JDThomas

JDThomas

Lives in United States Austin, TX, United States
Works as a photographer / author
Has a website at NikonDFG.com
Joined on Jul 2, 2012
About me:

Entertainment photographer for Corbis Images / AP Images, Nikon Digital Field Guide & Concert and Live Music Photography author, Gretsch guitar strangler.

Comments

Total: 496, showing: 1 – 20
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On Niko announces service advisory for D810 'bright spots' article (248 comments in total)
In reply to:

Saffron_Blaze: I will just see about returning it to henry's canada. I am not shipping my camera off for who knows how many times.

@Pastynator: "Anyone who doesn't think about having that option open for themselves when all it takes is a free repair, is a bad photographer."

I fail to see how not fixing your camera by choice makes someone a "bad photographer". Being a good photographer is about the ability to make consistently good images is it not? Or is a photographer only good when his gear is good?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2014 at 05:23 UTC
On Niko announces service advisory for D810 'bright spots' article (248 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ednaz: Put the recalls into perspective - auto defects that need recalls can kill you. GM is recalling near 100% of several model lines over five years. Makes Nikon's track record look pretty good - and nobody died from D600 oil spots.

Complex stuff breaks in complex ways. More complexity equals more complex ways to fail, and less certainty in stress testing. That's true whether it's cameras, cars, or word processing software.

Get out your magnifying glass. You might have a rusty screw.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2014 at 02:28 UTC
On Niko announces service advisory for D810 'bright spots' article (248 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ednaz: Put the recalls into perspective - auto defects that need recalls can kill you. GM is recalling near 100% of several model lines over five years. Makes Nikon's track record look pretty good - and nobody died from D600 oil spots.

Complex stuff breaks in complex ways. More complexity equals more complex ways to fail, and less certainty in stress testing. That's true whether it's cameras, cars, or word processing software.

The perspective you need is right in what you say, "Google the word recall." Before the internet there weren't place where every little thing was the subject of scrutiny by millions of people.

The truth is that most people wouldn't have noticed anything wrong with their camera if it wasn't for the overreaction of internet camera nerds.

I saw a whole thread somewhere discussing ONE guy's camera that had a rusty screw in it. Suddenly dozens of people were scrutinizing their cameras looking for rusty screws.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2014 at 01:49 UTC
On Niko announces service advisory for D810 'bright spots' article (248 comments in total)
In reply to:

Zeisschen: No wonder Nikon is almost bankrupt:

- Too many flaws in their last models. Even if they admit it, it doesn't improve their reputation.
- The product design is 90s, the DSLR "technology" at the end of it's era.
- The mirrorless strategy is pathetic. Overprized, tiny sensor.

No way they are going to win new customers in the younger generation with the current strategy.

Game over Nikon

Hahaha.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2014 at 01:41 UTC
On Niko announces service advisory for D810 'bright spots' article (248 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ednaz: Put the recalls into perspective - auto defects that need recalls can kill you. GM is recalling near 100% of several model lines over five years. Makes Nikon's track record look pretty good - and nobody died from D600 oil spots.

Complex stuff breaks in complex ways. More complexity equals more complex ways to fail, and less certainty in stress testing. That's true whether it's cameras, cars, or word processing software.

"...and nobody died from D600 oil spots."

Maybe some photographer's careers died? That's why they sit at their computers all day obsessing on camera forums.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2014 at 22:54 UTC
On Niko announces service advisory for D810 'bright spots' article (248 comments in total)
In reply to:

EricCul: Every photographer knows that top of range cameras are sophisticated electronic devices. Nikon, Canon, Sony, Pentax, the lot of them.

You can easily tell photographers apart from those who just read about cameras online by the way the latter become outraged with relatively minor electronic issues.

I had a look at the returns list of a larger camera seller recently. Nikon are no where near the top of the list for returns and defects, despite being one of the most sold brands there.

If you want zero electronic faults, then electronic products are not for you.

I shot with my D600 for months before I noticed any spots. Then I cleaned it and went for another few months. Then I cleaned it and sold it. Not because of the spots, because of the handling.

If I had bought a D810 it would likely have been months before I noticed anything wrong. And I probably wouldn't rush to send it in. I mean how important are long exposures to most photographers?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2014 at 22:16 UTC
On Niko announces service advisory for D810 'bright spots' article (248 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jogger: DPR comments are the same level as YouTube...

Let's not forget that in between the D610 and D810 we had the Df and D4s. Neither of those cameras were faulty.

And you can add in the D5200, D3200, D5300, D3300, none of which had faults either.

So out of 10 cameras released since the D600 there are 2 with minor faults (D800/D810) and one with a substantial but not disastrous problem (D600).

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2014 at 21:52 UTC
On Niko announces service advisory for D810 'bright spots' article (248 comments in total)
In reply to:

jaaboucher: What an odd combination of factors. How did they even find out this is a problem?

Nasim Mansurov makes some vague claim of making the discovery:

"we recently reported the thermal issue with the Nikon D810 when using long shutter speeds and we immediately reported the issue to Nikon, as soon as we confirmed that all camera samples we’ve handled so far had the same problem."

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2014 at 20:27 UTC
On Niko announces service advisory for D810 'bright spots' article (248 comments in total)

I'm waiting for the "I'm switching to Fuji" posts to start rolling in.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2014 at 20:21 UTC as 35th comment | 1 reply
On Niko announces service advisory for D810 'bright spots' article (248 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jogger: DPR comments are the same level as YouTube...

"D800 - Left Focus issues
D610 - Oil spots
D810 - Bright spots"

The D610 FIXED the oil spots. So, that's not three in a row.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2014 at 20:20 UTC
On Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art Lab Test Review preview (555 comments in total)
In reply to:

starwolfy: Nothing beats a leica summilux f1.4 asph.
Cheaper than an Otus, way smaller and way lighter than both Otus and this Sigma lens. The only thing this Sigma has for it is better value per dollar and autofocus. Its a very good lens but I still cannot accept weight a size compromises you have to make to enter dslr world. The biggest joke is when u compare an Othus to the Leica Lux...it looks like a serious joke from size.

I can show you the photos if you want. I'm not just saying it for the hell of it.

The real truth of it is that zone focus will beat AF always, but leaving that out, I'd rather manually focus and get one exceptional image than have my camera autofocus and get 30 mediocre images.

And even if the AF captured a great moment, the satisfaction of catching a great moment against the odds by manual focusing is more fulfilling. I mean don't get me wrong, I use AF when I have to get the shot for the money, but I always love the photos that I work for best.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 11, 2014 at 13:05 UTC
In reply to:

Robgo2: The covers of "Abbey Road" and "Sgt. Pepper" are almost certainly the most famous in the history of recorded music and are fitting icons for some of the greatest pop music ever.

@Robgo2: The funny thing is that your son may not think Elvis influences the music of today, but if you listen to it and break it down it's there. In the 80's when bands like Motley Crue were blowing people's minds they were simply rehashing 3 chord 12 bar I-IV-V blues and rockabilly rhythms.

Contemporary bands like the Avett Bros., Kings of Leon, and Edward Sharp and the Magnetic Zeroes are doing the same thing. It's all based around the Pentatonic scale. You just have to look at it closely. It's there.

And if you want to get down to brass tacks, when the Beatles put out Sgt. Pepper's and supposedly "redefined" rock music what they were actually doing was trying to one up the Beach Boys "Pet Sounds" which was released a year earlier. THAT was the record the Beatles drew inspiration from. And Brian Wilson was a huge Elvis fan.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 11, 2014 at 12:54 UTC
In reply to:

Robgo2: The covers of "Abbey Road" and "Sgt. Pepper" are almost certainly the most famous in the history of recorded music and are fitting icons for some of the greatest pop music ever.

@Robgo2: Maybe you're not into the rockabilly scene. You don't come into contact with people that really dig Elvis. I'm not particularly old, just turned 40, but I have a collection of early Elvis records that's worth more than I'd like to say. I know tons of young kids that are really into Elvis. I know more kids that are into the Clash than the Beatles. You've got to look in the right places.

Ask Brian Setzer, who sells out every show he plays if he thinks Elvis' music hasn't stood the test of time. Ask the Reverend Horton Heat if Elvis' music hasn't influenced them and allowed them to tour the world for the past 30 years playing rockabilly songs.

It ain't all old dudes that listen to Elvis. His music is as relevant today as it has ever been.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 10, 2014 at 09:45 UTC
On Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art Lab Test Review preview (555 comments in total)
In reply to:

starwolfy: Nothing beats a leica summilux f1.4 asph.
Cheaper than an Otus, way smaller and way lighter than both Otus and this Sigma lens. The only thing this Sigma has for it is better value per dollar and autofocus. Its a very good lens but I still cannot accept weight a size compromises you have to make to enter dslr world. The biggest joke is when u compare an Othus to the Leica Lux...it looks like a serious joke from size.

How about professional boxers from ringside about a meter away? You think those guys are predictable? Less than 3 seconds my man. DONE IT. How about BMX and skateboarding? Done that too.

Also just to clarify, I don't sit in the stands when I shoot MotoGP. I'm 15-20 feet away on the infield track.

Seriously dude. Maybe YOU can't hack it, but some of us can.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 10, 2014 at 09:29 UTC
In reply to:

Robgo2: The covers of "Abbey Road" and "Sgt. Pepper" are almost certainly the most famous in the history of recorded music and are fitting icons for some of the greatest pop music ever.

@Robgo2: If it wasn't for Elvis there would be no Beatles. Elvis introduced rockabilly to the world and the Beatles were basically a rockabilly cover band in the early years.

If you think Elvis' music hasn't stood the test of time you're gravely mistaken. So much of today's rock and roll and country is influenced by the rockabilly sound that Elvis, Scotty Moore and Bill Black helped create.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 10, 2014 at 01:33 UTC
In reply to:

Valant: I recall buying this album on the Saturday after its release and playing I want you (she's so heavy) over and over..The late great John Peel had played it in his radio show the evening before: I had to get it. The cover seemed to reflect and sum up something of the feelling of the previous 6 years and the end of an ERA.
For the annalists:
Significantly, Paul (or the stand-in) is the only Beatle on the shot not wearing flares and his cigarette is pointing downwards, the joker is laughing at him!! and not at the other 3. However it may not be a stand-in. Look at Paul.
The left hand side of his suit Jacket appears to be being blown aside whilst the jackets of Ringo and John remain unruffled or blow backwards: Obviousy a manipulated image. How did they do that without P.S.?
28 if and all that.

Abbey Road conspiracy theory?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 10, 2014 at 01:27 UTC
On LensRentals looks into the Canon EF 16-35 f/4 IS article (61 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael Piziak: Looks like a lot of electronic parts to break down.

@ marc petzold: That 10 symbol is for China only. It doesn't mean that it's a 10 year life span. It means that for 10 years the lens is certified RoHS compliant and that no toxic chemicals will be discharged for at least 10 years.

@johnsmith404: Yeah it's a big deal. I paid for a AF lens. If I wanted a MF lens I'd buy one. Focusing screens on today's DSLR cameras are abysmal for manually focusing. I use my 16-35 primarily for nighttime event shooting and trying to accurately manual focus in those conditions is pointless. I need the AF to lock on quickly so people aren't standing around waiting for me to be sure the focus is good.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 9, 2014 at 18:49 UTC
On LensRentals looks into the Canon EF 16-35 f/4 IS article (61 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael Piziak: Looks like a lot of electronic parts to break down.

These new lenses won't last a lifetime even in comparison to AF lenses made 10-15 years ago. The RoHS compliant lead-free solder they now use puts a more finite life on even the most expensive lenses. The lead-free solder grows tin whiskers that short out circuitry and the solder joints also weaken and lose connection. The average amount of time before the tin whiskers cause a problem is about 10 years. It's not an automatic death sentence, but the probability if your lens failing is much more prevalent. Lenses aren't really the lifetime purchase that they used to be. Unless of course you buy a non-CPU MF lens such as a Leica.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 9, 2014 at 05:26 UTC
On Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art Lab Test Review preview (555 comments in total)
In reply to:

starwolfy: Nothing beats a leica summilux f1.4 asph.
Cheaper than an Otus, way smaller and way lighter than both Otus and this Sigma lens. The only thing this Sigma has for it is better value per dollar and autofocus. Its a very good lens but I still cannot accept weight a size compromises you have to make to enter dslr world. The biggest joke is when u compare an Othus to the Leica Lux...it looks like a serious joke from size.

"but otherwise, good luck focusing manually on fast moving subjects..."

I always laugh when i read things like this. I shoot fast moving musicians using a manual focus Summilux all the time. I've also shot sports such as boxing and even sport bike racing (200+mph) using a manual focus lens.

Sorry to break this to you, but it's not luck, it's skill.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 6, 2014 at 16:07 UTC
In reply to:

misha marinsky4: "The Master" was shot using Kodak 65mm.

The problem is this: No one makes cine cameras any longer. Eventually, there will not be any parts when one needs repairs. That's less than 10 years away.

With quantum advances in raw exposure, PP becomes easier each year. Cinema DNG is one example. Black Magic is giving Red stiff competition.

Readers' thoughts?

@AprilW:

The classic photographer use of the "hipster" derision shows that you don't even know what a hipster is. Steampunk is the polar opposite of hipster. Steampunks are nerds. Hipsters are the "cool" kids.

If you're going to go around maligning certain types of people at least know what you're talking about.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 4, 2014 at 21:52 UTC
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