E Dinkla

E Dinkla

Lives in Netherlands Netherlands
Works as a Printer
Joined on Mar 30, 2009

Comments

Total: 30, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Top Dog Imaging: If you've ever used a 4-shot Sinar or Hasselblad back, you will be amazed by the difference. The big advantage is no bayer interpolation--much better than a Foveon sensor. My guess is the new sensor will be 20 MPs, hence 40 MP resolution from 8-shots. This may be a game-changer for product, reproduction, and architectural photographers. Furthermore, the capability of mounting an Oly body onto a Cambo Actus opens the system up to infinite possibilities.

Strange that DPreview mentions Hasselblad while Sinar introduced that feature more than a decade ago and made improvements on it since.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2014 at 15:31 UTC
On Portrait Salon 'rejects' exhibition opens in London article (67 comments in total)

The 2013 National Portrait Gallery had a high portion of "Rineke Dijkstra" esthetic content, wonder whether that is also found in the 2014 exhibition. Maybe the first rejected sample shown was on the edge of being accepted then.

Time will tell which art lasts anyway:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salon_des_Refus%C3%A9s

Ernst Dinkla

Direct link | Posted on Nov 7, 2014 at 09:29 UTC as 6th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

pellicle: you know that Canon has plateaued out when you see this sort of release. Great innovation there guys

Ten steps more on the route from Canon to Sony.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 27, 2014 at 10:00 UTC
On Olympus patent describes Google-Glass-like device post (15 comments in total)
In reply to:

Turbguy1: I have been waiting for a wearable viewfinder for a decade! Why not bluetooth it to a "real" cam??

Even asked for it to happen in forums.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 7, 2014 at 09:33 UTC
On Sony Alpha A7 / A7R preview (2372 comments in total)

In FF any chance of a square format option in the EVF and image export? Next firmware upgrade? The round APS one is nice.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2013 at 16:16 UTC as 84th comment
On Roger Cicala investigates accuracy of lens adapters article (48 comments in total)

The method I used is buying inexpensive but rigid adapters and tweak them for one lens so infinity is correct and image quality fall off to the sides is more or less equal. And keep that adapter fixed on that lens. This is not in conflict with Roger's findings. On M4/3 so far and with low weight C-mount lenses so even more within a safety zone. Despite that, two identical lenses gave different results. Most that go this route will use older and often secondhand lenses with different histories. There will always be a lottery aspect in this approach but it can be quite rewarding. Not just in a nice image quality but also to slow down your picture taking and manual focusing, aperture priority shots often deliver my best images.

Ernst Dinkla

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2013 at 09:10 UTC as 9th comment

Why can I not get the same 9.99 Euro deal based on my existing Premium Design CS 5.5 license ? Because Adobe thinks this loyal guy could afford that more expensive package (including Photoshop 5.5, Bridge and more) and its upgrades so we are not going to offer him a deal like that. He has to bleed for going to a Photoshop CC only package or more with Lightroom included or really suffer for a big CC package that does not even contain Lightroom. No way.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 10, 2013 at 12:46 UTC as 47th comment | 1 reply

Harman (Ilford Photo and more) so far made better marketing moves after the split than Ilford Imaging did. This will be another example I expect. A relative small company filling a market niche with their own proven technology and the right brand name to attract customers. Fuji made some new medium format film cameras and has a chromogenic B&W film but it is probably too big for a similar undertaking. Offering the B&W silver halide print service next to the B&W film development rounds it off.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 2, 2013 at 07:55 UTC as 44th comment
On Canon announces PowerShot N Facebook ready edition article (48 comments in total)

No Instagram button?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 23, 2013 at 13:03 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies

Mr Barna sees that the phone replaces the compact camera and generalizes that larger sensors are needed. It may be only true for two segments of the market. Check the medium format market and the sensor sizes there (including the Leica S sensor size) and then count the number of MF backs sold versus 35mm FF sensors. There will be a compression of camera sensor sizes roughly between the 645 size and Micro4/3. Any sensor size smaller will be in a phone, goggles or a watch. It will be difficult to fold the optical path of larger lenses required for larger sensors in phones etc. Bigger cameras that can be used as a phone is not going to happen. The range of film formats was 60x76cm down to less than 1cm square. Sizes shrink in time. It will not be different now, the D800 had an impact on MF backs, the Pentax K5 sensor showed that it did have to be an FF camera for everyone. Grey hair population increases and the eyes age too so more resolution at the same print size is not needed either.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2013 at 14:53 UTC as 59th comment

It would be a nice documentation base for restoration purposes if the art degrades faster than the slides. It is probably cheaper for musea, galleries, collectors to get still existing art documented digitally now when needed than sorting, archiving, searching and digitizing the slides. They do not represent the art in its existing state either.

Ernst Dinkla

Direct link | Posted on Jun 6, 2013 at 10:58 UTC as 17th comment
On DxOMark examines lenses for the Canon EOS 5D Mark III article (60 comments in total)

The score would have been quite different if 4 Sigma macro lenses could have been included for both camera brands. The Sigma 50, 105 and 150 but even more with the 70mm macro lens. Check Colorfoto.de best lens lists for the different cameras.

Ernst Dinkla

Direct link | Posted on Apr 6, 2013 at 11:08 UTC as 14th comment
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

Narcosynthesis: My question is was it ever said that the original run of 20 were the only prints that would be made of this image?

Photography is a medium where images are readily reproducible, and unless it was specifically stated there would be no more made of this image, I would work on the assumption that there may be more made in the future - in a different form if the earlier images were a limited edition (different sizes, finish, process) but still the same picture.

There is a similar case in the Netherlands, the production of an official silkscreen print with queen Beatrix portrayed in a limited and numbered edition, to be used in government buildings. It went wrong as the print run was not big enough to both equip all the buildings and satisfy private collectors. Stupidity exposed there by the organisation that ordered the print. A second print run was needed and the edition collectors went to court. The judge ruled that the second run of the print was allowed if it was used for government buildings only and the prints should be destroyed as soon as the queen would no longer be in office. Here social interest prevailed above the interests of the buyers but the limited edition principle was respected. The queen abdicates at the end of this month and I wonder whether this dictate is followed to the letter ... if there are not already collectors that got access to prints from that second run when buildings were abandoned over the last 32 years ...

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 12:37 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

Narcosynthesis: My question is was it ever said that the original run of 20 were the only prints that would be made of this image?

Photography is a medium where images are readily reproducible, and unless it was specifically stated there would be no more made of this image, I would work on the assumption that there may be more made in the future - in a different form if the earlier images were a limited edition (different sizes, finish, process) but still the same picture.

There is a similar case in the Netherlands, the production of an official silkscreen print with queen Beatrix portrayed in a limited and numbered edition, to be used in government buildings. It went wrong as the print run was not big enough to both equip all the buildings and satisfy private collectors. Stupidity exposed there by the organisation that ordered the print. A second print run was needed and the edition collectors went to court. The judge ruled that the second run of the print was allowed if it was used for government buildings only and the prints should be destroyed as soon as the queen would no longer be in office. Here social interest prevailed above the interests of the buyers but the limited edition principle was respected. The queen abdicates at the end of this month and I wonder whether this dictate is followed to the letter .... if there are not already collectors that got access to prints from that second run when buildings were abandoned over the last 32 years ...

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 12:36 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

E Dinkla: For photography and the photographer the marketing model of a limited edition is not fitting well. Not in a technical, commercial or artistic sense. There could be another approach where the edition of one image is unlimited, the technical expression of the image not limited to the properties of the first print made and size not fixed either. To keep the collectors aboard the pricing of the first ten prints can be kept low for early adopters and with every new run of ten the price at least triples or go for the market price if that one is higher etc. Size and print technology price added on top of that. Numbering on the print running up from the very first print though.That way both (early) collectors and the photographer can gain from the kind of speculation in the market that usually only creates money for the collectors and auction houses. This scheme suits new artists too.

Addition: Depending on demand in the market some images will sell in larger editions and reach a higher price per piece, other images simply not. The variety in sizes and expression of the image will still influence prices of individual prints on the long run so collectors can be happy and boast about their taste too if they made the lucky choices. It is up to the photographer to be transparent about this marketing scheme from the start and apply it consistently from then on.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 08:02 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)

For photography and the photographer the marketing model of a limited edition is not fitting well. Not in a technical, commercial or artistic sense. There could be another approach where the edition of one image is unlimited, the technical expression of the image not limited to the properties of the first print made and size not fixed either. To keep the collectors aboard the pricing of the first ten prints can be kept low for early adopters and with every new run of ten the price at least triples or go for the market price if that one is higher etc. Size and print technology price added on top of that. Numbering on the print running up from the very first print though.That way both (early) collectors and the photographer can gain from the kind of speculation in the market that usually only creates money for the collectors and auction houses. This scheme suits new artists too.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 08:02 UTC as 63rd comment | 1 reply
On Confessions of a camera snob post (90 comments in total)
In reply to:

jimjim2111: Does the square format only use 3/4 of the sensor?

Looks like that considering the light fall off in the samples. And that 3:3 format is not from the center or the shown asymmetric light fall off is another creative filter used. The best part of the article is the praised square format, there is market niche for a high end digital camera with a square format. Preferably based on M4/3 technology but with a 20x20 mm sensor with a choice of aspect ratios including square.

Ernst

Direct link | Posted on Mar 15, 2013 at 11:46 UTC
On Online images and copyright infringement article (255 comments in total)
In reply to:

E Dinkla: It would be a very smart move if any copyright infringement is compensated by a donation for a good cause. The price to pay can be several times the normal photographer's image price and still hold in court. Greed is not an issue then and the level of shame is multiplied for the company that is not willing to cooperate.

I did not write that there was greed in both cases mentioned in the article. I wrote that greed can not be an issue in the charity route.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2013 at 16:37 UTC
On Online images and copyright infringement article (255 comments in total)
In reply to:

E Dinkla: It would be a very smart move if any copyright infringement is compensated by a donation for a good cause. The price to pay can be several times the normal photographer's image price and still hold in court. Greed is not an issue then and the level of shame is multiplied for the company that is not willing to cooperate.

To charity five to ten times the price I would ask if the work was ordered in a normal way? Yes, if that penalty made them and others aware that a price has to be paid for a theft like that. I would also insist on a less hypocritical statement by the offender that goes along with the gift to charity.
Would you prefer to go the other route and get less yourself + handing over a substantial amount to the lawyer + all the hassle of that route? So far it looks like the risk of a court case is not considered high enough to make copyright infringement a rare case. The approach is that most will not claim due to this long winding path of justice done. They settle for the normal price or nothing at all. The institutes you can join to protect your interests, that also should check abuse of your images, do not have a positive imago either. They are in it for the money too in practice. At least that is what I hear pros complain about. Your challenge fund would get a similar structure fast.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2013 at 16:33 UTC
On Online images and copyright infringement article (255 comments in total)

It would be a very smart move if any copyright infringement is compensated by a donation for a good cause. The price to pay can be several times the normal photographer's image price and still hold in court. Greed is not an issue then and the level of shame is multiplied for the company that is not willing to cooperate.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 8, 2013 at 09:52 UTC as 11th comment | 4 replies
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