rhlpetrus

rhlpetrus

Lives in Brazil Campinas, Brazil
Works as a math professor
Joined on May 4, 2007

Comments

Total: 553, showing: 1 – 20
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On Nikon D810 Preview preview (1065 comments in total)

Lens issue: in RAW, lots of fringing, visible as you move into the corners. Also , lens seems soft in corners. Which lens was used?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 23, 2014 at 23:09 UTC as 41st comment | 2 replies

The 64 base ISO value may mean more than exposure settings flexibility, but for that we need to wait for proper lab and field tests.

Re guinea pigs, I always get the s versions of iPhones, never regreted it.

Edit: lots of guinea pigs out there

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Electronics-Digital-SLR-Cameras/zgbs/electronics/3017941/ref=zg_bs_nav_e_3_281052

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 20:41 UTC as 90th comment
On Apple to cease development of Aperture article (423 comments in total)

This is getting very upsetting, first Nikon drops its PP soft, now Apple, this Photos will likely be something related to iTunes, that horrible Big Brother idea by Jobs.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 17:48 UTC as 154th comment
On Nikon D810: What You Need to Know article (137 comments in total)
In reply to:

rhlpetrus: Thanks, this is what one expects from DPR, an a analysis of the new features, well-done (and a much better approach than the one in the "first impressions review" published yesterday, with some out of place negative comments, implicit in the title "a bit better"). This is actually a very welcome update in many aspects, especially for those that did not go for the original versions.

Yesterday's "review" should have been called "First impressionistic review"... ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 13:36 UTC
On Nikon D810: What You Need to Know article (137 comments in total)
In reply to:

Timbukto: You can always count on me to nitpick, but the redesigned mirror bounce/damping is not only good for studio, landscape, or macro, but is potentially a boon for hand-held shooting as well. It is EFC alone that is not that beneficial for TTL shooting. Historically mirror bounce usually only effects rather slower shutter speeds than what is typically used for even low light people shots, etc...however its certainly within the realm of possibility that mirror bounce/damping can improve burst stability! Of course unfortunately none of this matters much unless someone takes the time of establishing a baseline amongst many DSLRs... The analog oscilloscope shots done by DPReview members in the MFT forum can lead the way of making some rather effective tests however. In short, EFC should benefit liveview shots. Mirror redesign is the opposite, has not much effect on liveview shots when EFC is enabled and should benefit TTL shots.

ML is still in need for a vision IMO. The best approach seems to be m43, with a good set of lenses and camera models. The problem is that they use a relative small sensor, "good enough" as many say for many people, but not up to the level of FF. Sony has the sensor but still needs to decide on the mount, lens lines, etc, they change everything every two years (where are the A900/A850 ...?) Likely ML will come of age when ... Canon and Nikon go for it in their pro lines ;-).

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 12:44 UTC
On Nikon D810: What You Need to Know article (137 comments in total)
In reply to:

benbammens: I like this article :) Makes it easier to understand what Nikon changed in the camera :)

Most releases show very minor changes or very big ones. This was basically a midterm update but it included a myriad of minor upgrades, so it made sense to do it. many people complained that their first impressions review really missed the various changes, in an objective way, and was a more of a first "impressionistic" review.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 12:39 UTC
On Nikon D810: What You Need to Know article (137 comments in total)
In reply to:

jnxr: Nikon need 2 tries to get it right for every FF model:
D4 ---> D4s
D600 ---> D610
D800 ---> D810
Moral of the story, don't buy their first model, wait for the fixed version.

This is likely true for all high tech stuff these days, I usually get the s version of iPhones. But what was the issue with the D4? And, actually, what was the one with the D800/e? If ypou mean the assymetric focus issue, my view was that the original 51 pt focus system was never designed to work with 36MP at the extreme points, so it was not really an issue, but technological limitations that have been solved now. Only the dust issue with the D600 was a real one.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 12:37 UTC
On Nikon D810: What You Need to Know article (137 comments in total)
In reply to:

fmian: So will they be replacing mirrors for D800 users? Or free upgrades to the D810? Sounds like D800 was a premature release if early reviewers noted how difficult it was to get sharp results but Nikon didn't pick up on it during their own testing. And now the D810 fixes that and pads it with features that could have been in a firmware update anyway...
Oh look over here at this shiny new camera while we sweep the old one under the rug...

@fmian: I doubt you will see very little difference in actual shooting, but it's good that Nikon is trying to make their cameras as good as they can. Do you have a a D800/e?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 12:34 UTC
On Nikon D810: What You Need to Know article (137 comments in total)
In reply to:

km25: Things will always improve, part of this game is to hold back just a bit, to make look like your always and improving. Therefore more money for them too. If this game is new to you, you should just take pictures and for get about new cameras.

Hmm, do you think Nikon was holding back when they introduced the D3, or when they first introduced the D800/e? Technology really moves on, as does design. Programmed obsolescence is real, but a very dangerous game these days in the photo business, my bet is that none of the major players are holding technology back now.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 12:33 UTC
On Nikon D810: What You Need to Know article (137 comments in total)
In reply to:

KW Phua: From the improvement on D810, we can confirm that D800/E have certain defects by design. The improvement is actually the correction. Luckily, Nikon not using sensor stabiliser. The vibration caused by the shuttle will also vibrate the sensor. This is a good learning cure for all Camera manufacturers when designing hi MP camera. Too bad, we have to pay for their mistake.

Improving does not imply that earlier versions were "defective", technology and design just move on.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 12:30 UTC
On Nikon D810: What You Need to Know article (137 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nukunukoo: I don't get it. With or without an OLPF is a binary thing: you either have it or not. It's like saying a woman became "slightly" pregnant! So all this while that we have been hearing that the D800e has no OLPF, it actually has and the "effect" is created automagically? So does that mean that the D7100 without the OLPF will suddenly be like the D800e when the D7200 comes out? Kindly clarify.

The point was that they had the basic sensor designed, including microlenses, to have the filter on, so they could not just do w/o it in the D800e, they used an extra cancelling system, which, in principle, could still produce a reduction in detail and/or of light gathering properties of the sensor. That is not the case anymore, they redesigned the whole system so as not to have the AA system. Not too difficult to understand.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 12:28 UTC
On Nikon D810: What You Need to Know article (137 comments in total)

Thanks, this is what one expects from DPR, an a analysis of the new features, well-done (and a much better approach than the one in the "first impressions review" published yesterday, with some out of place negative comments, implicit in the title "a bit better"). This is actually a very welcome update in many aspects, especially for those that did not go for the original versions.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 12:24 UTC as 22nd comment | 5 replies
On Nikon D810 Preview preview (1065 comments in total)
In reply to:

jaaboucher: The original D800 is a huge pain for daily news shooting. The insane file size and slow frame rate makes sports a pain and slows down the workflow in every part of the newsroom. Thank god Nikon put some thought into what journalists actually need, maybe people will upgrade their D700s.

I think the 1.2x crop at 6fps w/o grip , 25MP, which could be reduced in size by means of 12bit RAW option, is a great action/PJ format.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 26, 2014 at 12:53 UTC
On Nikon D810 Preview preview (1065 comments in total)

Those interested in video certainly have other options, for those that are interested in stills, this is likely the best all-around camera available: best dslr at base ISO and almost top high ISO performance, with top resolution as well. Actually, I think DPR in this first impressions preview has downplayed the many small improvements in all areas, AF, LCD, higher fps, video, electronic shutter, likely base ISO DR (base iso at 64 indicates higher full-well capacity), and many other items. This may be an incremental update, but it covers all areas of performance. "Excitement" factor is not really relevant at this level of performance and to most of the public which this camera is directed at.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 26, 2014 at 12:50 UTC as 195th comment | 1 reply

The test would bemore meaningful if the compared cameras were the D4s and the 1Dx. Anyway, very interesting that Sony has designed and produced such a sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 22, 2014 at 15:36 UTC as 107th comment
In reply to:

igorek7: The lens is a high-quality alternative to the cheep and decent Panasonic 14mm f/2.5, similarly as Panasonic-Leica 25mm f/1.4 is to Panasonic 20mm f/1.7. I am considering to buy 15mm together with Lumix GM1. As a kit lens, the price is right.

I now hope that Panasonic would return 150mm f/2.8 to their roadmap, and would design 10mm f/2.5 or similarly wide-angle rectilinear prime.

They should sell it with teh GX7, much more appropriate IMO. The sell with the lower level 20 f/1.7, go figure!

Direct link | Posted on Mar 24, 2014 at 17:43 UTC
In reply to:

Shield3: Not bad for a FF equivalent of 30mm F/3.4.

Boring ... the equivalent police corps are still alive. Equivalence is such a ridiculous idea, by the way. If one likes to see what a top pro photog uses for his latest Elle cover with the D800, check here:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/53347021

A lowly 24-120 f/4, no less!

Direct link | Posted on Mar 24, 2014 at 17:41 UTC

One more reason for anyone looking for a compact system to go for m43, congrats to the users of the system (and to future ones).

Direct link | Posted on Mar 24, 2014 at 17:36 UTC as 22nd comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

al_in_philly: Now Panasonic, in partnership with Leica, has made the perfect "trinity" of fast walk around primes. First was the standard focal length 25mm f/1.4. Just recently they gave us the longer "portrait" 42.5mm f1.2. And soon we'll have a "photojournalist" 17mm f/1.7. Given how easy it is to carry around a stealthy little m4/3 body and three lenses, street photography has been given an interesting twist.

Indeed, and the reason I'm thinking of getting a GX7 and tese lenses, plus the UWA zoom, since I shoot mostly WA. Nice system.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 24, 2014 at 17:33 UTC
In reply to:

Rachotilko: The cams manufacturers went crazy pricewise lately.

BTW, I'd like to ask the ones who remember 1980s: how much did an average Joe have to work to buy a decent film camera ? I've got a feeling that photography (if one doesn't want to go P&S pinhead way) has really become unaccessible to average population of the world - as opposed to much of the 20th century.

Judging by this : have we really progressed as a civilization ? As a child I was told that in 21st century we'll live in some kind of futuristic paradise. Instead, buying a decent photographic gear has become inaccessible to most.

You are wrong, mostly. An slr w/o any electronic parts, no sensor, used to cost more than the basic ones do today. The difference wqs that the top dslr still didn't carry much technology, besides the OPV and the shutter mechanism. It was, therefore, not much more expensive than the basic models. Think Nikkormat and Nikon F. As technology evolved, especially metering and AF, things started to get more complicated. Todays cameras use so much technology and the sensor/ADC system, which was then the film.

Think of how much you spent in film, film development, printing in those days, and you'll see camera systems today are less expensive in the long run.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 24, 2014 at 17:31 UTC
Total: 553, showing: 1 – 20
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