SirSeth

SirSeth

Lives in United States Hagerstown, United States
Works as a Teacher
Has a website at wallygoots.smugmug.com
Joined on Feb 8, 2004
About me:

My plan is to ever improve my trade, my hobbies, and my relationships with family, friends, and my God. My trade is teaching Math and Computers. My primary hobbies are lutherie (guitar building) and photography. My God is slow to anger and abounding in love. He will not always accuse, nor will he harbor His anger forever; He does not treat us as our sins deserve or repay us for our iniquities. For as high as the heavens are above the earth so great is His love for those who fear him. As far as the east is from the west so far has he removed our transgressions from us. If you have questions or gripes about my God, I always enjoy talking with someone who is a seeker. Rock throwers are rarely convinced of anything spiritual and I can respect their desire to believe differently than myself.

Comments

Total: 314, showing: 41 – 60
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »

I am interested to see the new lenses side by side with DSLR counterparts. I think it is hard to tell from the picture because the A7 series cameras are just so small that the lenses here tend to dwarf the bodies giving an exaggerated perspective of the relative sizes.

I realize that these lenses are designed for FF and thus I don't expect miracles in size--especially as the focal length increases. The 28mm and 35mm look quite small for their specs. The 90mm macro looks large, but it's a design that I think would be large no matter what format it was made for. I would really really like this lens!

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 13:09 UTC as 81st comment
In reply to:

Vignes: the A7 series needs a bigger grip or a add on grip.

I am pleased that Sony and aftermarket vendors sell vertical grips with 2 battery slots for the A7 series. They do not have to be removed from the camera to recharge batteries which is something that irks me about the Olympus E-M1 grip (keeps one battery in camera and adds one in grip making charging a big pain imo). I also think the deeper hand grip of the A7ii is a plus even though it makes the camera slightly larger. It's still a lot smaller than Nikon or Canon FF when you need it to be.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 13:04 UTC
In reply to:

Linerider: These look like great lenses!!
Now all Sony needs is to make a FF camera with "decent" battery life and im sold

Battery life is an area of improvement for mirrorless for sure. It's not a deal breaker for me, but I am glad that Sony makes a 2 slot battery grip for doubling the capacity on the A7 series. Options are good. But so is power innovation and better battery technology is overdue imo.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 12:57 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (2943 comments in total)
In reply to:

SirSeth: As good as this camera may be for landscape/portrait, I don't think massive resolution with 7Dii DR and 5Dii high ISO is the right balance of priorities. You are welcomed to disagree, but it sounds more like Canon is trying to win a race that finished a few years ago. Megapixels alone isn't a solution now. A balance of enabling technology is. That means not taking steps back in DR, high ISO, and video just for MP alone.

@Neez
Yep. Exactly. Canon _should_ have bothered building on all IQ fronts rather than going super resolution and taking steps back in DR and high ISO. If that's what Nikon is doing then sure--copy them. Could Canon have made a 40mp sensor with better DR and ISO than the current 50mp one? If so, then they should have.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 20:08 UTC
In reply to:

J A C S: Tried it with a few panorama sets, including a Brenizer - stitch lines visible. On the other hand, Hugins did it perfectly but altered the brightness. Too bad because the MS product has a really great UI.

On the Import > Structured Panorama

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 05:28 UTC
In reply to:

J A C S: Tried it with a few panorama sets, including a Brenizer - stitch lines visible. On the other hand, Hugins did it perfectly but altered the brightness. Too bad because the MS product has a really great UI.

I found that playing with the stitch settings could achieve fewer lines then I ever could with Hugin, however, this might be a matter of case by case for certain pictures. It's great to have two super and free tools to throw at different challenging stitches.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 05:14 UTC

Wow! flippin' fantastic! Just created a 111mp portrait (Brenizer) that I couldn't complete in other software.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 03:22 UTC as 30th comment
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (2943 comments in total)
In reply to:

feilong: This camera looks interesting and will be exactly what most people have asked for... I have the 5d III and there is no need for me to use 50mp but this will be a smart move on canons part.

My next camera will be a mirrorless one because I need a lighter alternative to what I am shooting now when I travel with my family.

Unless, like me, you are getting the A7 for sexy legacy lenses like Leica, Rollei, Zeiss, and even FDn, OM, and Rokkor. ;)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 7, 2015 at 00:38 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (2943 comments in total)
In reply to:

SirSeth: As good as this camera may be for landscape/portrait, I don't think massive resolution with 7Dii DR and 5Dii high ISO is the right balance of priorities. You are welcomed to disagree, but it sounds more like Canon is trying to win a race that finished a few years ago. Megapixels alone isn't a solution now. A balance of enabling technology is. That means not taking steps back in DR, high ISO, and video just for MP alone.

Neez, I agree with you in principle, but not in practice. I consider the phrase jack of all trades; master of none sometimes insinuates that being excellent at one thing necessitates being poor at others. This won't fly with things like DR and high ISO at the cost of resolution in a camera costing nearly $4000. This should be an all out tour de force for ultimate image quality. Granted, I think Sony's approach of a 12mp, 24mp, and 36mp A7 line is going for mastery of a particular skill set, but here Canon seems like they are unbalance in their attempt if we are actually stepping back in DR and high ISO to gain the rez.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 7, 2015 at 00:36 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (2943 comments in total)

As good as this camera may be for landscape/portrait, I don't think massive resolution with 7Dii DR and 5Dii high ISO is the right balance of priorities. You are welcomed to disagree, but it sounds more like Canon is trying to win a race that finished a few years ago. Megapixels alone isn't a solution now. A balance of enabling technology is. That means not taking steps back in DR, high ISO, and video just for MP alone.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2015 at 14:31 UTC as 586th comment | 9 replies
On Olympus OM-D E-M5 II First Impressions Review preview (1392 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jurka: Expensive for such small and noisy sensor. Every, even cheapest Canon, has better iso and dr range and details.

Yeah, but buying a Canon would make one a Canon user. :(

Direct link | Posted on Feb 5, 2015 at 14:23 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M5 II First Impressions Review preview (1392 comments in total)

Why do so many of the sample images look fake? Oh... wait... that's Disney, not Olympus. ;)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 5, 2015 at 14:16 UTC as 249th comment

From the peanut gallery I'd say the photographer is a moron for not registering the idea of Jordan jumping. Man could have scored big.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 30, 2015 at 03:13 UTC as 11th comment

Looks like a nice accessory with advantages over bundled flash units or onboard flash. At least it tilt/swivels. I prefer this design to the Olympus FL-300r. Just looks smaller and more versatile as a bounce flash.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 05:17 UTC as 23rd comment
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1457 comments in total)
In reply to:

stern: Since there is so little difference in IQ especially between the best "full frames" and APS-Cs (even FT/MFT have now caught up), I see no need to pay some USD 2000,- for a heavy and bulky "full frame" camera (in the end FF is just the eqivalent to the film-camera-era "small film format", only in a much larger body). I just read a couple of articles comparing the IQ of Nikon FFs and the Pentax K3 (currently the best APS-C on the market): the difference is negligeable. But then again, I have friends who just crave for the biggest optical behemoth they can get hold of...
;-)

I agree with your conclusion about crop vs. FF. In good light at low ISOs, the IQ difference take close critique, but as the light dims APS-C noses ahead of 4/3rds and FF pulls lengths ahead of both. So if weight, size, and cost can be sacrificed, a D810 will easily show it's resolution, low noise, and ISO ability as it gets dark. I would very much like to own an E-M1 + 12-40mm + 40-150mm, an XT-1 + 56mm, A7ii + Zeiss 16-35mm, and D750 + 300mm + 400mm + 600mm. I'd collect the whole set if not for the cost. ;)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 13, 2015 at 03:20 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1457 comments in total)
In reply to:

stern: Since there is so little difference in IQ especially between the best "full frames" and APS-Cs (even FT/MFT have now caught up), I see no need to pay some USD 2000,- for a heavy and bulky "full frame" camera (in the end FF is just the eqivalent to the film-camera-era "small film format", only in a much larger body). I just read a couple of articles comparing the IQ of Nikon FFs and the Pentax K3 (currently the best APS-C on the market): the difference is negligeable. But then again, I have friends who just crave for the biggest optical behemoth they can get hold of...
;-)

I have shot E-M1 for a month and own the K5iis (no AA filter). I agree with Stern that the IQ in almost all respects between the two are negligible. Maybe a slight nod to the Pentax in high ISO. The Olympus has better colors (larger nod). There is much less of a difference between 4/3rd and APS-C than between APS-C and FF. Only if I pixel peep at serious magnification--and even then it's hard to factor out lens differences to see a difference in noise or sharpness. The K3 resolution would help the sharpness probably, but I am looking at 16mp compared with 16mp.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 12, 2015 at 22:22 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1457 comments in total)
In reply to:

stern: Since there is so little difference in IQ especially between the best "full frames" and APS-Cs (even FT/MFT have now caught up), I see no need to pay some USD 2000,- for a heavy and bulky "full frame" camera (in the end FF is just the eqivalent to the film-camera-era "small film format", only in a much larger body). I just read a couple of articles comparing the IQ of Nikon FFs and the Pentax K3 (currently the best APS-C on the market): the difference is negligeable. But then again, I have friends who just crave for the biggest optical behemoth they can get hold of...
;-)

Like you, I have friends who crave the biggest most professional feeling camera they can (or can't) afford. The problem is they have lines of faulty logic to make mountains out of mole hills regarding the superiority of their tiny margins. They also typically completely neglect convenience, budget, and individual priorities when preaching their FF message. It's like word problems in math books that throw out wind resistance, motion, practicality, and application, but are otherwise logically incontestable.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 14:05 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1457 comments in total)
In reply to:

kadardr: Difference between FF and APS-C:
In favor of FF:
One stop better DR. ISO 12800 with FF is fine, ISO 6400 with APS-C can be rescued if you have to.
Less than one stop better color sensitivity/depth.
Better subject isolation (bokeh is function of absolute not relative focal length, absolute and not relative aperture setting and subject distance.
In favor of APS-C: better reach (300mm FF lens = 450mm relative focal length in APS-C). In other words smaller lenses/focal length for the same angle of view.
That is all. FF and APS-C can coexist. A combo of Canon 7DMII/6D or Nikon D400/D750 (just a dream) are very viable options with well selected 5-8 lenses altogether (by combo). These are missing sorely from the article.

Good conclusion, kadardr, and I would say that if the luxery affords to completely separate your systems, going mirrorless and FF would be the best of both worlds. IMO, a D400/D750 would just be good backup, not the most versatile combo. They are just too similar. A Fuji XT-1/D810 or E-M1/D750 would be my dream combos.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 13:55 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1457 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gollan: Wonderful article and great timing. I recently watched a video by Tony Northurp about the issues surrounding the use of full frame lenses on crop bodies. It was very illuminating and convinced me that I really should be looking for lenses that will maximize the potential of my APS-C system instead of favouring lenses that will work well for the "some day" purchase of a full-frame camera. This article reinforces that point and answers the question about how I would eventually make the switch: with both feet! In fact, I'm happy with my current system and it will be a very long time before it presents any serious limitations to my development as a photographer.

I like Tony's videos though I don't always agree. He's a good presenter and pretty realistic.

If the luxury affords, I would say that a move to FF should be with two feet as you say, Gollan, and that in the meanwhile building a complimenting mirrorless system (as Lassoni said, outside of the big two) actually gives the best of both worlds. Canikon has seemed almost scared to jump the rails on their FF runaway train. We'll see if they become serious about mirrorless in the future.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 13:49 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1457 comments in total)
In reply to:

SirSeth: I think the article is well articulated. What I picked up is that many people think that buying FF lenses for a crop sensor will future proof them, but in reality as soon as those lenses are mounted on a FF, you're using "new" lenses that don't behave as they did and may be less useful (or more useful) on the new format. Meaning if you enjoyed the reach, now you need to add reach on the top end...

I think your perspective is exactly what Richard attempted to address. You seem to think that FF (or larger formats) should be everyone's end goal--at least everyone who "is really serious, not wanting to compromise, or professional." Perspective is the Achilles heel of the mind and even more so when privilege is showing.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 13:42 UTC
Total: 314, showing: 41 – 60
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »