SirSeth

SirSeth

Lives in United States Hagerstown, United States
Works as a Teacher
Has a website at wallygoots.smugmug.com
Joined on Feb 8, 2004
About me:

My plan is to ever improve my trade, my hobbies, and my relationships with family, friends, and my God. My trade is teaching Math and Computers. My primary hobbies are lutherie (guitar building) and photography. My God is slow to anger and abounding in love. He will not always accuse, nor will he harbor His anger forever; He does not treat us as our sins deserve or repay us for our iniquities. For as high as the heavens are above the earth so great is His love for those who fear him. As far as the east is from the west so far has he removed our transgressions from us. If you have questions or gripes about my God, I always enjoy talking with someone who is a seeker. Rock throwers are rarely convinced of anything spiritual and I can respect their desire to believe differently than myself.

Comments

Total: 299, showing: 61 – 80
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In reply to:

SteB: Olympus are the most innovative of all the Camera manufacturers. Remember live view first appeared on an Olympus camera. Olympus film SLRs had TTL flash metering long before the other manufacturers. When Olympus innovates, all the others soon follow. The original Olympus OM 35mm film SLR was the first compact film SLR, soon all the others followed. They may not have the resources of the bigger manufacturers to sustain their technological leads, but they are always ahead of the curve with innovation.

Who innovates most is such a forum peeing contest. What ever innovation turns out to be golden is good on its own merit however and the Super Sonic Wave Filter that came out in 2004 solved the dust problem conclusively before everyone else really nailed it (or tried to address the issue as the case may be). That was a good innovation. So is 5-axis IS. I'd say that Sony has good sensor innovation and their RX line and "7" line is quite innovative.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 6, 2014 at 15:46 UTC
On Mid-range Mirrorless camera roundup 2013 article (295 comments in total)
In reply to:

Greg Silver: The Sony a6000 is currently the best camera for the money ON THE PLANET!!! No other camera offers the quality and features for that low of price. AND...it competes with the professional level DSLRs very nicely.

I agree. There are a lot of really good deals on very capable cameras right now. The a6000 in mirrorless and the K3 in DSLRs are exceptional values. That D3300 with kit lens and LR5 for $380 is rediculously low too for a first DSLR.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 28, 2014 at 02:58 UTC
On Enthusiast interchangeable lens camera 2013 roundup article (467 comments in total)

I havn't used all these cameras, and I wish I could, but the final selections seem strange. Firstly, no love for the D400? Oh yeah, there isn't one, which means Nikon (and untill recently Canon) have pretty much given this category to Pentax. Canon came close but I think even Canon people recognize that Canon could have made a better APS-C camera if they were not so worried about canibalizing their FF effort. The K3 is such a rediculously great value for it's capabilities right now that I expected an easy honorable mention here. Oh, well, since I haven't used all the cameras, I should just shut my mouth now. Oh, and no mention of the Olympus E-7 either. Crying shame--not DPRs fault. Olympus shouldn't have squandered their wealth in fake aquisitions and fraud.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 28, 2014 at 02:45 UTC as 54th comment | 2 replies
On Real-world test: Going pro with the Samsung NX1 article (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gesture: What do you use to shoot the video?

When DiCaprio sank into the icy abyss in Titanic my eyes were dry, but not now. I hate to see a good camera drowned. Fantastic video though. Great hands-on feedback with a cool location and tons of multi-sensory information.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2014 at 04:21 UTC

Yeah, what's the price because if it's similar to the A7 series this is looking very attractive. The Olympus 5-axis is fantastic and I think it has been shown to be engineered well in the E-M1 so this accomplishment in a small FF body is incredible.

I wonder what Olympus gets out of the deal? FF sensors, 4/3rds sensors, better video specs?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 14:17 UTC as 188th comment | 5 replies

I usually don't like special editions, but this one looks amazing.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2014 at 03:37 UTC as 104th comment
On Olympus OM-D E-M5 rumored to be out of production article (211 comments in total)
In reply to:

white shadow: The EM5 replacement is the EM1. All Olympus need to do is lower the price of the EM1 and make another better camera to replace the EM1. Perhaps, this time they can improve the video capability to 4K if they can. However, I doubt so because Olympus, like Fuji, is not strong in their video technology.

The EM1 is actually quite nice as a micro 4/3 camera but the price is just too high. For almost the same money, one can go for the Canon 7D Mk2 which surpasses it in almost all front.

As for me a micro 4/3 camera should be small. Thus, I would settle for the GM1 to use it for all the situation where a bigger camera is not convenient despite its limitation. For a general use camera, I would go with the 7D Mk2 for speed and versatility and probably a full frame DSLR or medium format like the Pentax 645 for large print image quality.

If $450 difference is almost the the same money (and size, weight, and sensor IS isn't really that important to you), why wouldn't you just get a FF for almost the same money?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 15, 2014 at 23:31 UTC
On Samsung NX1 real-world sample images article (330 comments in total)
In reply to:

Neuroanatomist: as a pro i might stick to canon for a bit longer.
but for average joe customers canon has nothing exciting to offer anymore.

samsung and sony cameras offer something new and great features only a mirrorless can offer.

nikon and canon are dinosaurs.

Exactly AshMills, while the 7Dii is a very good camera, it's pretty easy to see that it's not the best APS-C camera Canon is capable of making in the elapsing years since the 7D came out. Nikon just won't play yet (if ever). Meanwhile they are pushing new FF models out to the market like companies announced point & shoot cameras in 2008.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2014 at 03:19 UTC
In reply to:

SirSeth: The size and projected quality looks very good to me. I will be very curious indeed about the pricing, as it could mean a complete shift for me. No lens that gives 600mm field of view on FF would be close to hand holdable, but this looks like it may be (especially with Oly's excellent 5-axis IS). The wide angle will be great if it's anything like the former 4/3rds 7-14mm. I would think $1500 each would be competitive, but I'm guessing they will be a little higher.

Here's where I think our perspectives really veer away from each other. The FZ200 at ISO100 108mm at f2.8 exposes the same as a D800 at ISO100 with 600mm at f2.8. The depth of field and noise will be different. (And if we go up in the ISOs, then the noise difference will become even more apparent). The light intensity on the sensors is the same and the exposure will be the same. That's why there is an advantage with reach, size, and weight on smaller formats even if there is a noise and DR disadvantage. It sounds very much like you are saying that there is no advantage at all, but sometimes DOF needs to be deeper for telephoto to get the whole subject in focus. Sacrificing a little DOF on the thin side for reach, size, price, and weight puts the advantage squarely with smaller formats.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 6, 2014 at 04:38 UTC
In reply to:

SirSeth: The size and projected quality looks very good to me. I will be very curious indeed about the pricing, as it could mean a complete shift for me. No lens that gives 600mm field of view on FF would be close to hand holdable, but this looks like it may be (especially with Oly's excellent 5-axis IS). The wide angle will be great if it's anything like the former 4/3rds 7-14mm. I would think $1500 each would be competitive, but I'm guessing they will be a little higher.

That doesn't make sense to me. Let me take the sports photographer example and apply a real camera to it. The FZ200 has a 4.5-108mm f2.8 lens and about a 5.5x crop factor. If I apply your reasoning that it acts like a 25-600mm f15.4. Not only would sports photographers not use cameras like that, no one would. The camera simply wouldn't focus at a minimum aperture of f15.4. Shutter speeds would be too long to ever get a picture at 600mm no matter how good the IS was. There are pretty obvious reasons why sports photographers don't use cameras like this: buffer, pro support, MP, compromises of a large zoom lens, AF speed and tracking, dual card support, ISO performance on a smaller sensor... and on and on. But the FZ200 does retain exposure values in keeping with a f2.8 lens at 600mm FOV comparison.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2014 at 13:32 UTC
In reply to:

SirSeth: The size and projected quality looks very good to me. I will be very curious indeed about the pricing, as it could mean a complete shift for me. No lens that gives 600mm field of view on FF would be close to hand holdable, but this looks like it may be (especially with Oly's excellent 5-axis IS). The wide angle will be great if it's anything like the former 4/3rds 7-14mm. I would think $1500 each would be competitive, but I'm guessing they will be a little higher.

I hope others are well entertained and not put off by this discussion. I find it fascinating. Thanks for taking the time to share. Some things I'm still working out in my mind. I get that a 25/1.4 on FF would give the same image as a 50mm f2.8 on FF as far as depth of field and FOV goes. They also would be similar in size. I also see now how it's easier to design a smaller wide angle for mirrorless than a smaller telephoto. But exposure would not be the same between 25/1.4 on 4/3rds and 50/2.8 on FF right? The exposure would be the same at 25/2.8 and 50/2.8 respectively. So isn't that an advantage. While a 300mm f4 does compare to a 600mm f8 for FOV, DOF, and more roughly--lens size, would a 300mm f4 compare to a 600mm f4 as far as FOV and exposure? This would seem like an advantage (when not cropping either format--I realize that both cameras have a crop mode that gives a smaller FOV). Especially at longer focal lengths where we often want great DOF to get the whole subject in focus.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2014 at 02:17 UTC
In reply to:

sneakyracer: With larger sensor mirrorless cameras getting smaller and better, Olympus better up their game or their small sensor cameras will become a tough sell. The magic is in the lenses (also the AF and EVF).

I was talking FOV without cropping. Yes, the Oly has a crop mode too, which reduces the field of view and the subject appears closer. What are you really saying? I know the physical focal length of the Oly lens is 300mm, not 600mm. But the smaller sensor effectively reduced the field of view to get a similar FOV of a 600mm on a FF sensor uncropped. This is why people buy superzoom cameras. In good light, they are really getting reach and the lenses are so small (due to the small sensor) but they allow you apparent closeness to the subject because the FOV is small. This is an advantage and disadvantage (reach is good, but light gathering is less good), but it can't be said, that you can just get a FF camera, mount a nifty 50 and just crop to get "reach" because FOV is what ever you make it.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2014 at 14:14 UTC
In reply to:

SirSeth: The size and projected quality looks very good to me. I will be very curious indeed about the pricing, as it could mean a complete shift for me. No lens that gives 600mm field of view on FF would be close to hand holdable, but this looks like it may be (especially with Oly's excellent 5-axis IS). The wide angle will be great if it's anything like the former 4/3rds 7-14mm. I would think $1500 each would be competitive, but I'm guessing they will be a little higher.

Also, lens design is going to be different when the light is focused closer to the rear element of the lens. This seems consistent with what I see in mirrorless of all brands. For example, Olympus lenses for micro are much smaller and lighter than their counterparts in the 4/3rds lens line for DSLRs.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2014 at 03:44 UTC
In reply to:

SirSeth: The size and projected quality looks very good to me. I will be very curious indeed about the pricing, as it could mean a complete shift for me. No lens that gives 600mm field of view on FF would be close to hand holdable, but this looks like it may be (especially with Oly's excellent 5-axis IS). The wide angle will be great if it's anything like the former 4/3rds 7-14mm. I would think $1500 each would be competitive, but I'm guessing they will be a little higher.

Greetings misolo, I'm interested in your feedback. I see your math is correct. The absolute aperture is the size of the aperture entrance for a specific focal length. So indeed 150/2.8=300/5.6 when it comes to the physical opening (54mm). But that's true regardless of the sensor size? So I don't see how that relates to field of view or exposure. I do see how that relates to depth of field and the size of the hole. Wouldn't the pertinent difference be the size of the light circle falling on the censor. If the light circle doesn't need to be as big because the sensor is smaller, then the lens can be smaller. That's why superzoom cameras are marked with 35mm equiv. focal lengths even when they are not, but the aperture isn't scaled up to be "equivalent." I think we all know that the depth of field won't compare, and the sensor isn't going to gather as much total light input with fewer MP over a smaller area. However, for FOV and exposure 150mm f2.8 on 4/3rds = 300mm f2.8 on FF right?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2014 at 03:38 UTC
In reply to:

sneakyracer: With larger sensor mirrorless cameras getting smaller and better, Olympus better up their game or their small sensor cameras will become a tough sell. The magic is in the lenses (also the AF and EVF).

Yeah, I figured that out too after posting. More pixels means more cropping before an image starts to fall apart. However, we were talking about reach and field of view, not crop potential so his comment threw me a bit. To get 600mm reach on 35mm you need a 600mm lens. On 4/3rds, the same field of view without cropping is achieved with a 300mm lens. Yes, the depth of field will be quite different. Crop potential is also a bonus with a plethora of megapixels, but not all FF cameras has as many as the D800 and 4/3rds is rather small at 16mp.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2014 at 02:20 UTC
In reply to:

SirSeth: The size and projected quality looks very good to me. I will be very curious indeed about the pricing, as it could mean a complete shift for me. No lens that gives 600mm field of view on FF would be close to hand holdable, but this looks like it may be (especially with Oly's excellent 5-axis IS). The wide angle will be great if it's anything like the former 4/3rds 7-14mm. I would think $1500 each would be competitive, but I'm guessing they will be a little higher.

misolo, I think you will indeed be very surprised because your logic is based on Olympus' track record for pro lenses from their legacy DSLR days and the whole point of my comment is completely in the mirrorless realm as it compares to FF DSLR systems. Look at Olympus' track record for mirrorless pro lenses: the 12-40mm f2.8 is the field of view equiv. of the Canon 24-70mm f2.8L (except the Olympus is longer with a 24-80mm field of view). 805g vs. 382g. The closest comparison for the Oly 40-150mm f2.8 may be the Canon 70-200mm f2.8 (except the Oly is 80-300mm FOV equiv). 1490g vs. 880g. And the Oly is currently the longest heaviest mirrorless pro lens made. So, the point isn't that it will be smaller than a Canon 300mm f4 but that it is so much smaller/lighter/cheaper than the FOV equiv. for FF which would be the 600mm f4 at 3920g and $12000. But even then, it can be made smaller and lighter than the 300mm f4 Canon because it's mirrorless.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 3, 2014 at 02:51 UTC
In reply to:

sneakyracer: With larger sensor mirrorless cameras getting smaller and better, Olympus better up their game or their small sensor cameras will become a tough sell. The magic is in the lenses (also the AF and EVF).

Greetings Just, what do you mean you do not need 600mm on FF with the D800 for the same reach? The field of view is double when comparing a FF sensor to 4/3rds. Are you talking about crop mode on the D800? Then you have 16mp APS-Cish performance from a 400mm lens that is roughly the same as the 300mm f4 on m4/3rds. However, 400mm Nikkors are $3000-12,000 and would weight twice to 3x the E-M1 + Zuiko. Also, there are really nice wide angles for micro and the 7-14mm looks very good. The old 4/3rds 7-14mm left nothing to be desired as far as optical quality. Just wondering where you are coming from with your comments because they seem to all but ignore price, size, weight, and comparative IQ of a highly cropped FF image. Of course the E-M1 has a crop mode also giving a narrower angle of view when needed. Not that I am against FF, I'd like one of those too, but the price and size differences for maximum reach are gigantic. That's why many are enthused about longer lenses for mirrorless.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 2, 2014 at 16:17 UTC
In reply to:

SirSeth: The size and projected quality looks very good to me. I will be very curious indeed about the pricing, as it could mean a complete shift for me. No lens that gives 600mm field of view on FF would be close to hand holdable, but this looks like it may be (especially with Oly's excellent 5-axis IS). The wide angle will be great if it's anything like the former 4/3rds 7-14mm. I would think $1500 each would be competitive, but I'm guessing they will be a little higher.

That's nice. Let's look at the Nikon mentioned. The D800 + 80-400mm f4.5-5.6 would cost $5600 and would weight about 80oz. I would like that setup too. However, if the 300mm f4 is about $1500, then the the E-M1 + lens would cost about $2500 and will probably weigh about 48oz. (estimating on a 30 oz. weight for the lens. Body is 18oz.) So about half the weight and $3100 less is a pretty large difference on the cost and hand holding for longer periods side of things. This is precisely why I think that long lenses for micro4/3rds has a good future. Especially as AF is really improving in leaps and bounds. The E-M1 also has a crop function. I was using my MF Tamron SP 300mm f2.8 with crop and getting shots hand held. That's 840mm equivalent in FF speak. Yeah, so light gathering is nice too which is why I'd like to collect the whole set. ;)

Direct link | Posted on Nov 2, 2014 at 16:02 UTC

The size and projected quality looks very good to me. I will be very curious indeed about the pricing, as it could mean a complete shift for me. No lens that gives 600mm field of view on FF would be close to hand holdable, but this looks like it may be (especially with Oly's excellent 5-axis IS). The wide angle will be great if it's anything like the former 4/3rds 7-14mm. I would think $1500 each would be competitive, but I'm guessing they will be a little higher.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 1, 2014 at 22:49 UTC as 69th comment | 22 replies
In reply to:

MPA1: I hope the next iteration of the EM-1 gets much better high ISO performance and two card slots - then I can finally get my DSLR kit sold off.

Just curious, but how "much better high ISO" would you think to be realistic and what DSLR kit are you now using? I used the E-M1 for a month and it's on par with my K5iis for high ISO which is considered very good. The E-M1 is already leagues better than former Olympus DSLRs like my former E-3. But if you are expecting A7s low light capabilities, then dream on. Now two card slots and a battery grip for large capacity batteries I could go for, but I'm not expecting miracles on top of already very competitive high ISO for a crop sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 1, 2014 at 22:40 UTC
Total: 299, showing: 61 – 80
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