deep7

deep7

Lives in New Zealand (Aotearoa) New Zealand (Aotearoa)
Works as a writer/photographer/ecologist
Has a website at deeppics.com
Joined on May 10, 2008
About me:

God makes it, I see it and photograph it. Sometimes that works well!

Comments

Total: 544, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Heavy hitter: Sony FE 24-70mm F2.8 GM first shots (333 comments in total)
In reply to:

The Silver Nemesis: In order to be a "heavy hitter" it must be better than the Canon(24-70 wise). Is it?

Otherwise, maybe it is a bit early to shout "victory" right now.🍾

"Better"? Or just comparable?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2016 at 18:48 UTC
In reply to:

deep7: It's almost like Olympus had knocked on my door and asked me exactly what I wanted in a camera. This is what I have been waiting for for the last decade.

Well done, Olympus.

That's correct. Sony, Fuji and Panasonic have all put out "box with viewfinder in the corner" type bodies but none of the interchangeable lens options have been implemented this nicely. If you factor lens choice into it, that only leaves some Panasonic bodies, the designs of which appeal far less to me.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 27, 2016 at 19:16 UTC

It's almost like Olympus had knocked on my door and asked me exactly what I wanted in a camera. This is what I have been waiting for for the last decade.

Well done, Olympus.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 27, 2016 at 09:29 UTC as 184th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Calvin Chann: I'd be interested to see how many of these they sell. It's not the typical Fuji users lens.

" My experience with most mirrorless cameras is that the screen blackout between shots makes them very difficult to use for this end use. (I'm talking shooting on continuous). My current selection of bodies is X-T1, A7R2, OMD-EM1, A6000."

I use an EM1 and have never noticed this blackout you talk about. I do a lot of bird photography too.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 15, 2016 at 20:11 UTC

We use solar charging at work for various installations. Initially, I thought that either this camera is extremely efficient, that charger is amazing or they tested the thing at midday at the equator! Then I actually looked at the website and noticed the fast charge rate is via cable. That makes more sense.

Still, a nice concept if your "action" comes in bursts rather than being an all-day thing.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2016 at 02:54 UTC as 11th comment
In reply to:

deep7: "..with an equivalent maximum aperture of F8 and F12.6 on the 200mm and 800mm equivalent ends". One of the true advantages of m4/3 over larger formats - particularly at very long focal lengths, the extra depth of field is very welcome!

The second you crop, you are effectively shooting a smaller format. That's why the point is irrelevant to this discussion, even if there is some truth to it, in theory.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 7, 2016 at 02:10 UTC
In reply to:

deep7: "..with an equivalent maximum aperture of F8 and F12.6 on the 200mm and 800mm equivalent ends". One of the true advantages of m4/3 over larger formats - particularly at very long focal lengths, the extra depth of field is very welcome!

What are you smoking? I was quoting the author here. The statement is based on the relationship between focal length, aperture and the size of that part of the image circle used for capture. Pixel number/size is irrelevant. Yes, at any actual focal length, a smaller sensor gives a smaller apparent depth of field, simply because you enlarge imperfections more. However, that effect doesn't compensate for the difference between focal lengths needed to give the same angle of view, hence the statement holds.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 19:10 UTC

Amazing. Plus, it's actually realistically worth saving up for! Good on ya, Olympus.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 07:38 UTC as 29th comment
In reply to:

deep7: "..with an equivalent maximum aperture of F8 and F12.6 on the 200mm and 800mm equivalent ends". One of the true advantages of m4/3 over larger formats - particularly at very long focal lengths, the extra depth of field is very welcome!

That's an advantage of over 2:1 by your calculation. I hardly think subject isolation is going to be a problem at those focal lengths!

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 03:30 UTC

"..with an equivalent maximum aperture of F8 and F12.6 on the 200mm and 800mm equivalent ends". One of the true advantages of m4/3 over larger formats - particularly at very long focal lengths, the extra depth of field is very welcome!

Direct link | Posted on Jan 5, 2016 at 20:40 UTC as 27th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

PatMann: Not quite 645 full frame, but close (about 93.4%). My Pentax 645 slides are about 41.5 x 56mm in image area. Certainly still a long way from 6 x 6 or 6 x 7 medium format film sizes.

What they are referring to, in this case, is that that other sensors using bodies derived from or based on 6x4.5cm film cameras don't cover that frame fully, whereas this camera comes close. It's a valid use of the term but too obscure, without explanation, for people who have limited experience of larger formats.

Actually, that is a big advantage of the new sensor/camera combination if you shoot wider angle lenses and potentially more useful than the high pixel count.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 4, 2016 at 09:18 UTC
In reply to:

PatMann: Not quite 645 full frame, but close (about 93.4%). My Pentax 645 slides are about 41.5 x 56mm in image area. Certainly still a long way from 6 x 6 or 6 x 7 medium format film sizes.

The trend to use the term "full frame" to describe one particular sensor size in this digital age is ridiculous and largely meaningless. I normally use gear with a smaller sensor size and it also uses the full frame...

Direct link | Posted on Jan 3, 2016 at 19:55 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (551 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sergiusbr: Also, some lenses are prone to BF or FF with DSLRs and so the need of an AF microadjust mechanism for fine tuning the AF. I think most of advanced DSLRs have micro adjustments, though..

I've had an EM1 for nearly two years and missed that point! Hmm, got some work to do...

Direct link | Posted on Dec 11, 2015 at 19:09 UTC

The gallery isn't working properly. Funny, 'cos usually they work, albeit at a snail's pace. I just get the first picture without any info or options to click on anything.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 9, 2015 at 23:41 UTC as 37th comment
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (551 comments in total)
In reply to:

deep7: I can't imagine I'd ever buy another digital SLR now. When I pick one up, it feels like a dinosaur - film technology adapted for a purpose. Even though some optical viewfinders are lovely and big and bright and I understand why peoplelike them, they lack so much information. Electronic viewfinders all the way for me.

rrcad, you really should find the time to walk into a shop and try a camera with a modern electronic viewfinder (recent Olympus, Sony, Leica). You'll be amazed to see how things have progressed since you last tried one. They simply do not behave as you suggest.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 17:05 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (551 comments in total)

I can't imagine I'd ever buy another digital SLR now. When I pick one up, it feels like a dinosaur - film technology adapted for a purpose. Even though some optical viewfinders are lovely and big and bright and I understand why peoplelike them, they lack so much information. Electronic viewfinders all the way for me.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 7, 2015 at 19:59 UTC as 128th comment | 11 replies
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (551 comments in total)
In reply to:

Neez: "Furthermore, the need to constantly power a screen while shooting, combined with attempts to capitalize on the size benefits of mirrorless mean that battery life is much more limited on most mirrorless cameras - sometimes to a restrictive degree. "

This statement isn't correct because DSLR's have LCD screens that are on all the time as well. They don't suck down nearly as much juice as a mirrorless. LCD screens are known to be fairly efficient as long as backlighting is kept to a minimum, the LCD itself uses very little energy.

It's actually because the IMAGE SENSOR has to be on all the time, regardless of whether you're taking a shot or not, is why the battery life sucks on mirrorless cameras.

I own a sony a6000 and A7II, and have learned to just carry 3 spare batteries with me when i go out. But you are right, was never a concern on my canons.

Odd. When I used DSLRs, I never had the rear screen on unless I wanted to review photos or change settings. I still have a DSLR (that hardly ever comes out any more!) and that screen is virtually never on.

Even on my main "mirrorless" body, the rear screen is virtually never on, as I use the viewfinder. However, I understand the viewfinder is actually harder on the battery than the rear screen, which is why I set it to only come on using the eye detector.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 7, 2015 at 19:56 UTC

These samples show better image quality than expected. I shouldn't have been surprised, as this sensor family punches well above its weight on other cameras too. The lens handles the range well.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 22, 2015 at 20:16 UTC as 19th comment
On article DxO ONE real-world sample gallery (185 comments in total)
In reply to:

Biowizard: I worry enough connecting a USB lead to a camera, for fear of stresses breaking the plug. Using a tiny, fragile lightning connector to join two individual, relatively bulky items together, strikes me as putting way too much faith into the strength of tiny PCBs.

My camera is easier to hold than that combo, has a bigger sensor, and a large built-in touch screen. And it can transfer images to my iPhone or iPad wirelessly - or even be controlled from them.

With NO fragile connector to break.

Brian

Check out the website. The connector is not going to break anything.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 21, 2015 at 21:07 UTC
In reply to:

Becksvart: I think it looks like a compact, fast and nice little lens, if it performs OK wide open. I have a Zuiko F (Pen) 40 1,4 incoming for my A6k, maybe that's kinda equi-..sorry; just meant to say that I can see the allure of manual bright and compact lenses. Wouldn't trust any af not to hit the eyelash instead of the iris anyway.

That little Pen lens is quite nice, from f2 down. It has a lot of onion ring bokeh at f1.4. I use mine on an EM1 and quite enjoy it but it might end up an odd focal length on your Sony A6000?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2015 at 01:57 UTC
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