 11, 2013 at 13:00 UTC
In reply to:

whitebird: Um, "carefully selected materials"? White polycarbonate?

FYI: Just joking around

Just joking around maybe. But seriously, someone had to think of it first… Carefully selected doesn't mean it has to be exotic or expensive… just carefully selected. And they thought of it. And the wallets flew open.

Direct link | Posted on May 10, 2013 at 20:33 UTC
In reply to:

gsum: These shots, they are OK but I can't help but think that the real artist is the one that designed the camera. Far more effort, time and thought goes into engineering design than the taking of photos such as these.

Artists are just better at self publicity than great engineers.

Klein worked hard and he was courageous. He went right up to the action, right up to strangers, and came away with wonderful captured moments. Discussions further up the thread get lost in the "is it art" issue, but that's only part of it. A street photographer's hard work and courage shows in what he or she brings back. Most street photography people post online is bland, because it's timid. Safe and lazy. Klein loved the amateur aspect, but these pictures were not taken by an amateur. You don't just show up and "take the photo" -- that should suggest that the majority of online-posted street photography would display the same tension and rawness that you find in photos by the most recognized street shooters. Most people won't ever come close, because they don't come close in investing the time and effort, and in leaving themselves vulnerable on a regular basis. It's got pretty much nothing to do with equipment.

Direct link | Posted on May 2, 2013 at 14:42 UTC
In reply to:

raincoat: If I turned up on a forum with these kinds of photos, would I be hailed as a genius, or booed as a noob who is still using auto mode?

Klein doing blurry misfocused images is acceptable not because blurry misfocused images are acceptable. It's because he's Klein and he's famous, so what he does is acceptable.

You're presupposing that Klein made "techincally acceptable" photos, or whatever you are after, first, and made a name for himself, and then started doing blurry shots and not much bothering with anything, just because he could. First of all, it didn't go down like that. Secondly, it's an absurd thought. Thirdly, what would those "acceptable" pictures look like? Probably like the many thousands you find in online forums, so why bother?

Direct link | Posted on May 2, 2013 at 14:30 UTC
On Roundup: Enthusiast Zoom Compact Cameras article (420 comments in total)
In reply to:

randyckay: The LX7 has also another interesting function worth mentioning: Time lapse.

Ditto for P7700 -- lots of fun :-)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 21, 2012 at 07:55 UTC
On Roundup: Enthusiast Zoom Compact Cameras article (420 comments in total)
In reply to:

iluvmyd800: I recently bought the Nikon 7700, and have been very pleased with how it generally performs, except in low light. But, I did not buy it for that; I bought it for an upcoming trip to Brasil and I am not keen to take my big DSLR and some lenses lest they get stolen! The range on this little camera is remarkable, and it takes brilliant photos in good light. I could not be more pleased. There is a lot of buzz about the Sony RX-100, but I found it to be too small, that it's optical zoom is limited, and that it is slippery in the hand and too expensive for what I wanted. I managed to find my little Nikon for $C450 with tax.

I love the fact that I can put a screw-on filter on the P7700 right out of the box. I've hardly used the lens cap since I got the camera; it's always ready to shoot.
You'd think every manufacturer would want to do this -- it isn't magic.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 21, 2012 at 07:54 UTC
On Nikon CoolPix P7700 Preview preview (192 comments in total)
In reply to:

landscapist: Wait a minute, where's the automatic retracting lens cap?
Seems it's no longer there.

Same here; I just leave the filter on and the cap off. I use a standard 8$ Tiffen, which is no more expensive to replace than a brand-name cap. Thus far, I have no indication of vignetting.
I think the fact that you can attach a standard filter is a pretty important feature. Your optics are protected 100% of the time. I'll leave it up to y'all to decide whether the lens justifies paying for a B+W filter ;)

Direct link | Posted on Oct 26, 2012 at 10:16 UTC
Total: 20, showing: 1 – 20