Malikknows

Malikknows

Joined on Jan 14, 2012

Comments

Total: 16, showing: 1 – 16
On Travel tripods: 5 carbon fiber kits reviewed article (81 comments in total)

Great review, thanks DPR. Question: I would find it useful to be able to add my tripod to my gear list. Is it too expensive to add these sorts of accessories?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 28, 2014 at 15:56 UTC as 17th comment
On Travel tripods: 5 carbon fiber kits reviewed article (81 comments in total)
In reply to:

David Hurt: $800.00 for a tripod??? You are kidding me. Never!

$600 is not too much to support $5,000 in camera gear, methinks. Key is that the tripod will last for years, unlike most of my other camera equipment. I figured, heck, I'll spend the money now, enjoy a first-class piece of equipment and never feel the need to update. I've had the Gitzo Traveler for more than a year and love it. Anyway, I see that it is an expensive piece of kit and others may not value it as I do. I do lots of travel and I do appreciate saving every ounce when I can.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 28, 2014 at 15:40 UTC
On Travel tripods: Comparing 5 aluminum kits article (109 comments in total)
In reply to:

Malikknows: Great and useful story, I just wish they had reviewed Gitzo. They've been leaders in the travel tripod segment for quite some time. I love mine.

Thanks, Mark! Yes, indeed, I have the Gitzo Series 1 in carbon fiber. Crazy expensive but I thought I'd buy a good one and then not have to upgrade. It hasn't let me down. In any event, appreciate the response!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 21, 2014 at 19:32 UTC
On Travel tripods: Comparing 5 aluminum kits article (109 comments in total)

Great and useful story, I just wish they had reviewed Gitzo. They've been leaders in the travel tripod segment for quite some time. I love mine.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 21, 2014 at 13:29 UTC as 24th comment | 2 replies

I enjoy these stories. Cameras are artifacts with their own extraordinary histories to tell. Thanks, DPR.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 19:21 UTC as 39th comment | 1 reply
On Rare photos of Nagasaki destruction auctioned article (109 comments in total)
In reply to:

Johannes Zander: Act of Genocide!
Oh now, since it was the US it must be an humanitarian act of libaration in the name of freedom.

I think Germans should shut up -- permanently-- on the subjects of genocide and atrocity, notwithstanding their demonstrated talent for them.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 6, 2014 at 12:41 UTC
In reply to:

munro harrap: In case you wombles do not know, photographer is the no 1 most dangerous profession. The percentage killed relative to the total number makes it so.It is an occupational hazard, and everyone who goes unarmed into a war to record it knows this. No ideology is involved, no politics are needed to cloak mass murder, but unfortunately her generation were inspired by a few in mine who fancied what they did made a difference.

Recording conflicts we in the West started ourselves was a futile irony that just never occurred to them strongly enough to keep them at home safe with their terrified stressed families and friends.

How many more?

You had time to make an idiotic, off-topic PC response to my post. You truly should find time to get your facts straight before inserting yourself into an issue of which you obviously have no knowledge or insight. People who cannot assign moral responsibility for a discrete events like 9/11 really should take their own advice and avoid "complex" topics.

Direct link | Posted on May 28, 2014 at 06:16 UTC
In reply to:

munro harrap: In case you wombles do not know, photographer is the no 1 most dangerous profession. The percentage killed relative to the total number makes it so.It is an occupational hazard, and everyone who goes unarmed into a war to record it knows this. No ideology is involved, no politics are needed to cloak mass murder, but unfortunately her generation were inspired by a few in mine who fancied what they did made a difference.

Recording conflicts we in the West started ourselves was a futile irony that just never occurred to them strongly enough to keep them at home safe with their terrified stressed families and friends.

How many more?

Wow, PC you indeed are. A few inconvenient facts for you: The US didn't invade Saudi Arabia because its government cooperated with the US, unlike the Taliban. It is that simple. And I see you couldn't resist including Iraq, which has no relevance to Afghanistan whatsoever but is a meme for those prone to anti-Western propaganda who just can't help themselves.

I find it funny that Westerners like to lecture me about my own culture and my own religion and even my own history. Funny that. My question is: why all the self-hate? Can't you make an argument for Australia and its allies? Do you really believe the West is morally equivalent to the Taliban? Oh, by the way, it would be truly hard for the US to have "had its fingers in the ME...[for] millennia" as those nations have not existed that long. But that kind of hyperbole just shows your bias.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2014 at 15:08 UTC
On Street photography tips with Zack Arias article (151 comments in total)
In reply to:

LadyGaGa: Oh yeah Arias is a Fuji whore.

He's a working professional. Making a buck. Good for him.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2014 at 06:45 UTC
In reply to:

munro harrap: In case you wombles do not know, photographer is the no 1 most dangerous profession. The percentage killed relative to the total number makes it so.It is an occupational hazard, and everyone who goes unarmed into a war to record it knows this. No ideology is involved, no politics are needed to cloak mass murder, but unfortunately her generation were inspired by a few in mine who fancied what they did made a difference.

Recording conflicts we in the West started ourselves was a futile irony that just never occurred to them strongly enough to keep them at home safe with their terrified stressed families and friends.

How many more?

This is not helpful, and not even true. Very PC view of history where moral responsibility is amorphous, not definable or assignable. Sorry, but the truth of the matter is quite clear and not at all grey. I'm quite sure the Taliban are Afghanis. I'm quite sure they allowed terrorist training camps with full knowledge of what they would be used for. I'm quite sure the Taliban are Islamic fundamentalists who cooperated with like-minded fundamentalists, and are doing so today. And I'm quite sure they would slit your throat if given the chance.

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2014 at 06:27 UTC
On Leica T (Typ 701) First Impressions Review preview (2298 comments in total)

The design of this camera tells me Leica does not understand why its M is so revered. If I want modern design, I'll go to Sony or Panasonic. If I want classic design, it would have been nice had Fuji been joined by Leica. Pity.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 24, 2014 at 18:45 UTC as 557th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

munro harrap: In case you wombles do not know, photographer is the no 1 most dangerous profession. The percentage killed relative to the total number makes it so.It is an occupational hazard, and everyone who goes unarmed into a war to record it knows this. No ideology is involved, no politics are needed to cloak mass murder, but unfortunately her generation were inspired by a few in mine who fancied what they did made a difference.

Recording conflicts we in the West started ourselves was a futile irony that just never occurred to them strongly enough to keep them at home safe with their terrified stressed families and friends.

How many more?

"conflicts we in the West started"? Afghanistan? Really? The terrorists who killed 3,000 innocents on 9/11 was the start, I'm quite sure.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2014 at 18:12 UTC
On Olympus PEN E-P5 Preview preview (380 comments in total)
In reply to:

decodeddreams: Anyone have any thoughts or guesses on how this camera will fair compared to the Fuji x100s?

X100s not a fair comparison, I agree. But the Fuji XE-1 is closer. Larger sensor and built in VF, with only a slightly larger, but lighter body. I also prefer setting shutter speed with a dial. Glad to see Oly is competing in this segment, though.

Direct link | Posted on May 28, 2013 at 14:13 UTC
On A Serious Rangefinder Compact Camera article (137 comments in total)

Looks closest to the current Fuji XPro1.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 19, 2012 at 23:32 UTC as 97th comment
In reply to:

Malikknows: I've been lurking here now for several weeks, trying to decide to buy an X10 or X100 (or an X1Pro to replace my old Contax G2!), and have appreciated the discussion. I'm the rankest amateur and see the merit of both critics and advocates. Certainly the orbs are both real and unacceptable and need to be remedied. Even I can see that. Very disappointing that this firmware fix failed to do so. But I also see that Fuji is trying hard to innovate, and bring new technologies to the market very, very rapidly. The pace of technological change is quite breathtaking! They are clearly listening to their customers but struggling to execute. I have to side with a company that's investing, researching and trying to innovate. Perhaps I'm too easily pleased, but I look on the X-line of products, faults and all, with wonder and great anticipation. We are right to point out flaws and demand perfection, but I guess I'd like to see more charity and appreciation for the difficulty of the task.

Definitely. Waiting for the X1Pro. Money's tight right now but I need a smaller travel camera when the Canon DSLR is too big and cumbersome.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2012 at 12:40 UTC

I've been lurking here now for several weeks, trying to decide to buy an X10 or X100 (or an X1Pro to replace my old Contax G2!), and have appreciated the discussion. I'm the rankest amateur and see the merit of both critics and advocates. Certainly the orbs are both real and unacceptable and need to be remedied. Even I can see that. Very disappointing that this firmware fix failed to do so. But I also see that Fuji is trying hard to innovate, and bring new technologies to the market very, very rapidly. The pace of technological change is quite breathtaking! They are clearly listening to their customers but struggling to execute. I have to side with a company that's investing, researching and trying to innovate. Perhaps I'm too easily pleased, but I look on the X-line of products, faults and all, with wonder and great anticipation. We are right to point out flaws and demand perfection, but I guess I'd like to see more charity and appreciation for the difficulty of the task.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2012 at 11:21 UTC as 149th comment | 8 replies
Total: 16, showing: 1 – 16