brumd

brumd

Lives in Netherlands Netherlands
Works as a Web developer
Joined on Feb 8, 2012

Comments

Total: 151, showing: 1 – 20
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I totally want to believe this VR hype thing. This app isn't helping.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2016 at 09:52 UTC as 8th comment
On article Sand and sky: Photographing Morocco (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

brumd: My last trip to an islamic country before I visited Morocco in 2013 was to Iran and the Kurdic part of Turkey. And the contrast couldn't have been bigger in terms of willingness of people to be included in a picture. Both in Iran and in Turkey the majority of people are very happy to go on a picture, men and women alike. Quite a few people actively request you to take their picture.

Although in touristy Marrakech some people don't object, I encountered quite a bit of anger, and it wasn't until I got home that I noticed how many more people were hiding their faces.
In the mountains (I hiked the Jebel Saghro), things were more extreme. A shepherd - who I hadn't even seen - came runnning from a kilometer away waving his arms.

Of course, I respect local culture, but I found this experience so frustrating, I decided that it's unlikely I will ever return.

My pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/beefortytwo/albums/72157633617615291

BTW: the sand dunes are not the 'typical' Moroccan landscape, they can only be found at 2 relatively small areas: Erg Chebbi and Erg Chigaga. Both are very popular. It is adviced to make your trip arrangements before you arrive there in order to keep prices down a bit.

More and bigger sand deserts can be found in other North African countries, but many of those are less easy to reach. In the past you could make longer trips in The Great Sand Desert from Siwa in Egypt (close to Libya), but in current years this has become less feasible, if even possible (it requires a lot of permits/red tape).
Too bad, because a 2-3 week desert tour - with sand, sand and more sand - is the trip I would love to make.

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2016 at 14:53 UTC
On article Sand and sky: Photographing Morocco (49 comments in total)

My last trip to an islamic country before I visited Morocco in 2013 was to Iran and the Kurdic part of Turkey. And the contrast couldn't have been bigger in terms of willingness of people to be included in a picture. Both in Iran and in Turkey the majority of people are very happy to go on a picture, men and women alike. Quite a few people actively request you to take their picture.

Although in touristy Marrakech some people don't object, I encountered quite a bit of anger, and it wasn't until I got home that I noticed how many more people were hiding their faces.
In the mountains (I hiked the Jebel Saghro), things were more extreme. A shepherd - who I hadn't even seen - came runnning from a kilometer away waving his arms.

Of course, I respect local culture, but I found this experience so frustrating, I decided that it's unlikely I will ever return.

My pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/beefortytwo/albums/72157633617615291

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2016 at 14:27 UTC as 6th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

PWPhotography: When content-aware fill and crop will become available in Lightroom?

Probably never.
None of the edits in Lightroom transform the actual image. Not even the Spot Removal tool. Maybe in a far future when CPUs are much much more powerful. Until then: this is the realm of Photoshop (or another editor that transforms pixels in the actual image-file)

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 20:26 UTC

The comments are predictable, but I really like this concept. With this pricing there is no need to seriously consider owning it; I never will.
If a company like Fujifilm would ever make a sort of a similarly stripped down X100, I'd be very interested.
Make it so!

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2016 at 06:04 UTC as 179th comment
In reply to:

ecm: Wouldn't the sensor need to be re-calibrated for flat plane and rotation if you took it off it's mount like that? How would you do such a thing without specialized testing equipment?

The host site's name is "Ifixit" - does Panasonic even sell parts to the general public to repair a camera like this by yourself?

Other than "Ooooh, that's cool!" is there really a reason to do this? Guess I don't get it.....

Like "Ooooh, that's cool!" isn't enough reason by itself..
;)

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2016 at 16:50 UTC
On article Beta: try out our new 'light' color scheme (722 comments in total)

Black on white, white on black. There seems to be a group of commenters for which it doesn't matter much: apparently they can't read regardless. :)

For those who missed it: no need for drama, or 'threats'. The new colour scheme is an EXTRA OPTION. Don't like it? Don't use it. So simple.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2016 at 10:28 UTC as 350th comment
On article Beta: try out our new 'light' color scheme (722 comments in total)
In reply to:

Raafje: The switch isn't working in the Netherlands.
And reporting this bug isn't possible..

I am in The Netherlands, and the switch works fine for me.

And wow, this is a relief! *like*

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2016 at 20:57 UTC
On article Nikon D5 real-world low light, high ISO samples (281 comments in total)
In reply to:

Obies1: It would be very interesting to see DPreview shoot the same event with two very different cameras to demonstrate the difference between the "best" low light option (e.g., D5) and a micro 4/3 option or a 1-inch sensor option. That type of comparison may seem like folly, but it might also be quite revealing. I am often very impressed with the quality of low-light photo that I can achieve with a camera as inexpensive as the Nikon P7700. Same-event "real life" photos by DPreview staff could potentially be very informative for people trying to decide between a DSLR, a micro 4/3, and a 1-inch sensor camera for their next purchase.

Concert photographer & m4/3 owner here (and a Nikon Df).
Using my OM-D E-M5 w/ f1.8 prime lenses (mostly 45mm and 75mm) I am confident I can achieve the same quality of pics that is demonstrated here. Of course, I leave my lenses wide open (or 1 stop down) and lower my shutter speed to more sensible values (~1/100). At a venue like this that usually means shooting in the ISO800-3200 range.
T
he examples in this gallery aren't really of any practical value here; I would have loved to see how well this D5 performs when using more realistic camera settings.

The things you - probably - can do with this camera, and which I can't do with my m4/3 is taking pictures of the listening crowd. My clients often ask me to do that, and that's where I struggle. That's where you actually need these +51200 ISO values. It's a missed opportunity.

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2016 at 18:56 UTC
In reply to:

rrccad: I don't know.. Walking around with a $1000 compact in most places of the world is simply a bad idea.

IMO that's not exactly "real world".. I'd choose the lx100 for that reason, or even the tough, or an older rx100 before the IVor the more flashy expensive looking x100t..

A good travel cam should not scream .. Steal me.

ah, "in most places of the world"..

With comments like these, I always wonder where these places might be.
Last couple of years I walked around with >$3000 worth of camera gear in Greece, Portugal, Eastern Turkey, Armenia, Nagorno-Karabagh, Iran, Albania, Kosovo, Morocco, Egypt, Scandinavia, Belarus, and many more. Big cities, 'bad neughobourhoods', remote countryside.

Never ever I found myself in a situation where I thought: 'if only I had a cheaper camera I would be so much safer'.

Don't live your life in fear. Screaming 'steal me' is never about the price of the camera, but the way you walk with it.

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2015 at 13:55 UTC

The main problem of this gadget is that it is only pocketable when you detach it from your phone, meaning every time you want to snap a picture, you have to assemble the two parts, switch them both on (for which both batteries need to work), start the app, and then you have your combo that doesn't even have remotely the ergonomics of a 'real' compact camera.

With plenty of hi quality, very pocketable cameras with built-in wif available, this phone gadget is an awkward choice. I wonder how many of the few that fall for this thing will actually use it after a couple of months.

I bet this thing will feature a lot of 'Silly inventions of the 2010s: what were they thinking?' articles in the not so distant future.

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2015 at 17:34 UTC as 4th comment
In reply to:

falconeyes: Another Lightroom without the raw conversion. Why do we need this?
Why couldn't Alien Skin improve on their core competence which is Special Effects?

" Why do we need this?"
Because it is not unthinkable that soon Lr will be subscription based only, so many of us are looking for alternatives.
I will definitely try it out. The less dependent on Adobe I am, the better it is.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2015 at 13:15 UTC
On article Sony Alpha 7R II Review (2157 comments in total)
In reply to:

JakeB: I would never buy such an ugly looking camera.

"Who cares about what the camera looks like"

I do. Very much so. Cameras are about so much more than 'the image'. It's a tool that I work with almost everyday, and it matters if I *love* to take it out on the streets. It's how it works for me. So many cameras that have sufficient IQ for my needs and wishes.
Inspiration & creativity are the bottlenecks in 2015, not IQ. If my camera inspires me, than that's a big bonus.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 18:46 UTC
On article Sony Alpha 7R II Review (2157 comments in total)
In reply to:

JakeB: I would never buy such an ugly looking camera.

No need for a Leica. There are plenty of brands that make cameras which looks I love, e.g.: Pentax, Fujifilm, Olympus, my Nikon Df. I like both 'classic' looks, as well as modern more 'unusual' design. It has to make a statement. In my opinion, Sony cameras don't do that. At least, no statement that appeals to me. It's just very plain and dull.
When buying a car, there too is a pricepoint after which you expect it to *look* good, even though most people use it for driving and mostly sit on the inside.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 16:38 UTC
On article Sony Alpha 7R II Review (2157 comments in total)
In reply to:

JakeB: I would never buy such an ugly looking camera.

I'm with you, JakeB.

One of my reasons to not seriously consider a Sony-FF system is the look of the cameras. They just don't look the way I'd expect an expensive camera to look.
I like walking around proudly with a camera that people notice and comment upon; they mistake me for a creative artyfarty person, hence they give me more credit. That motivates me to try harder to get the most out of a situation.

I want a €3000 machine to look like a €3000 machine. Sony cameras could look so much sexier. Employing one good desiger could make the difference.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 14:48 UTC
In reply to:

dagobah: The G5X looks like a formidably sharp camera - wow! At all ISOs superior to other 1" sensor compacts.

The G9X not quite as sharp, but similar to the older model G7X at base ISO. However, the G9X gets far noisier as ISO increases. To my eyes G9X is superior to Sony RX100 mk 1,2,3,4 at base ISO but things go downhill and the Sonys look superior somewhere between ISO800 and ISO1600.

Despite the similarities of the sensor on paper, the electronics must be quite different between G5X and G9X.

"the electronics must be quite different between G5X and G9X."

..and the lens.

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2015 at 21:49 UTC
On article 2015 Roundups: Fixed Prime Lens Cameras (231 comments in total)
In reply to:

User9362470513: The Sigma Merrill cameras are probably the best value prime lens cameras available. The Foveon sensors are amazing quality and have to be seen to be believed.

<100 shots per battery, camera freezes for ~5sec to write a single RAW, RAWs can only be processed with poorly implemented Sigma software, no viewfinder, very limited DR compared to other APS-C cameras, IQ is only impressive at ISO100-200.

These Merrills have so many shortcomings. I thought I could live them, but soon I realized, this camera was way to frustrating to use, even as a 2nd camera.
It's the one purchase that I really regret, my DP1 Merrill. The Quattro has some improvements, but still, in every aspect they fall back behind the competition, except for that one thing: the IQ at base ISO (under the right circumstances).

"Best value"? No way.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2015 at 14:42 UTC
On article 2015 Roundups: Fixed Prime Lens Cameras (231 comments in total)
In reply to:

MarcMedios: I fail to see the allure. Buying a quality point and shoot is still buying a point & shoot. Bottom line, you have a lens that some anonymous engineer decided for you, can't change it, can't zoom in, change your framing... seems like a self-defeating thing to do.

All the cameras in this roundup have full manual controls and are therefore not 'a point & shoot'. P&S refers to fully automated settings.

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2015 at 18:21 UTC
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (748 comments in total)
In reply to:

qwertyasdf: Fairly speaking, Canon and Panasonic mirrorlesses have decent battery life, Sony's bad, and Olympus is absolutely miserable (less than 200 shots per charge on EM5, IBIS off)

I want to suggest something out of the ordinary, how about a collapsible telephoto lens to keep everything small?! Since telephotos really have a lot of air space in them.

Since the picture is showing a Fuji camera, I'm particularly disappointed with them, why the heck are their lenses becoming bigger and bigger?!?!?! I love Fuji, but stopped with the X-A1 and 18--55mm F2.8-4, I have no desire to buy any of their huge lenses.

"and Olympus is absolutely miserable (less than 200 shots per charge on EM5, IBIS off"

Either there is something wrong with your battery, or, you use the plug-in flash for every shot, but this is definitely not right. I easily get 600 shots, using a $7 chinese battery. In burst mode, during concerts, it is not unusual to get over 1500 out of a battery.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2015 at 17:41 UTC
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (748 comments in total)
In reply to:

justmeMN: In the USA, what mirrorless is missing is many buyers. :-)

Just observe the groups of japanese and chinese tourists, and compare the cameras today with, let's say, 5 years ago. Undeniably, there is a huge difference.
Mirrorless camera systems are viable options for more and more people. It won't change back.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2015 at 16:28 UTC
Total: 151, showing: 1 – 20
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