maico

Joined on Nov 1, 2011

Comments

Total: 34, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »
In reply to:

Tical: Lenses are manufactured by Nittoh, sensor is manufactured by Sony, flash system is manufactured by Nikon, why the hell it is called a Hasselblad is beyond me.

OT. The Bentley V8 engine is an update of the traditional Bentley V8. It's made in England. The W12 is the German design although, as I understand it, the production base for these was moved to England.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2016 at 17:07 UTC
In reply to:

Tical: Lenses are manufactured by Nittoh, sensor is manufactured by Sony, flash system is manufactured by Nikon, why the hell it is called a Hasselblad is beyond me.

Hasselblad have never made lenses or flashes

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2016 at 17:02 UTC
In reply to:

maico: In another thread I said the Fujifilm Tx-1 I used to own ( sold as the Hasselblad x-pan in most markets) had Fuji made lenses. Well clearly I was wrong, they were made by Nittoh.
The optical and mechanical quality was certainly superb.

link https://www.nittohkogaku.co.jp/en/

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2016 at 16:48 UTC

In another thread I said the Fujifilm Tx-1 I used to own ( sold as the Hasselblad x-pan in most markets) had Fuji made lenses. Well clearly I was wrong, they were made by Nittoh.
The optical and mechanical quality was certainly superb.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2016 at 16:45 UTC as 7th comment | 1 reply
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1980 comments in total)
In reply to:

Reality Check: It looks like it is time for DPR to separate a few areas of 'scoring' to their own rank..
Specifically: Build Quality - Where you have the D810 rate higher than any camera in its category, when in reality is inferior to most, including its predecessors.
It looks like DPR's assessment of build quality rests solely on whether the manufacturer says it is weather sealed.. Which is important, especially at this level, but an egg is also weather sealed and yet not capable of withstanding short drop or impact.
Since the D7000 (continuing to the D600 series, D750, and the latest D500) Nikon no longer makes magnesium body cameras below the single digit 'Pro' bodies. Everything in Nikon's stable is now their {monocoque} design of 'shielded' plastic internals. The D810 does include a bottom plate, but the remaining front is 'engineered' plastic - including the material the lens flange is mounted to.
Other manufacturers at least encase the plastic internals between front/back plating, and more.

Do you have a link showing the D810 mirror box that the mount flange attaches to ? The D800 one is metal. The Canon 5D II is plastic. See the excellent parts photos on fixyourcamera.org

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 17:55 UTC
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1980 comments in total)
In reply to:

Reality Check: It looks like it is time for DPR to separate a few areas of 'scoring' to their own rank..
Specifically: Build Quality - Where you have the D810 rate higher than any camera in its category, when in reality is inferior to most, including its predecessors.
It looks like DPR's assessment of build quality rests solely on whether the manufacturer says it is weather sealed.. Which is important, especially at this level, but an egg is also weather sealed and yet not capable of withstanding short drop or impact.
Since the D7000 (continuing to the D600 series, D750, and the latest D500) Nikon no longer makes magnesium body cameras below the single digit 'Pro' bodies. Everything in Nikon's stable is now their {monocoque} design of 'shielded' plastic internals. The D810 does include a bottom plate, but the remaining front is 'engineered' plastic - including the material the lens flange is mounted to.
Other manufacturers at least encase the plastic internals between front/back plating, and more.

On fixyourcamera.org there are detailed photos of a striped down D800 showing the magnesium mirror box the mount is screwed to, and the magnesium main frame. The front cover and component parts appear to be plastic though just like the D810 ? Take a look.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 17:47 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1189 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marksphoto: that's a thin body, I had to wonder... This isn't a true medium format camera, make no mistake, my 5dmk2 will make the same image quality and I don't know whose images will look better at a pixel peeping level...

True medium format is 60mm x 45mm, I think Hassy should be 60mm x 60mm so they keep true to their marketing values. So what do we have instead.... a 44x33mm sensor; how does that compare in size to 36x24mm that most of us already have?

So I made a sensor comparison chart here: https://photos.google.com/search/_tra_/photo/AF1QipNF1V4qJeB95tYIwYlkryp6nNMFXT2BU9isJgCq

Judging that this sensor is not that much bigger than the 35mm full frame sensor we could really get away with the same or better results by just adding any sigma art lens with a fast apperture of 1.4 and call it a day!

I suppose it depends on your definition of ''not that much bigger''
1452 mm sq. vs 864 mm sq.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 14:07 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1189 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marksphoto: that's a thin body, I had to wonder... This isn't a true medium format camera, make no mistake, my 5dmk2 will make the same image quality and I don't know whose images will look better at a pixel peeping level...

True medium format is 60mm x 45mm, I think Hassy should be 60mm x 60mm so they keep true to their marketing values. So what do we have instead.... a 44x33mm sensor; how does that compare in size to 36x24mm that most of us already have?

So I made a sensor comparison chart here: https://photos.google.com/search/_tra_/photo/AF1QipNF1V4qJeB95tYIwYlkryp6nNMFXT2BU9isJgCq

Judging that this sensor is not that much bigger than the 35mm full frame sensor we could really get away with the same or better results by just adding any sigma art lens with a fast apperture of 1.4 and call it a day!

56mm x 56mm was the traditional Hasselblad size

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 13:56 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1189 comments in total)
In reply to:

One_Oldman_4U: Great camera. There will be several people out there will be considering this for portrait/landscape, etc.

Even though I will not be purchasing one of this (well, who knows), I love the bigger format as I used to shoot the 500CM back in the 80's. Nothing better. Now that this format is becoming more affordable, hopefully the "FF equivalency" crap that seems to keep popping up like mushrooms every time a new body or lens will eventually dissipates (doubt it).

Maybe Mamiya, Bronica and the rest of the MF players can come out with their version at an affordable price will be great. More choices, better prices. A lot FF users might be interested. Of course some good lenses too.

Bronica ceased production 11 years ago and the owners Tamron have presumably phased the name out.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 13:45 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1189 comments in total)
In reply to:

Zvonimir Tosic: The only objection is the name of the camera: X1D? X and D are two notorious letters of the digital photography world, everyone is using them, and all those X and D names create enormous confusion.

I used to have a Fuji TX1. It's engraved Fujifilm on the body. They made the Hasselblad X-pan so logic might suggest a Fuji version of this camera will be available in Japan too.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 13:38 UTC
On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (1086 comments in total)
In reply to:

Electricturd: The chart comparing the 3 different cameras states that the D7200 is Carbon Composite only. Thats wrong, its external body has the same materials as the D500 (Mag top and back, Carbon front)

Are the plastics in the D7200 carbon composite like the D750 chassis, I've seen no reference to it ?

Link | Posted on May 18, 2016 at 00:55 UTC
On article The effect of pixel size on noise (81 comments in total)

I'd be interested to know what Richard Butler thinks of this Youtube video ?
It seems to be specifically stating a bigger sensor area does not gather more total light...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnAN0nWef-I

Link | Posted on May 18, 2016 at 00:00 UTC as 3rd comment | 4 replies
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1980 comments in total)
In reply to:

maico: On page 15 of the review it says "Think of it like this: the extra light the 645Z can capture - due its ~66% greater sensor surface area...."
I don't understand why a larger surface area gets more light ?
If I shoot with a 4x5" plate camera and then mount a 6x9 roll film back on it the intensity of light per sq.mm is the same. Only a larger diameter lens will increase the light gathered.
On digital is it not the larger sensor sites on the Pentax 645 capturing more light. The larger wells rather than the total surface area increase ?

I'm working my way through the Richard Butler articles Rishi linked in his reply. There is a lot to get through !

Link | Posted on May 17, 2016 at 17:32 UTC
On article Benchmark Performance: Nikon D810 review (1980 comments in total)

On page 15 of the review it says "Think of it like this: the extra light the 645Z can capture - due its ~66% greater sensor surface area...."
I don't understand why a larger surface area gets more light ?
If I shoot with a 4x5" plate camera and then mount a 6x9 roll film back on it the intensity of light per sq.mm is the same. Only a larger diameter lens will increase the light gathered.
On digital is it not the larger sensor sites on the Pentax 645 capturing more light. The larger wells rather than the total surface area increase ?

Link | Posted on May 16, 2016 at 18:45 UTC as 47th comment | 14 replies
In reply to:

WastingTime: Can someone explain the ISO invariance thing like I'm a two-year old? I mean, I understand what they are doing, but I keep seeing that the high iso files are better than the digitally corrected file, so what's the point on using this method instead of just increasing the ISO?

Watch this video about exposing for the highlights and bringing deep shadows back up in post without loosing quality 15.34 min
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSCVRsaNx5c

Link | Posted on May 9, 2016 at 15:32 UTC
On article Video: Meet the Nikon D500 (187 comments in total)

What is the lens shown at 1.35 min , the 70-200 f2.8 ?

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2016 at 19:16 UTC as 29th comment | 1 reply

Arriviste nonsense. Daguerreotypist like me still shoot on silver-plated copper plates.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2016 at 18:53 UTC as 286th comment
In reply to:

Ansel Spear: Why do some of you across The Pond insist on referring to lenses and bodies as 'copies' of lenses and bodies?

They are not copies of lenses and bodies. They ARE lenses and bodies in their own, original, genuine bona fide right.

There isn't a 'master' lens or body from which all others are copies. You don't buy a copy of a car or a copy of a can of beans, so why a lens or a body.

Not that I feel strongly about it! :-)

Variability seems to come into it. For example, the leather used on my jacket may differ to the same jacket cut from a different batch of hides. In doing a comparison saying 'my copy' is certainly accepted usage. It is not a clone. Lenses seem to have quite large QC variability if you look at the data on lensrentals.com

Link | Posted on Apr 22, 2016 at 15:12 UTC
In reply to:

akophoto: I agree with alexandros. ND grads are old hat and a waste of money.

Lee are going to see their sales disappear and eventually they will disappear too.

Reasons not to buy...
1:You are essentially shooting through a thick sheet of plastic.
2: They have to be squeeky clean and scratch free.
3: They are a pain to use in the cold
4: You need numerous stops to match sky and foreground and then you need hard and soft edge and now they want to sell you even harder edge grads on top!
5:$$$$£££ wasted. £80 each in the UK!
6. The biggest problem. You have a landscape that reaches into the sky. (top of mountain or in my case the highest church above sea level in the UK, (Google Brentor Church) The church goes black even with the soft edge.. Completely correctable and quickly in Photoshop.

See post above to continue

Disappear ? They are widely used in the film industry. They aren't made of plastic.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2016 at 15:40 UTC
On article Nikon D5 real-world low light, high ISO samples (281 comments in total)
In reply to:

Robert Garcia NYC: That sensor coming to a Sony AXX near you. :)

The Japanese company Renesas make the Nikon flagship sensors.

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2016 at 10:56 UTC
Total: 34, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »