mactheweb

Lives in United States Port Townsend, WA, United States
Works as a web design
Joined on Apr 3, 2009
About me:

I love making photos of my town and surrounding area, and find infinite possibilities in the everyday details of life.

Comments

Total: 28, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

electrophoto: that is actually rather impressive... looks to be the first "real" photo editing app on the iPad.
Now if Apple only would lift their silly restrictions on working with real external storage... (and spare me the WiFi / cloud storage options... impossibly slow for a high number of large files.) And exchanging Data between the apps is still a seriously "handicapped" option (creating copies of files through the sandbox stuff).

Especially at the price point for the "pro" pads - handling of storage media & full data exchange is the least I would expect before I'd consider it as a working tool.

You can get a surface 4 for a similar price range (or less) and that thing supports stylus AND mouse / trackpad input... (another thing the iPad should seriously consider adding - mouse support... writing text with the keyboard (I've tried) and stylus is no fun if you have to set the cursor often.

Tablets are only toys because they are crippled by the manufactures. Current generation of iPads have the processing power to do serious photo editing. Apple's iPad pen is a delight to use. It's only Apple's refusal to offer access to the device's file system and to access external physical storage that keep it from being a laptop replacement for many of us. Android tablets have the same limitations.

Pros are not Apple's market, at least not the majority of it. Just as pro cameras make a relatively small percentage of camera maker's market, pros would make a small percentage of tablet markets. It's not just photographers who miss external storage and an accessible file system. Programmers make the same complaints.

As to walking away from a desktop, there are a lot of us who shoot while traveling. A one pound tablet is extremely attractive for that situation. Just because you don't do post on the road doesn't mean that others of us work the same way.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2016 at 14:59 UTC
In reply to:

electrophoto: that is actually rather impressive... looks to be the first "real" photo editing app on the iPad.
Now if Apple only would lift their silly restrictions on working with real external storage... (and spare me the WiFi / cloud storage options... impossibly slow for a high number of large files.) And exchanging Data between the apps is still a seriously "handicapped" option (creating copies of files through the sandbox stuff).

Especially at the price point for the "pro" pads - handling of storage media & full data exchange is the least I would expect before I'd consider it as a working tool.

You can get a surface 4 for a similar price range (or less) and that thing supports stylus AND mouse / trackpad input... (another thing the iPad should seriously consider adding - mouse support... writing text with the keyboard (I've tried) and stylus is no fun if you have to set the cursor often.

You nailed it. The iPad pro has the power to do serious graphic design. The pen is wonderful. There's no latency like Surface Pro or Intuos products. It's the lack of ability to use fast external storage that keeps it from being a viable option.

I tried a Surface Pro. Microsoft just hasn't totally made the OS right for tablets yet. Not quite desktop - not quite tablet, it's a clunky marriage of the two.

The first tablet that gets it all right should be a huge hit with photographers and graphic artists.

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2016 at 02:41 UTC
In reply to:

User3457514510: Is there a filter to screen out the hipster models?

It actually works the other way. It only shoots hipsters.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2016 at 01:43 UTC
In reply to:

The Photo Ninja: For just a little bit more now, you could get an X-E2.

Obviously, Snape you haven't used the Fuji, so your opinion(?) is not informed.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 23:49 UTC
In reply to:

lbpix: To me a camera without a viewfinder is as useful as a car without a steering wheel. However - different strokes for different folks I guess.

I've had the A6000 and still have the X-M1, which is the same as the X-M2 without Wi-Fi. You'd think that the 24mp sensor would give Sony an advantage. With any equivalent lenses, Fuji wins. The X-Trans sensor is better than Sony's 24mp sensors, on any manufacturer's camera for resolution, color, and subtle gradations.

The A6000 is a bargain at current pricing and possibly good as an entry drug into Sony's full frame alphas. It certainly wouldn't be a bad choice.f

As an APS system, Fuji's lens selection wins hands down. They compare favorably with Canon's L glass. Sony has exactly one excellent prime in APSc, but even that isn't quite as good as Fuji's competitor. And the rest of Fuji's lens line is clearly superior to Sony's.

Sony's only system advantages have to do with better video and the same lens mount as the full frame Alpha cameras. The only advantage of the a6000 over the X-M2 is the mediocre viewfinder. It has a worse kit lens, far worse.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 23:47 UTC
In reply to:

nerd2: Nice tablet but simply priced wrong. I need minimum 8GB ram and 256GB storage for any productivity tasks and they charge $300 premium for that? No thanks.

And the surface book costs even more, $1699 for 8GB/256GB configuration... I thought apple pricing was terrible and MS one is worse.

You get a close equivalent to the Wacom's 13 inch Cintique, which is $1300 all by itself.

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2015 at 02:06 UTC
In reply to:

Dirk Nuary: 16GB RAM, really?

This is a graphic pro's computer. That stylus makes this a clear Photoshop choice.

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2015 at 02:04 UTC
In reply to:

photomedium: I actually appreciate very much Sony a7 series vs, for example, the Oly
EM 1 EM 5 EM10 or the fuji XT1 XT10 and all the other docked down model series intended to fill up catalogs and rake in the DPR silver awards. Really an old business model that has no place in the current market IMO.
I think Sony should be the model for all other camera makers to follow: put the best know-how in each camera toward a specific goal and let people pick what they need.

Or you could turn that around. Fuji gives a good camera and continually makes it better. For. No. Extra. Cost. Sony makes you buy a whole new camera.

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2015 at 00:27 UTC
On article Alpha dog: Hands-on with Sony a7R II (1118 comments in total)
In reply to:

MANZURul: Sony A7R II is very good, but missing is the top LCD dispay and built flash like Nikon. With these two features I will buy it

As to missing the top LCD, you gain all that information directly in the EVF, which is visible even in low light. That's a trade I'd make any day.

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2015 at 22:56 UTC
On article Post-Photokina polls - Tell us what you think (198 comments in total)
In reply to:

MrRoger: I do believe Ansel Adams always used large format.

He probably drove a Model T, too. How is this relevant to today's technology?

Link | Posted on Oct 8, 2014 at 22:09 UTC
On article Post-Photokina polls - Tell us what you think (198 comments in total)
In reply to:

gmke: In my silly opinion, who cares, the question is somewhat spare. It makes more sense if you ask, what size sensor would you consider as a minimum for an enthusiast’s only camera, his second camera, or his best camera? The which camera variable changes the answer. Such questions are of limited hypothetical range unless you also consider the availability of funds. If you have to scrape to put $400 together, a few of those 1:1.7 cameras would have to be considered a great treat, and very useful too. For an only camera on limited funds, I wish I could get a 12-megapixel one-inch camera with a fast lens. I think Sony overshot the 20-megapixels. It is a gimmick. Is there a camera that would work for some as the only camera and for others as a second? That market sounds pretty fat, yeah? I would nominate the LX100. I think 1-inch works only when you have another camera with a couple of fast lenses and excellent ISO 3200 performance. That way the fall off the 1600 ISO cliff is not so painful.

Mostly agree. I'm looking at a 1 inch sensor for my backup. The Sonys and the new Canon are pocketable and offer as good a print quality as a DSLR of 7-8 years ago. I don't think the 20 MP is a gimmick. I've printed from a friend's R-X100 II and was impressed with the results at up to 800 ISO. I'd be happy with 6400 ISO for web photos.

For my main camera I'm selling my Nikon D610 and gear for Fuji. As you say, the extra megapixels are, if not a gimmick, not totally relevant either, and I fell in love with the Fuji look. Lenses are great, too.

Link | Posted on Oct 8, 2014 at 22:08 UTC
In reply to:

Realll: I would ask you WHY to buy camera with limited zoom and so small image size (only 12 mp)? The size of the camera is almost same as my Sony a5000 with 16-50, but Sony has big APS-C sensor and 20 mp images... Yes, I know- the glass is important. But amouont of light is approximately equal. So with Sony and 16-50I have same size, same zoom, almost twice bigger images for beautiful crops and I have it on half-price of the LX100... So again WHY ?

We'll have to see how good the lens is. The Sony lens is small but slow and very soft in the corners. I'm judging by my NEX 5N with the collapsible kit lens. The main point for me would be the controls. Not having to did into Sony's less than great menu system is a huge plus.

Link | Posted on Oct 1, 2014 at 17:42 UTC
On article Opinion: Do we really need the Fuji X30? (320 comments in total)
In reply to:

white shadow: This camera is a tough sell. Time will tell.

For simplicity and reasonable performance, I would prefer the Canon S120.

For better image quality, flexibility and ease of carrying around, I would prefer the Lumix GM1.

For best image quality in a small package with excellent user interface and best B&W result, I would prefer the Ricoh GR.

It is best to save the money for more travel opportunity and use whatever camera one is having. Keep the extra to have a few beers while waiting for the right photographic moment.

You nailed it. Three years ago this would have been spectacular. Now the competition has eroded the value of a high priced, bulky, smallish sensor point and shoot.

I'd add the Sony RX-100III to your mix. Bigger sensor and pocketable.

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2014 at 18:39 UTC

I am glad that this is a genuine upgrade and not mostly a fix for an unacknowledged problem as was the D610.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2014 at 22:55 UTC as 31st comment
In reply to:

Gerard Hoffnung: I guess I am in a minority in that I find that very often, I learn something from a comment that I probably wouldn't have learned otherwise. Discussion in comments sections, particularly on very technical issues will either clarify something for me or drive me to further research on the internet. I read at least some of the comments on any article I read and find it easy to skip the nonsense and focus on the good comments. On more than one occasion, some very funny comments have been posted that give me a belly laugh that just makes my day. I'm OK with comment sections.

For me that's the main reason for reading DPreview comments.

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2013 at 19:48 UTC
On article Panasonic GX7 First Impressions Review (1200 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: I suggest you go back and shoot a few very old models as well, such as the D70, 10D, and 5D, so we have some history as well as recent models.

Nice idea. Very time consuming. Just trying to keep up with recent models is tough enough.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2013 at 05:32 UTC
On article Panasonic GX7 First Impressions Review (1200 comments in total)
In reply to:

rfsIII: And for heaven's sake, please, please, please test a couple of medium-format digital cameras, at least a Phase P65+ and a Hasselblad H4D-200MS so that we can have a benchmark from which to judge the other cameras. I'm sure that some kind soul in Seattle will loan them to you, or at least rent them for a day.

Or if you want to text against the camera with the highest DXO score, try the Nikon D800E. Much higher scores than the medium format cameras.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2013 at 05:30 UTC
On article Panasonic GX7 First Impressions Review (1200 comments in total)
In reply to:

bobcn: I like the articulated viewfinder. I'm hoping someone will take the next step -- a removable viewfinder that can be worn or attached to glasses. How convenient would it be to be able to wave a small CSC camera around. Hold it high, low or at arms length pointed around a corner. You'd still be able to set up your shot.

You mean like Google Glasses?

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2013 at 03:22 UTC
Total: 28, showing: 1 – 20
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