JohnHoppy

JohnHoppy

Lives in France Jonzac, France
Works as a Retired
Joined on Apr 24, 2011

Comments

Total: 30, showing: 1 – 20
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On Olympus takes Pen E-PL6 beyond Asia article (76 comments in total)
In reply to:

Greynerd: The best way to describe the EPL's is a standard everythingless PEN camera stripped bare of any but absolutely essential components but with the concession of a PASM dial. I just cannot understand why DSLR owners have never taken to mirrorless. A mystery indeed.
Edit: Probably they do not bother to show the reverse of the camera as there is so little there worth showing.

It is not true that "DSLR owners have never taken to mirrorless" - around the world they are. This perception appears to be that of North America, where the Marketing machines of the big SLR boys would have you believe the SLR remains the superior tool. The rest if us find the CSC has merits of its own. In Europe and particularly in Asia, mirrorless cameras are widely accepted now as a valuable genre. Like many, I traded my big, heavy SLR glass for m43 and would never go back. Mirrorless is just as valid and a lot more fun.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 12, 2014 at 21:14 UTC
On Am I missing something here? article (637 comments in total)
In reply to:

JohnHoppy: For once, DPR, I agree. Not that this latest V3 is a 'bad' camera - seems to have merit in some measure, but you are right to question where it fits in. But is it designed to "fit in"? Or is it designed to highlight the better sense in buying one of Nikon's SLR offerings instead? If Nikon were serious about a spear-thrust into new technologies, surely they would see what the other mirrorless companies were achieving as they swim against the tide of SLR resistance, and bring out a model that followed that line of success. They haven't. It all seems like a noble effort designed to go nowhere, and I suggest Michael Reichmann's view - http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/what_matters.shtml - is not far wide of the mark.

Are you saying Nikon has not followed in the same track as Canon? Nikon are still in a position of strength in the ILC market, this V3 is hardly their best shot in a sector that has gone from Zero in 2008 to 25% of the ILC market in 5 years. DPR are right to take a sceptical view.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 15, 2014 at 16:30 UTC
On Am I missing something here? article (637 comments in total)

For once, DPR, I agree. Not that this latest V3 is a 'bad' camera - seems to have merit in some measure, but you are right to question where it fits in. But is it designed to "fit in"? Or is it designed to highlight the better sense in buying one of Nikon's SLR offerings instead? If Nikon were serious about a spear-thrust into new technologies, surely they would see what the other mirrorless companies were achieving as they swim against the tide of SLR resistance, and bring out a model that followed that line of success. They haven't. It all seems like a noble effort designed to go nowhere, and I suggest Michael Reichmann's view - http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/what_matters.shtml - is not far wide of the mark.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 15, 2014 at 11:49 UTC as 78th comment | 4 replies
On Fujifilm X-T1 First Impressions Review preview (1657 comments in total)

Brief word of overdue praise for the author: Jeff Keller and Gordon Laing are the best reviewers in the business. Jeff's clear appraisals are always impartial and illuminating. I hope he is in charge of the full reviews of this and the EM10. One thing is for sure - photography has been a whole lot livelier since mirrorless came on the scene.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 28, 2014 at 10:40 UTC as 368th comment
On Enthusiast interchangeable lens camera 2013 roundup article (281 comments in total)
In reply to:

JohnHoppy: Whilst having no problem with dpreview's choices, I wonder why the scoring system is, by their admission, heavily weighted towards IQ. Where even cameras around the $700 Mark can now produce IQ that a few years ago you could only see in the best $2000+ cameras, might we not put IQ into a more comparative relationship with other factors? When so many good cams offer me high IQ, I am going to make a choice based on factors like handling and functionality or balance of features. With so many cams offering excellent potential IQ, maybe dpreview should look again at its "heavy weighting". Or perhaps they could indicate what miscroscopic level of detail they consider High IQ is.

I don't have a problem with any of that, Josh. I think DPR's problem is that slapping a single Neon sign on a camera that says "82%" or whatever is far too limited. Tends to promote elitism too ("Hey, my Nikon got 83%, that beats your Canon at 82%"). Some review sites (CameraLabs is always very fair) offer results at several levels and in fact DPR do too but then blow it all by giving a single % figure and admitting their scoring is weighted in ways many might dispute. My main point was about IQ being overrated, but DPR themselves admit Portability (e.g.) isn't factored in, and portability is another big issue today with Compact System Cameras making a big selling point here.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2013 at 20:20 UTC
On Enthusiast interchangeable lens camera 2013 roundup article (281 comments in total)

Whilst having no problem with dpreview's choices, I wonder why the scoring system is, by their admission, heavily weighted towards IQ. Where even cameras around the $700 Mark can now produce IQ that a few years ago you could only see in the best $2000+ cameras, might we not put IQ into a more comparative relationship with other factors? When so many good cams offer me high IQ, I am going to make a choice based on factors like handling and functionality or balance of features. With so many cams offering excellent potential IQ, maybe dpreview should look again at its "heavy weighting". Or perhaps they could indicate what miscroscopic level of detail they consider High IQ is.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 26, 2013 at 23:25 UTC as 48th comment | 4 replies
On Will consumer DSLRs be 'dead in 5 years?' post (132 comments in total)

I suspect many respondents here have not actually read Andrew Reid's full article. It repays reading. It may well be true that traditional photographic devices are in terminal decline, but unless innovation is allowed to flourish, that decline is most certain. The advent of new technology such as mirrorless is only part of a process that seeks to perpetuate a specific device for the enjoyment of photography as we know it. Market leader Canon's EOS-M was a poor effort that really said, "Our SLR is the thing to buy" and Nikon's 1 series was weakly conceived too. By steadfastly opposing mirrorless and throwing its weight against what it represented rather than embracing and adapting it, Canon in effect has projected its own possible fate. Things will have to change or Reid's scenario may be a reality in a few years.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 30, 2013 at 10:27 UTC as 25th comment | 6 replies
On Will consumer DSLRs be 'dead in 5 years?' post (132 comments in total)

The nature of photography and its tools has changed. Today pictures are taken on smartphones, not to frame on the wall but to share with the web or mail to friends. Photography has become part of the throw-away society. Most users don't care how many pixels the tool has, nor about exposure or IQ. Traditionally, to take pictures you bought a camera, now your phone does it. Only those who wish to do more with their images will now buy a specific tool for the job, and the nature of that tool is in question. The "serious" photographer aspires to get the best tool for the job: most are now waking up to the potential of newer technology so it's a foolish man who is going to back the old horses. Cost is a red herring. The "movers and shakers" in recent years have been the mirrorless boys. The mirror box for decades remained unchanged and unchangeable but electronics has changed that: it’s difficult to see budget SLRs continuing when economies of scale can make electronics cheaper.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 28, 2013 at 23:14 UTC as 74th comment
On Buying a digital SLR article (149 comments in total)
In reply to:

JohnHoppy: I could get really angry with dpreview. If you are going to write an article entitled “Digital SLR Buying Guide” and talk about SLRs, that’s fine, but you stick in Mirrorless at the end as though it were some sort of inferior sub-species. CSCs/mirrorless cameras are not SLRs, and in parts of the world outside USA are giving SLRs a pretty hard time. You also have a section here “Advantages” and “Disadvantages”, some of which are argumentative at least, where you don’t publish such a subjective opinion for SLRs, which further suggests you infer CSCs are inferior to SLRs. You do not have the same judgements to make about SLRs relative to CSCs. This is not good journalism – either treat Mirrorless as a separate category or leave people to judge the merits for themselves. You state there are “pros and cons to a mirrorless system camera when compared to a similarly priced DSLR”, but you don’t state the converse. In another couple of years, you will be looking at this differently.

Your reaction to my reaction is one of non-response to the points raised. Simply, I feel your article treats the Mirrorless species as an "also-ran" when many people believe it's as relevant to today's photography as Reflex has been. Further, I have Reflex and Mirrorless, what's this nonsense about a "loyalist defence"?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 6, 2012 at 15:37 UTC
On Buying a digital SLR article (149 comments in total)

I could get really angry with dpreview. If you are going to write an article entitled “Digital SLR Buying Guide” and talk about SLRs, that’s fine, but you stick in Mirrorless at the end as though it were some sort of inferior sub-species. CSCs/mirrorless cameras are not SLRs, and in parts of the world outside USA are giving SLRs a pretty hard time. You also have a section here “Advantages” and “Disadvantages”, some of which are argumentative at least, where you don’t publish such a subjective opinion for SLRs, which further suggests you infer CSCs are inferior to SLRs. You do not have the same judgements to make about SLRs relative to CSCs. This is not good journalism – either treat Mirrorless as a separate category or leave people to judge the merits for themselves. You state there are “pros and cons to a mirrorless system camera when compared to a similarly priced DSLR”, but you don’t state the converse. In another couple of years, you will be looking at this differently.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2012 at 16:19 UTC as 51st comment | 6 replies

Full marks to Easycass for his design study. And interesting reactions, mostly positive: ignore those detractors who feel they're qualified to criticise, let them design their own! I know how difficult it is, I designed my 'dream camera' a while ago and guess what I called it? - "C1". Now how odd is that?!! So there is design talent out there, my only question is - how do we get the camera makers to listen? Instead of rolling out the same incremental updates time after time.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 21, 2012 at 14:46 UTC as 147th comment

Having long shown their high-level 12mp SLRs (D700 etc.) offer top quality images without the excesses of high MP rates, Nikon are now playing the Canon card. Megapixel Wars again? We thought these two giants had put that nonsense aside.
It might be the best budget cam ever. Higher quality images? – Maybe. Many a pro will say differences between 12 and 18mp cameras are slight unless you print high-detail posters. If Nikon bring to a budget cam the quality of its 24mp D3X, okay, but I suspect this is about no more than selling the “bigger and better megapixels” charm to novices who seldom print past 8x10 and shoot on Auto, who would see no difference in their pics between this and a 12mp model. Whilst people pay, manufacturers will find increasing MP an easy route to sales. Nikon are not providing high MP at bargain price for altruistic reasons! Perhaps Nikon sees the growth of CSCs as hitting their base models and the MP card is the easiest one to play against newer technology.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 20, 2012 at 10:21 UTC as 48th comment
On Panasonic DMC GF5 preview (70 comments in total)
In reply to:

JohnHoppy: Seems Panasonic is stuck in its own groove, leaving Olympus to make the running for the m4/3 team. The GF3 and GF5 appeal more to smartphone users than photographers. Rather than pick our pockets with a 6-9 month cycle, most photographers would rather see a new camera in 15-18 months but with real progress & innovation. The GX1 is a short step from the GF1, if the G5 when it comes is barely a step up from G2 & G3, core Pany supporters are likely to feel short-changed. With the mirrorless market on a roll and Canon's effort appearing this summer/fall, Panasonic need to up their game.

Between us, FlashInThePan, my brother & I have had G1, GF1, GF2, G2 & G3, as well as Olympus models (and several Canons), does that qualify for “first hand experience”? We felt the G3’s tiny improvement in IQ (you have to produce min. 13x19 to see any sign of it) was not a good trade for G2’s superior handling. Shelling out good money every 8-9 months for minor incremental improvements – some very questionable – may be what the camera makers want but we don’t see the sense in it and would prefer a more serious upgrade less often. The GF5 appears to move the game on hardly at all from the GF3, which anyway was Panasonic trying to out-shrink Sony’s NEX. Sure, it will take good pictures, but better designs are out there: Panasonic should take more note of what their m4/3 team-mate are designing.... in my opinion.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 6, 2012 at 09:16 UTC
On Panasonic DMC GF5 preview (70 comments in total)

Seems Panasonic is stuck in its own groove, leaving Olympus to make the running for the m4/3 team. The GF3 and GF5 appeal more to smartphone users than photographers. Rather than pick our pockets with a 6-9 month cycle, most photographers would rather see a new camera in 15-18 months but with real progress & innovation. The GX1 is a short step from the GF1, if the G5 when it comes is barely a step up from G2 & G3, core Pany supporters are likely to feel short-changed. With the mirrorless market on a roll and Canon's effort appearing this summer/fall, Panasonic need to up their game.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 08:03 UTC as 31st comment | 6 replies
On Images of Panasonic GF5 start to appear article (118 comments in total)

DpReview is not launching into rumors territory, the GF5 has been known for a while, DPR is only reporting something upcoming. Question is, will the GF5 serve any purpose? New camera models appear ever more frequently, almost invariably of an incremental nature so more fool us if we buy into each new model: this GF5 is one of those. Rather than a model every 6 months that only tweaks a few parameters, how many of us would prefer a camera every 12-18 months that embodies new technology and real practical advances? Most cameras are boringly evolutionary, less often do we see more radical models like Olympus OM-D or Fuji X-Pro that excite our interest. Panasonic enthusiasts are not looking for a GF5 but want to see how Pany move the game on from the G2/G3/GH2, bearing in mind what the EM5 has brought to the m4/3 party: the G5 is on the way, it needs to be good to maintain impetus alongside the likes of Sony NEX, OM-D and Canon’s new CSC, which surely must break cover this summer.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 20, 2012 at 12:19 UTC as 33rd comment
In reply to:

JohnHoppy: The acrimony that goes down in these columns beggars belief! Some respondents are in for the kill on Olympus like Cassius and Brutus on the Ides of March! Why? How has Olympus hurt YOU? If Olympus, one of the prime innovators, folds or is subsumed into another company and their technical expertise diluted, it would be a great pity. An industry needs competition to drive forward innovation, which then benefits us, the consumers. Yes, the crooks have been caught with fingers in the till, and one hopes will be punished, but they are a handful and many good people remain to design, engineer and manufacture products a lot of us want. What some idiots here fail to understand is that if all the competition disappears and you are left with, shall we say, just Canon and Nikon, development will stagnate and prices will remain higher. Is that what you want? Be positive, for heavens sake, and stop baying for Olympus’ blood, let’s hope Olympus recovers for the good of all photographers.

You may be right, and “crooks with fingers in the till” is just an expression for brevity. I am sure boardrooms around the world reek of malpractice and financial greed and seldom get found out. But I can’t believe those Olympus directors acted out of an altruistic vision of benefits for their employees, rather that they sought to paper over the cracks of their misdemeanours. They have been arrested and we should await the judgement of the law, but their actions have brought a noble company name into disrepute and jeopardised the jobs of many good employees. If Olympus were selling mediocre product, these developments could easily be its ruin: fortunately, they are not.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2012 at 14:32 UTC

The acrimony that goes down in these columns beggars belief! Some respondents are in for the kill on Olympus like Cassius and Brutus on the Ides of March! Why? How has Olympus hurt YOU? If Olympus, one of the prime innovators, folds or is subsumed into another company and their technical expertise diluted, it would be a great pity. An industry needs competition to drive forward innovation, which then benefits us, the consumers. Yes, the crooks have been caught with fingers in the till, and one hopes will be punished, but they are a handful and many good people remain to design, engineer and manufacture products a lot of us want. What some idiots here fail to understand is that if all the competition disappears and you are left with, shall we say, just Canon and Nikon, development will stagnate and prices will remain higher. Is that what you want? Be positive, for heavens sake, and stop baying for Olympus’ blood, let’s hope Olympus recovers for the good of all photographers.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2012 at 09:31 UTC as 33rd comment | 7 replies
On CIPA starts to report growing mirrorless sales article (200 comments in total)
In reply to:

pacogwapo: Probably 70% of this mirrorless sales came from iphone and other android smartphones:)

........and my washing machine and television are mirrorless too! Come on, Class, pay attention - this article is headed "Sales and shipment figures for mirrorless CAMERAS". Herrumphh!

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2012 at 15:26 UTC
On CIPA starts to report growing mirrorless sales article (200 comments in total)

The figures are good news for those of us who have invested in the newer tech and want to see it doing well : hopefully the results of competition will be greater choice and lower costs for all of us, including the DSLR sector. However, pie charts alone aren’t so informative and don’t show, for example, the relative progress by mirrorless models over the past 2 years : in graph form, showing shifts in Compacts and DSLRs as well as CSCs, it would be far more informative. I should also be interested to see how it breaks down by manufacturer. The farthest you go here is to mention the Nikon 1 campaign, which was only recent. I’m sure such data is obtainable – have a word with Canon and ask for their logs and forward projections!

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2012 at 11:38 UTC as 21st comment
In reply to:

ccl2003: Is it true that the G X Vario PZ 14-42mm lens is not that good especially on max zoom? I read somewhere that max zoom produces blurry shots. I'm seriously considering the GX1 and to be honest I have no intention of changing the lens because it will function as my daily point and shoot cam. I'm hesitating in getting a Canon 550D or 600D due to their size and I'm after the GX1 due to its size, weight and performance.

Any inputs will definitely be appreciated. Thanks!

Slrgear.com found a trace of corner softness when wide open at full extension, but otherwise a super performer. If you don't NEED a powered lens get yourself the Pany 14-45mm, it's a cracker, and if the GX1 performs as well as my G2 & GF2 (I had a GF1 as well), you won't regret it.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2012 at 10:53 UTC
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