PIX 2015
PerL

PerL

Lives in Sweden Sweden
Works as a Design & layout
Joined on Nov 25, 2002

Comments

Total: 219, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

PerL: Personally I doubt that new Sony AF-C system matches even 5 years old prosumer DSLR-technology for true action shooting. I wrote this post about real world-testing results, which generated very little interest.
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/56316733
Since DPReview seems very ambitious in researching the AF-C capabilities (and seems very impressed) with the new Sony, it would be interesting to see a similar test.
(I know this article is about low light AF-C, but the above would be the next step in evaluation the AF-C)

JF69
No, it is because when DOF is deep in an AF-test (or the target moves sideways but in the same focal plane), the AF is not challenged, so it is not much of a test.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2015 at 09:33 UTC
In reply to:

PerL: Personally I doubt that new Sony AF-C system matches even 5 years old prosumer DSLR-technology for true action shooting. I wrote this post about real world-testing results, which generated very little interest.
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/56316733
Since DPReview seems very ambitious in researching the AF-C capabilities (and seems very impressed) with the new Sony, it would be interesting to see a similar test.
(I know this article is about low light AF-C, but the above would be the next step in evaluation the AF-C)

@Rishi,
I am glad to hear that.
Some things to keep in mind:
1. Shallow DOF, use the typical lenses used for this, like 70-200 2.8s that are designed for fast focusing.
2. Avoid bright contrasty conditions.
3. Shot also indoor sports.
4. Shot also sports that are unpredictable with erratic movements.
Why not work with a sports pro that get access to real games and can switch between the systems.
5. Also judge the viewfinder behavior (lag, slide show effect etc)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2015 at 07:00 UTC
In reply to:

PerL: Personally I doubt that new Sony AF-C system matches even 5 years old prosumer DSLR-technology for true action shooting. I wrote this post about real world-testing results, which generated very little interest.
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/56316733
Since DPReview seems very ambitious in researching the AF-C capabilities (and seems very impressed) with the new Sony, it would be interesting to see a similar test.
(I know this article is about low light AF-C, but the above would be the next step in evaluation the AF-C)

EthanP99,
Yes, I have seen that. Its a typical example of subpar-testing (no DOF challenge).

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2015 at 06:49 UTC

Personally I doubt that new Sony AF-C system matches even 5 years old prosumer DSLR-technology for true action shooting. I wrote this post about real world-testing results, which generated very little interest.
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/56316733
Since DPReview seems very ambitious in researching the AF-C capabilities (and seems very impressed) with the new Sony, it would be interesting to see a similar test.
(I know this article is about low light AF-C, but the above would be the next step in evaluation the AF-C)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2015 at 06:20 UTC as 104th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

dwill23: "This lens also features Nikon’s Electromagnetic Aperture for consistent exposures" Ohhh something Canon has done since 1987 with ALL their lenses, while Nikon bashed them, Nikon first copied IS, then motors in the lens "VR" now electromagnetic apertures. Dang. Better hope Sony doesn't pull those fantastic sensors away.....or start selling them to Canon. Read the lens reviews on this site, most Canon's are better. This lens is a joke, F5.6? Well, I guess if it's $500 it would be worth only using it in sun or bright cloudy days.

5.6 on a 200-500 mm lens is joke? Is the 100-400 5.6 Canon also a joke?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 4, 2015 at 14:41 UTC
On Sony: An eye on focus article (763 comments in total)
In reply to:

PerL: So would this system enable Sony cameras to shot a low light indoor sports game with a 200 2.0 lens wide open at 10 fps with a higher number of keepers than a Canon 1Dx or a Nikon D4s, or is it just nerd stuff?

@ttran88
I think you are to emotionally invested. It is just about cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 4, 2015 at 16:42 UTC
On Sony: An eye on focus article (763 comments in total)
In reply to:

PerL: So would this system enable Sony cameras to shot a low light indoor sports game with a 200 2.0 lens wide open at 10 fps with a higher number of keepers than a Canon 1Dx or a Nikon D4s, or is it just nerd stuff?

@Celsus,
OK "nerd stuff" was a little harsh, but on average it seems like there is an article a week about some new fantastic AF-technology from Fuji, Sony, Panasonic, Olympus etc to overcome the problems with sensor based AF-C. There has been so much hype so I have become a little cynical.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 4, 2015 at 14:14 UTC
On Sony: An eye on focus article (763 comments in total)
In reply to:

PerL: So would this system enable Sony cameras to shot a low light indoor sports game with a 200 2.0 lens wide open at 10 fps with a higher number of keepers than a Canon 1Dx or a Nikon D4s, or is it just nerd stuff?

@all,
The tone of the article is that this is a game changer, so I was asking if it truly is a game changer – will it be a reason for those depending on AF, like sports pros, to switch? Apparently not.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 3, 2015 at 23:33 UTC
On Sony: An eye on focus article (763 comments in total)
In reply to:

PerL: So would this system enable Sony cameras to shot a low light indoor sports game with a 200 2.0 lens wide open at 10 fps with a higher number of keepers than a Canon 1Dx or a Nikon D4s, or is it just nerd stuff?

Well, I have to interpret the answers so far that there is no improvement for those really needing AF-performance. So I must conclude it is mostly nerd stuff.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 3, 2015 at 00:56 UTC
On Sony: An eye on focus article (763 comments in total)
In reply to:

PerL: So would this system enable Sony cameras to shot a low light indoor sports game with a 200 2.0 lens wide open at 10 fps with a higher number of keepers than a Canon 1Dx or a Nikon D4s, or is it just nerd stuff?

@Celsus
I am talking about those who really needs high performance AF. Working professionals shooting sports and action and news in any light. For the rest of us the question is mostly academical. Unless of course you have a lot of AF-problems, but I really doubt that is a great worry for the majority, at least those using DSLRs. Early mirrorless with slow CDAF could be another story. But even those are better now, I understand.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 3, 2015 at 00:48 UTC
On Sony: An eye on focus article (763 comments in total)

So would this system enable Sony cameras to shot a low light indoor sports game with a 200 2.0 lens wide open at 10 fps with a higher number of keepers than a Canon 1Dx or a Nikon D4s, or is it just nerd stuff?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 3, 2015 at 00:12 UTC as 75th comment | 27 replies
In reply to:

PerL: There seems to be a lot of excitement on the mirrorless forums about red dot sights, bypassing the EVF altogether for tracking action. That tells me that EVFs still lags OVFs in speed, by an amount enough to be an issue.

@Fri13
Blackout time is longer than with mirror flap on a high end DSLR.
The lag of EVFs is influenced by the processing going on.
About EVF lag:
From Imaging Resource shooters report of Samsung NX1:
"in sports photography, where a hundredth of a second can make a difference, that short delay can cause you to completely lose track of the action -- by the time you're done firing off your burst, your subject matter might be completely out of frame, as was the case for me a few times in both hockey and volleyball.

If anything about the camera turned me off on using this as my full-time sports camera, this is it. I tried varying the burst rate between the full 15fps down to 8fps in Continuous High mode, and while there's some improvement in this EVF "lag" at a slower burst rate, it wasn't a significant improvement, I found. It's but one major flaw, but in the demanding world of sports photography, it's a big one that can make or break whether you get the shot you need."

Direct link | Posted on Jun 21, 2015 at 16:42 UTC
In reply to:

PerL: There seems to be a lot of excitement on the mirrorless forums about red dot sights, bypassing the EVF altogether for tracking action. That tells me that EVFs still lags OVFs in speed, by an amount enough to be an issue.

@Eric Nepean
The quote is from the m43 forum where they discussed how a red dot sight was a way to get around the problems with long blackouts at medium fps and AF-C or no live view when shooting at full fps and AF-C. So I concluded in my first comment here that EVFs lags OVFs in this regard.
Yes, I understand the principle of the wider FOV of red dot sights, but that is another question.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 21, 2015 at 00:02 UTC
In reply to:

PerL: There seems to be a lot of excitement on the mirrorless forums about red dot sights, bypassing the EVF altogether for tracking action. That tells me that EVFs still lags OVFs in speed, by an amount enough to be an issue.

@all:
So how should one interpret this quote:
"Well, as long as your subjectsare movubng relatively consistently in one directions, the dot sight arguably won't give you any advantage. Other than with my E-M1 that is hampered either by blackout phases (C-AF up to 6.5 FPS) or lack of liveview (C-AF up to 10 FPS)."

Direct link | Posted on Jun 20, 2015 at 16:52 UTC
In reply to:

PerL: There seems to be a lot of excitement on the mirrorless forums about red dot sights, bypassing the EVF altogether for tracking action. That tells me that EVFs still lags OVFs in speed, by an amount enough to be an issue.

@Thorgrem,
I am sure it has to do with EVF-problems, judging by the comments about it on the forums.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 20, 2015 at 09:51 UTC

There seems to be a lot of excitement on the mirrorless forums about red dot sights, bypassing the EVF altogether for tracking action. That tells me that EVFs still lags OVFs in speed, by an amount enough to be an issue.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 20, 2015 at 09:10 UTC as 71st comment | 13 replies
On Nikon D7200 Review preview (573 comments in total)
In reply to:

PerL: Why not mention the OVF as a great pro for action shooting - totally stable, lag free, no jerking, no distractions by limited DR or exposure changes, easy on the eyes for long shooting sessions. Always on for fast reaction to sudden photo opportunities. This is a major difference and a main reason for choosing a D7200 over mirrorless alternatives.

Azurael,
The reviewer compares several aspects vs mirrorless cameras. But not this main point. I am not sure everyone is aware why many high end users prefers OVFs for some types of demanding shooting. Never mind if it is mentioned as a "pro" (although it is for action shooting) but a least a discussion about it should have a place in the review.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 5, 2015 at 20:02 UTC
On Nikon D7200 Review preview (573 comments in total)

What I miss in the review:
1. Reasons for choosing an OVF DSLR (I discussed it in an earlier comment)
2. System. Surely the largest lens and body (FF-cameras with the same mount) system together with Canon is a plus point?
Many mentioned the Samsung NX1 which scores higher. What about the Samsung system vs the Nikon system?
This is a camera with a potential as prosumer action/wildlife camera with options in high end fast lenses that only Canon can match. No, its not a compact travel camera, or a video optimized camera and it is heavier to carry than lighter cameras. But it has other strengths, I am not sure the review points them out properly.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 14:55 UTC as 72nd comment
On Nikon D7200 Review preview (573 comments in total)
In reply to:

PerL: Why not mention the OVF as a great pro for action shooting - totally stable, lag free, no jerking, no distractions by limited DR or exposure changes, easy on the eyes for long shooting sessions. Always on for fast reaction to sudden photo opportunities. This is a major difference and a main reason for choosing a D7200 over mirrorless alternatives.

@Azurael
I think the advantages of OVFs should be mentioned or at least be discussed in the review, since those are key reasons why many would choose a D7200 - which after all is the camera this review is about.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 14:03 UTC
On Nikon D7200 Review preview (573 comments in total)
In reply to:

PerL: Why not mention the OVF as a great pro for action shooting - totally stable, lag free, no jerking, no distractions by limited DR or exposure changes, easy on the eyes for long shooting sessions. Always on for fast reaction to sudden photo opportunities. This is a major difference and a main reason for choosing a D7200 over mirrorless alternatives.

@Zeisschen:
From Imaging Resource shooters report of Samsung NX1:
"in sports photography, where a hundredth of a second can make a difference, that short delay can cause you to completely lose track of the action -- by the time you're done firing off your burst, your subject matter might be completely out of frame, as was the case for me a few times in both hockey and volleyball.

If anything about the camera turned me off on using this as my full-time sports camera, this is it. I tried varying the burst rate between the full 15fps down to 8fps in Continuous High mode, and while there's some improvement in this EVF "lag" at a slower burst rate, it wasn't a significant improvement, I found. I also didn't notice a change in this behavior between varying light quality, both low-light and bright. It's but one major flaw, but in the demanding world of sports photography, it's a big one that can make or break whether you get the shot you need."

Direct link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 12:10 UTC
Total: 219, showing: 1 – 20
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