jkjond

jkjond

Lives in United Kingdom Lake District, United Kingdom
Works as a Graphic Designer/wedding & landscape photographer
Joined on Nov 3, 2004
About me:

Wedding photographer based in Grange over Sands in the Lake District, northwest England, covering events throughout the UK and abroad. Creative fine art landscapes at www.johnleechstudio.smugmug.com

Comments

Total: 10, showing: 1 – 10
On UK Landscape Photographer of the Year winners announced article (159 comments in total)
In reply to:

jkjond: Excellent winner this year. It is encouraging to see this competition is maturing above the predictable winners of yesteryear.

Nope, but I'm a photographer who gets no joy out of replicating what has been before or seeing yet another variation on a well tried and tested theme.

For me, the winning photo has a sense of interpretation yet retains a feeling of location and reality. For those who like the predictable same old shot of the same old location in the same old goldenhour light, with the same old sprinkling of frost on the ground - I can see but not share your grief.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 25, 2014 at 17:36 UTC
On UK Landscape Photographer of the Year winners announced article (159 comments in total)

Excellent winner this year. It is encouraging to see this competition is maturing above the predictable winners of yesteryear.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 19, 2014 at 11:25 UTC as 3rd comment | 2 replies

Tights on the end of a lens? I've never heard such rubbish.

Everyone knows you MUST use stockings.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 15, 2014 at 07:53 UTC as 5th comment

good to see an original piece of work winning big money... though the work looks interesting, I'm left thinking the theme of the comp was copyright abuse or nobody else entered.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 12, 2013 at 16:34 UTC as 1st comment
On Compositional Rules article (120 comments in total)
In reply to:

InTheMist: Too much focus on gear here. Composition always welcome and well done! I hope for much more.

Good point

Direct link | Posted on Aug 24, 2012 at 08:03 UTC
On Compositional Rules article (120 comments in total)
In reply to:

jkjond: Proscriptive composition? Is that the real deal?

All too many articles about composition fall back on the same old principles, crazily referred to as rules. It genuinely saddens me. Composition is a creative thinking process, not a database driven procedure straight jacketing subjects to fit a mould. People end up believing this stuff - not only using it to control their own shots, but applying it to their enjoyment of other images.

Forget the articles - concentrate on your subject and its environment and enjoy a little creativity and freedom.

"What are you going to do today Brian?"
"I'm going to take a creative photograph by placing my subject on the thirds intersection"

I can't wait.

Well history has a habit of reshaping a few things. Same with art, such as the touch up work on the Sistine Chapel ceiling which they think they have now corrected. Photos have a habit of being recropped over time or reprocessed, losing the photographers original expression. Sometimes by necessity such as AA's damaged negs following a darkroom fire.

Music - strange area. How many musicians actually compose and perform their own work? Its an area where reproducing the original is often a goal.

But in photography, I'd rather see people putting their own spin on their work, not reproducing successful shots and copying compositions. A lack of personal expression.

Education stifles creativity.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 23, 2012 at 10:16 UTC
On Compositional Rules article (120 comments in total)
In reply to:

jkjond: Proscriptive composition? Is that the real deal?

All too many articles about composition fall back on the same old principles, crazily referred to as rules. It genuinely saddens me. Composition is a creative thinking process, not a database driven procedure straight jacketing subjects to fit a mould. People end up believing this stuff - not only using it to control their own shots, but applying it to their enjoyment of other images.

Forget the articles - concentrate on your subject and its environment and enjoy a little creativity and freedom.

"What are you going to do today Brian?"
"I'm going to take a creative photograph by placing my subject on the thirds intersection"

I can't wait.

I'm well aware of Picasso's talents but try to avoid Kandinsky. I far rather see Turner as an example of breaking free of the shackles of the art establishment. Back in the old days, before Turner, nobody managed to shake the establishement's views and rules, and they were non too pleased that Turner opened peoples eyes.

What bothers me about the established rules of communication is that some people have no facility for them. There are some people with little grasp of formal grammar, but who have a lot to say that deserves to be heard. Why should rules hold them back? Lets ignore everyone from the third world who has no grasp of the written word, what could they bring to the table anyway?

No, I'm not saying grammar has no place, but ignorance is preferable to arrogance when it comes to rules.

There is often a passion from people with no knowledge of rules that isn't expressed by those who know it all.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2012 at 10:21 UTC
On Compositional Rules article (120 comments in total)
In reply to:

jkjond: Proscriptive composition? Is that the real deal?

All too many articles about composition fall back on the same old principles, crazily referred to as rules. It genuinely saddens me. Composition is a creative thinking process, not a database driven procedure straight jacketing subjects to fit a mould. People end up believing this stuff - not only using it to control their own shots, but applying it to their enjoyment of other images.

Forget the articles - concentrate on your subject and its environment and enjoy a little creativity and freedom.

"What are you going to do today Brian?"
"I'm going to take a creative photograph by placing my subject on the thirds intersection"

I can't wait.

What, look forward to the next thrilling instalment - breaking the rules? Excuse the sarcasm, but 'A guide in how to break the rules' isn't gripping me.

I personally think that no rules should ever be mentioned. There are a host of principles that are worthy of discussion, and there's no doubting s-curves have an attraction.

But I'll give Thomas a whirl and look at how he approaches how to break rules - and how knowledge of the rules is so important to achieve this goal.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2012 at 09:38 UTC
On Compositional Rules article (120 comments in total)
In reply to:

Camediadude: Thank you for the well illustrated article. I definitely appreciate the concepts of various "compositional aids" and arrangements, but it's just the act of calling them "rules" that has always irked me some! I mean not to minimise the effectiveness of it all, for I recognise that these "guidelines" (a name which I prefer!) have long been used to devastating effects by the giants of photography, for decades and by painter legends for centuries before that. Perhaps it is just semantics.. (Rules, at least those which do Not pertain to the keeping of some from harming others, often tend to rub me the wrong way! But that is personality-based mainly, from what I can tell.)

Two very different forms of communication - though there is some very enjoyable and creative written word that shuns conventional grammar. Note that grammar is constantly evolving, you don't get many articles on the use of grammar that resort to quoting Aristotle, though all too many which insist that infinitives should always be touching.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2012 at 08:49 UTC
On Compositional Rules article (120 comments in total)

Proscriptive composition? Is that the real deal?

All too many articles about composition fall back on the same old principles, crazily referred to as rules. It genuinely saddens me. Composition is a creative thinking process, not a database driven procedure straight jacketing subjects to fit a mould. People end up believing this stuff - not only using it to control their own shots, but applying it to their enjoyment of other images.

Forget the articles - concentrate on your subject and its environment and enjoy a little creativity and freedom.

"What are you going to do today Brian?"
"I'm going to take a creative photograph by placing my subject on the thirds intersection"

I can't wait.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2012 at 08:39 UTC as 20th comment | 7 replies
Total: 10, showing: 1 – 10