DonaldHaines

DonaldHaines

Joined on Apr 5, 2012

Comments

Total: 22, showing: 1 – 20
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DonaldHaines: For all those saying that the wireless communications ability of iphones and thier ability to run apps makes high end cameras irrevelant.... what do you have to say about wireless enabled DSLR's? Think of them as a removable high quality camera that can send higher quality images to your iphone....

There are no pat answers. The lines are blurred. You have the opportunity to choose what you want for your needs... we are not all the same.

Personally, I look forward to shooting in the field with a DSLR, wireless transfer to an Ipad where the image can be viewed and manipulated, and then sent back to the office.... and for a lot of inspection work, the Ipad camera is good enough.... Beats the heck out of having to carry around a heavy laptop.

For me these are tools to get the job done, it is not grounds for a religous war.

You are limited on a tablet..... but it sure is better than the tiny screen on the back of the camera..... You can confirm that you have good focus and good saturation, you can verify that the picture is good enough to edit later... Complex editing can be done by you later at home or work, or by a person you email the field pics to.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2012 at 18:59 UTC

For all those saying that the wireless communications ability of iphones and thier ability to run apps makes high end cameras irrevelant.... what do you have to say about wireless enabled DSLR's? Think of them as a removable high quality camera that can send higher quality images to your iphone....

There are no pat answers. The lines are blurred. You have the opportunity to choose what you want for your needs... we are not all the same.

Personally, I look forward to shooting in the field with a DSLR, wireless transfer to an Ipad where the image can be viewed and manipulated, and then sent back to the office.... and for a lot of inspection work, the Ipad camera is good enough.... Beats the heck out of having to carry around a heavy laptop.

For me these are tools to get the job done, it is not grounds for a religous war.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2012 at 14:02 UTC as 17th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

DonaldHaines: I use the camera on an Ipad a lot at work.... It is great to use for looking around corners in an equipment rack. it is great for a quick snap or two to serve as a reminder as to how you put something together or took it apart, but when it is time for real doccumentation, out comes the Canon....

it is a tool, use the right tool for the job.

@ Craig..
Actually, a few of them have been printed, but only in internal documents... nothing I'd want to blow up and put on the wall.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 25, 2012 at 12:12 UTC
In reply to:

DonaldHaines: I use the camera on an Ipad a lot at work.... It is great to use for looking around corners in an equipment rack. it is great for a quick snap or two to serve as a reminder as to how you put something together or took it apart, but when it is time for real doccumentation, out comes the Canon....

it is a tool, use the right tool for the job.

Oops... meant to say Ipod, not Pad. It takes much better pictures than a DSLR after being inserted through a 1.5 inch wide slot.....

Direct link | Posted on Sep 25, 2012 at 12:09 UTC

I found the review very biased and set up with highly artificial conditions to favour the Iphone.

I did a quick comparison of my own, very biased in the other direction....

Task: Get a picture of the moon.
Iphone 4 - 320 blurry and highly overexposed pixels wide at maximum zoom, no recognizable surface features, handheld exposure.
Canon60D - 2230 properly exposed and very sharp pixels wide through 800mm lens and 1.4x teleconverter taken on tracking mount.
Canon60D - 13,560 properly exposed and not so sharp pixels wide through telescope and 2x barlow on tracking mount.

Gee.... my biased comparison differs from your biased comparison....

Direct link | Posted on Sep 25, 2012 at 02:47 UTC as 52nd comment

I use the camera on an Ipad a lot at work.... It is great to use for looking around corners in an equipment rack. it is great for a quick snap or two to serve as a reminder as to how you put something together or took it apart, but when it is time for real doccumentation, out comes the Canon....

it is a tool, use the right tool for the job.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 25, 2012 at 02:16 UTC as 53rd comment | 4 replies

What happens when we further blur the lines and the iPhone becomes the "tilt-swivel" screen on a wireless enabled DSLR?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 25, 2012 at 00:11 UTC as 59th comment
On Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

NancyP: I don't know much about astrophotography, but the samples on Canon's Japanese website do show a definite increase in red sensitivity. It would seem that the sensor bandpass filter change is the main improvement in the camera body. The rest seems to be bundled "essentials" allowing long exposure with mirror lock-up, easy astro-stacking protocol (I forget what this is called in astrophotography - immunofluorescence microscopy uses the same averaging technique to cut noise). Have fun folks! The closest that I have come to astrophotography is the ever-popular super-tele moon shot.

Eroel:
I am using Adobe Premiere to convert my files. I think that just about any video editing software will work.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 20:37 UTC
On Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

NancyP: I don't know much about astrophotography, but the samples on Canon's Japanese website do show a definite increase in red sensitivity. It would seem that the sensor bandpass filter change is the main improvement in the camera body. The rest seems to be bundled "essentials" allowing long exposure with mirror lock-up, easy astro-stacking protocol (I forget what this is called in astrophotography - immunofluorescence microscopy uses the same averaging technique to cut noise). Have fun folks! The closest that I have come to astrophotography is the ever-popular super-tele moon shot.

In astrophotograpy the process of stacking photos together is called photo stacking......... my aren't we an imaginative bunch :-)

If you don't have a tracking mount you can shoot video of an object as it travels across your camera screen, take the video into your video editing software and do a pan of the video... after that you have a stationary object.... then feed that stabilized video into a photo stacker ( you may need an intermediate step to extract individual frames, depending on the software being used) It works suprisingly well and shows that you don't need thousands of dollars of specialized gear to get out there and have fun. I got hooked on astrophotography with a fixed tripod, star trails, and normal lenses.

P.S., I am no expert on astrophotography but I am really having a great time learning....

Direct link | Posted on Apr 8, 2012 at 15:18 UTC
On Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

Xon_Fedaa: "“The EOS 60Da is a testament to the constant desire to meet the needs of every customer, including those in specialized fields,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies & Communications Group, Canon U.S.A."

Really, Mr. Ishizuka? Please point out to me Canon's offerings that have user removable IR filters to enable the sizable constituency of photography enthusiasts and artisans to take infrared photos.

Indeed, it would seem Canon's "desire to meet the needs of every customer, including those in specialized fields" isn't being fully realized.

Sigma SD1, here I come.

Regards,

Xon

@Joeseph... agreed! Translating technical documents is a minefield... Translaters are language experts and usually have very little technical knowledge. I see this all the time at work. Another favourite translation involved the definition of equipment failure and somehow got translated to "ejection of parts".. I hope that radio never fails.....

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 22:32 UTC
On Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

Xon_Fedaa: "“The EOS 60Da is a testament to the constant desire to meet the needs of every customer, including those in specialized fields,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies & Communications Group, Canon U.S.A."

Really, Mr. Ishizuka? Please point out to me Canon's offerings that have user removable IR filters to enable the sizable constituency of photography enthusiasts and artisans to take infrared photos.

Indeed, it would seem Canon's "desire to meet the needs of every customer, including those in specialized fields" isn't being fully realized.

Sigma SD1, here I come.

Regards,

Xon

Gentlemen... step back...

Press releases are passed through the marketing people and they get edited away from what the technical people are saying. Then they pass through translators and a statement changes from "nebulas AND the solar system" in Japanese, to "nebulas IN the solar system" in english. Are we really anal enough to nitpick over things like that? We should laugh at those things, not fight over them.... I still smile when I think of Sony and the "exploding view" of thier camera, when it is obvious that they meant "exploded view".....

A press release means that something new is coming. We have seen a few samples and they look interesting but remember that those are PROCESSED images that have been vetted by the marketing people. Most people realize this and can't wait to see an independent review.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 15:21 UTC
On Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

wutsurstyle: Genuine question here.. what adapter is used to attach telescopes to EOS mounts such as this camera?

Telescope optics are 2 inch and 1.25 inch. You can get adapters to go from EOS ( or any other mount) to T mount, and an adapter from T mount to either 2 or 1.25 inch optics.

Most telescopes use 1.25 inch optics so a 1.25 mount will fit everything. Almost all telescopes have the capacity to handle 2 inch, and if you can, that's the way to go as it blocks less light than 1.25 and is a far sturdier mount.

Many telescopes come with 1.25 but you can purchase options to allow 2 inch, for example the celestron Schmidt-cassigrains are sold with 1.25, but $25 gets you a 2 inch mount.

I'd go look in my local telescope store and ask them about mounts.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 11:23 UTC
On Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mssimo: 18-55mm lens is perfect for ASTRONOMY...right?

Yes, I use my 60D on a telescope..... but I also use it with regular lenses.... including a 10-20mm zoom. (ever try to take a picture of the milky way with a telescope??????) Not all astrophotograpy is through 20 inch telescopes.....

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 06:07 UTC
On Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

K_Photo_Teach: Pentax could compete with this if they did a special astrophotography DSLR because of the GPS adjusting the sensor using the sensor stabilizer to prevent start trailing.

Would LOVE for other manufacturers to bring out similiar tech

Astrophotography means LONG exposures. We are not talking ten or twenty seconds here.... we are talking half hour range...

Cameras that "track motion" need enough light to be able to detect that motion and for a lot of astrophography there may not be enough.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 05:55 UTC
On Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

MYKC: Well done Canon (from a micro 4/3 user) for releasing a camera aimed at a small niche market! It is two cameras in one, a normal DSLR, and a camera suitable for astroimaging. However, I'm confused as to how large the increase in red sensitivity will actually be. The press release states that "hydrogen-alpha light sensitivity that is approximately three times higher than that of a normal Canon DSLR camera. This produces a 20-percent higher transmittance of Hydrogen Alpha line".
The "silent shooting" feature is also interesting; I wonder how it is implemented? The fully articulated LCD is great for use with telescopes (as is the case with the Panasonic GH2).
Can the 60D produce video using just the small central portion of the sensor? That would make it a great camera for imaging the planets too.
Most astrophotographers who use DSLRs favour Canon, and many astroimaging software packages have features for PC control of Canon cameras, so this will generate a lot of interest.

Yes, the 60D does silent shooting and mirror lockup.... a remote shutter is a WONDERFUL option to get as pressing the shutter release means camera shake.

The quick solution is to use the timer to take pictures, but set it for 10 seconds as 2 seconds is not long enough for things to settle down.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 05:51 UTC
On Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

MYKC: Well done Canon (from a micro 4/3 user) for releasing a camera aimed at a small niche market! It is two cameras in one, a normal DSLR, and a camera suitable for astroimaging. However, I'm confused as to how large the increase in red sensitivity will actually be. The press release states that "hydrogen-alpha light sensitivity that is approximately three times higher than that of a normal Canon DSLR camera. This produces a 20-percent higher transmittance of Hydrogen Alpha line".
The "silent shooting" feature is also interesting; I wonder how it is implemented? The fully articulated LCD is great for use with telescopes (as is the case with the Panasonic GH2).
Can the 60D produce video using just the small central portion of the sensor? That would make it a great camera for imaging the planets too.
Most astrophotographers who use DSLRs favour Canon, and many astroimaging software packages have features for PC control of Canon cameras, so this will generate a lot of interest.

One of the 60D video modes is "CROP 640", whic h is a 640 x 400 video cropped from the center portion of the sensor, sort of like an 8 or 9 times digital zoom. I have been playing with it to shoot jupiter and Saturn and usinf photo-stacking to get far better quality results than any individual frame.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 05:47 UTC
On Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

DaveMarx: Why does a camera strapped to a telescope, that's being pitched on the benefits of the camera's LCD display for viewing (hard to use an OVF when the mirror's locked up)... why does it need a mirror, OVF, and focal plane shutter (besides dust control)?

It's not sensor size any more. If I was Sony, and I was interested in making a splash in the scientific community, why not in astrophotography, with all its passionate amateurs? Save those budget-strapped folks a small bundle by ditching unnecessary mechanical systems, and it reduces weight-related stress on the telescope to boot. AND, it'll still do fine as a general-purpose camera.

Sure, for someone who owns a pile of Canon glass, and is using that camera for a whole lot more than astrophotography... it's another set of tools on the Swiss Army Knife. But this would have been a really cool way for Canon to introduce its mirrorless camera. It's not like they don't know how to make 'em. They're called pro video cameras.

I should also mention an included piece of software "EOS UTILITY" that comes with the 60D and allows you to hook up a laptop to the camera.... If you think "live view" is great on a 3" screen, just wait till you see it on a 14" screen.....

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 05:30 UTC
On Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

DaveMarx: Why does a camera strapped to a telescope, that's being pitched on the benefits of the camera's LCD display for viewing (hard to use an OVF when the mirror's locked up)... why does it need a mirror, OVF, and focal plane shutter (besides dust control)?

It's not sensor size any more. If I was Sony, and I was interested in making a splash in the scientific community, why not in astrophotography, with all its passionate amateurs? Save those budget-strapped folks a small bundle by ditching unnecessary mechanical systems, and it reduces weight-related stress on the telescope to boot. AND, it'll still do fine as a general-purpose camera.

Sure, for someone who owns a pile of Canon glass, and is using that camera for a whole lot more than astrophotography... it's another set of tools on the Swiss Army Knife. But this would have been a really cool way for Canon to introduce its mirrorless camera. It's not like they don't know how to make 'em. They're called pro video cameras.

As a 60D user, when hand-holding the camera with lenses I probably shoot 95 percent "through the lens". Put it on a tripod and it becomes 75 percent "live view". Mount it to the telescope and it's 100 percent "live view". For a multipurpose camera that's the way to go, and despite the tweaks for astrophotography, the 60Da remains a multipurpose camera.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 05:24 UTC
On Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joshlovesphotos: And.....here we go again DPReview. You basically copy and pasted the advertising from Canon's press release onto your "Review" site. Only problem is, when you "review" something, isn't the point of the site to take another, more objective view of a product? You should call yourselves, DPAdvertisers.

Problem? Well, besides apparently being the only person here with an iq over 100, how about the fact that hydrogen-alpha light is NOT the true color of the cosmos. You know those galaxy and nebulae that you see on science shows in awe striking color? Yeah. Thats false color. That's not TRUE color, I don't care how subjective it is. The human eye does not see colors that way. This article's main title should read "CANON ANNOUNCES MODIFIED 60D (60DA) WITH STRONGER INFRARED SENSOR THAT PRODUCES FALSE COLOR IN ORDER TO MORE EASILY PHOTOGRAPH THE COSMOS".

So basically you just pasted NEWS and FALSE ADVERTISING onto your "review" site, that is just chock full of adverts really.

The use of white balance is to distort colors.... The act of aiming the camera is to edit out the rest of the sphere... and don't even get me started on post processing... False colour is not a "bug", it's a feature that many strive for. There is always a strong creative component in photography and astrophotography is no different.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 05:15 UTC
On Canon launches EOS 60Da DSLR for astrophotography article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

micahmedia: Maxmax offers more flavors than this, if it's science ye be aftar.

High ISO astrophotography? Next they'll be suggesting flash astrophotography...

Canon's sample images are ISO1600 for 480 seconds. I have been playing with a regular 60D and seem to like the 1600 to 3200 range with good results. I used a different make of camera and found that going beyond 800 was unusable.

Yeah, I would say that high ISO performance is important.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2012 at 04:24 UTC
Total: 22, showing: 1 – 20
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