Guy Swarbrick

Guy Swarbrick

Lives in United Kingdom Berkshire, United Kingdom
Works as a Sports Photographer
Has a website at http://www.guyswarbrick.com/
Joined on Jan 6, 2005
About me:

Covering cycle sport since 2003. Went to my first track Worlds in 2008 and haven't missed one since.
Manchester 2008, Pruszkow 2009, Ballerup 2010, Apeldoorn 2011, Melbourne 2012, Minsk 2013, Cali 2014
First multisports event - Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games
Clients include Belgian Cycling Hall of Fame, BikeNZ, British Cycling, Cycling Australia, Cycling Ireland, Cycling News, Cycling Weekly, Inpho, Malaysian Cycling Federation, Roadcycling.co.nz, Roadcycling.co.uk, Swiss Cycling

Comments

Total: 129, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

RichRMA: Responses and translations.
"I hate it!" (I can't afford it.)
"It's gaudy!" (I can't afford it)
"It's no good, the Sony X100 is so much better!" (derangement)
"They should release a new camera instead!" (even though I have no intention of buying either).

I can afford it; it's gaudy; I hate it.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2014 at 09:50 UTC

For Lexus owners everywhere...

Well, I say 'everywhere'... I mean 'in the US'.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2014 at 09:18 UTC as 74th comment
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

tbcass: Shooting bicycles, field Hockey and Track and Field is easy compared to Basketball where there is constant change of direction and people moving in and out of the scene. I've shot Baseball, Soccer, Lacrosse, bicycles, Hockey and Basketball. I find Basketball the hardest by far.

And a superb AF system would lock on the face and hold it. The D4S does; the D4 doesn't do nearly so well; the D810 is somewhere in between.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 29, 2014 at 18:55 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

tbcass: Shooting bicycles, field Hockey and Track and Field is easy compared to Basketball where there is constant change of direction and people moving in and out of the scene. I've shot Baseball, Soccer, Lacrosse, bicycles, Hockey and Basketball. I find Basketball the hardest by far.

You've not shot a lot of cycling, have you? There are all sorts of reasons why it's difficult for an AF system to cope well with it, but the most significant is the depth of the target. Unlike a field sports player, a cyclist has a bicycle which sticks out a couple of feet ahead of them, the furthest forward part of which they hold on to. In very, very good light it's all within the depth of field, so if the AF grabs at an arm or a handlebar stem it doesn't matter too much. Indoors it matters enormously.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 27, 2014 at 00:36 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

tbcass: Shooting bicycles, field Hockey and Track and Field is easy compared to Basketball where there is constant change of direction and people moving in and out of the scene. I've shot Baseball, Soccer, Lacrosse, bicycles, Hockey and Basketball. I find Basketball the hardest by far.

If there had been any basketball at the Commonwealth Games I could have gone. As there wasn't...

Direct link | Posted on Sep 11, 2014 at 20:23 UTC
In reply to:

Guy Swarbrick: Why not just put an OTG port on it, then you could just plug a card reader in...?

Brain-fade... I meant SD-only...

Direct link | Posted on Sep 9, 2014 at 08:41 UTC
In reply to:

Guy Swarbrick: Why not just put an OTG port on it, then you could just plug a card reader in...?

I had an earlier Nexto DI product and it was very good. Unfortunately, the internal battery exploded and killed it. There are a number of CF/WiFi solutions out there, but the WD one is much cheaper if you can cope with WiFi only. I may get the WD one for the Fujis...

Direct link | Posted on Sep 8, 2014 at 22:17 UTC
In reply to:

Guy Swarbrick: Why not just put an OTG port on it, then you could just plug a card reader in...?

http://cvp.com/index.php?t=product/nexto_nd-2901-1tbhdd

Direct link | Posted on Sep 6, 2014 at 21:11 UTC
In reply to:

Guy Swarbrick: Why not just put an OTG port on it, then you could just plug a card reader in...?

You can buy it with or without. Without allows you to source the size you want at the best price; your choice.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 6, 2014 at 11:10 UTC
In reply to:

Guy Swarbrick: Why not just put an OTG port on it, then you could just plug a card reader in...?

And, wireless aside, Nexto have done this, better, for 10 years...

http://cvp.com/index.php?t=product/nexto_nd-2901&gclid=Cj0KEQjw4aqgBRCvwLDi_8Tc54YBEiQAs6DLvP6fOEGIEzaEyH1y32bDOiNOt7t5jImfm5B6B-xuk5gaAtFR8P8HAQ

Direct link | Posted on Sep 6, 2014 at 09:42 UTC

Why not just put an OTG port on it, then you could just plug a card reader in...?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 6, 2014 at 08:42 UTC as 54th comment | 9 replies
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

cannotshoot: Nice photos. In some photos, if you view in full res there's noise.

Of course The question is how much noise there would have been with a different camera and whether it would have caught and held the focus in the available light.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 5, 2014 at 15:43 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

Don Romano: Nothing about sport panning shots?

Image 5 is a panning shot. The point of the article, though, wasn't to provide a sports tutorial and motion blurred panning shots - while they require a lot of practice to do well - aren't a particularly good test of a camera. In fact, if I found myself at an event with a camera with low IQ and/or poor ISO performance a slow shutter speed, motion blur panning shot would probably the best option given the limitations of the equipment. They have their place, but, personally, I don't think they would have added anything to what was essentially a camera test.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 5, 2014 at 15:42 UTC
On Google Photo Sphere now available for iOS post (20 comments in total)

Incrementally, not dramatically increased. There are far more Android phones out there than yPhones.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2014 at 20:23 UTC as 6th comment | 2 replies
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

lindseyp: #12 is a great photo, IMO. Getting that water spray adds to the intensity.

Thanks - I know almost nothing about hockey, so I was pretty much shooting blind. I had been briefed about the water, though and it was a good tip!

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2014 at 10:23 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

StrongArm: I think you force use D810 in indoor sports photography.

If you intend to advertise the strengths of D810, you should pick the photos in outdoor sports photography, not indoor photography.

As you know, D810 has very high pixel densities so noise tends to increase dramatically as ISO speed ratings is increased.

You show the weakness of D810 using your indoor sports photography...

There are pictures of their hypothetical model here...

http://www.dxomark.com/About/In-depth-measurements/Measurements

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2014 at 09:46 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

StrongArm: I think you force use D810 in indoor sports photography.

If you intend to advertise the strengths of D810, you should pick the photos in outdoor sports photography, not indoor photography.

As you know, D810 has very high pixel densities so noise tends to increase dramatically as ISO speed ratings is increased.

You show the weakness of D810 using your indoor sports photography...

It's true that - all other things being equal - higher pixel densities mean that noise increases as ISO speed ratings increase. Other things aren't necessarily equal, though.
Here's how the D810 does against it's close rivals - look at the Sports low light ISO rating (higher is better...)
http://www.dxomark.com/Reviews/Nikon-D810-sensor-review-New-DxOMark-leader/Nikon-D810-versus-Sony-A7R-versus-Canon-EOS-5D-Mark-III-D810-has-slight-advantage-over-nearest-rival

...but more importantly, look at it vs other cameras where indoor sports photography is absolutely what they're designed for. You would expect the D4s to outperform it and it does. Nothing else comes close. But vs Canon's 1Dx, the D810 wins...
http://www.dxomark.com/Cameras/Compare/Side-by-side/Nikon-D810-versus-Nikon-D4s-versus-Canon-EOS-1Dx___963_945_753

Direct link | Posted on Aug 18, 2014 at 07:40 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

jljones: Are all the images above jpegs straight from the camera?

To be clear, I do send edited JPGs for time sensitive clients, which is why I use a RAW+JPG workflow, but very rarely send a JPG straight OOC.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 17, 2014 at 21:30 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

Wubslin: No. Still not buying one. Not impressed at all.

Does it even focus properly, or is this miracle of technology too far beyond Nikon?

> Does it even focus properly

Yes. Yes, it does.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 16, 2014 at 22:06 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

jljones: Are all the images above jpegs straight from the camera?

I may dig a few out, just for my own amusement.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 16, 2014 at 12:21 UTC
Total: 129, showing: 1 – 20
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