Neimo

Neimo

Lives in United States Bay Area, CA, United States
Has a website at www.alterpersanium.com
Joined on Nov 29, 2006

Comments

Total: 29, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »
In reply to:

RichRMA: I find many of these wide DR images are lifeless, flat and lacking in dynamics. If blacking out some shadows results in a more dynamic, engaging image, why go HDR?
As for Rambus, things aren't that pretty right now.

http://hothardware.com/News/Third-Most-Important-Rambus-Patent-Invalidated-Company-Share-Price-Craters/

OLED has tremendous dynamic range and more displays with it are becoming available. If it becomes popular enough, some folks will use it to reproduce high contrast scenes better. It'll be nice to have that data in photos we take today or next year.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 1, 2013 at 09:25 UTC

Is the minimum shutter speed of 30 seconds still only for ISO 100?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 7, 2013 at 21:24 UTC as 15th comment
In reply to:

RRJackson: Why do people always insist on zoom lenses? Why can't anyone be happy with primes?

Because wildlife or people don't always wait around while changing lenses.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 25, 2012 at 07:43 UTC
On Nikon Coolpix S800c Android camera first look article (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

b534202: Why didn't Nikon put a phone in it too? You don't need the modem for data connectivity for 3G/4G for a 1st gen product, but at least make it so it can make a phone call in order for someone to actually think about carrying this as the sole gadget on the go.

Then it needs a much larger battery, baseband chip, antenna (with good reception), microphone located where people talk into it, SIM card reader, more powerful CPU to run Android 4.0/4.1, and more RAM. All that adds quite a lot to the price. It stops being an enhanced P&S camera with a comparable price and instead costs $100 or $200 more and is competing with other phones, but carriers won't be willing to subsidize it so it costs five or six hundred dollars.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2012 at 22:35 UTC
On Nikon Coolpix S800c Android camera first look article (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

Reg Natarajan: I love the idea. When I saw the headline, I mentally thought, "Sold!" Then I read a bit more. Android 2.3? Are they serious? Someone tell Nikon that Android 2.3 was released in 2010, and they're on 4.1 now.

2.3 can run smoothly with a processor that uses less battery compared to 4 and 4.1. Camera batteries have been lower capacity than smartphones for years. Nikon evidently wasn't ready to drastically re-engineer the guts of the camera to fit a large, flat smartphone battery.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2012 at 22:27 UTC
On Canon EOS M Preview preview (551 comments in total)
In reply to:

Johnderock: What you fail to understand is the deadly competition from mobile phones.
P&S camera are dead, finished.
90% of all pix in he world are taken with excellent 5 or 8MP phones.
No one is going to buy a low end camera any more.
So the photo industry has to move upward, hence those bizarre formats like m4/3 or 1" and others. And those super long "travel zooms"
The industry is only buying time
Because we know the end of the story: for 90% of the users, the camera is in the phone.
Sorry

There are lots of 10 to 15x P&S models that are about an inch thick. Those are selling well and phones won't do that any time soon. Just because 4x P&S cameras are finished doesn't mean the longer zoom ones are too.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2012 at 11:50 UTC
In reply to:

Timmbits: I feel very disappointed.
The tiny sensor leaves it stuck in the past when we were led to believe that a 1/1.7" might be a big improvement over the tiniest of sensors. The hotshoe is way out of the league that the smaller sensor puts it in.
And the looks... they've actually managed to take an awesome retro-like design, and make it look _modest_! What's next, copying the s100 design on the next model? They are aware that all the designers at Canon had quit, and that is the only reason the canon models went to market in their pre-production test model casing, right? (because that is definitely what it looks like happened over at canon, yet everyone's stupid enough to want to imitate them)

malcolm, on a 4x3mm consumer camera, resolution isn't as important as noise to the general public. They want pictures that look good when resized to fit a screen. That means all they really need are 3MP of un-smeared, un-watercolor-looking detail. Give those people a camera that can use ISO 400 instead of 1600 and they'll be happy with the results.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 19, 2012 at 01:30 UTC
In reply to:

Absolutic: the samples are quite impressive, especially low light at ISO1600 and 3200. If you recall, high ISO above 200 was not LX3's strongest forte. In fact it sucked above ISO400, but because of bright F/2.0 lens, we did not have to resort to high ISO many times. This time, ISO1600 looks remarkable and ISO3200 not bad! ANd the lens is brighter! Panasonic must be doing some clever noise reduction at high isos. On the other hand they resisted increasing MPs and left it at 10MP, which maybe a blessing and a curse. A blessing because they can afford to again include a small sensor. A curse because people will be questioning this decision, in fact, are there are current DSLR or Point and Shoot in production with that low of MPs?

The Fujifilm X10 is 12MP, but the fantastic low light mode is 6MP.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 18, 2012 at 10:02 UTC
On Just posted: Fujifilm X10 in-depth review article (155 comments in total)
In reply to:

Neimo: I'm glad the review noted the grey bar on the screen. I really want to turn that off for composing in 1:1 and 4:3.

Fuji, please fix these issues too with a firmware update:

The Custom display view is unavailable in EXR Auto. Custom is the only view where framing aids like the histogram, grid lines, and electronic level are available. I appreciate the electronic level and miss it from EXR Auto.

Allow 30 second exposures from ISO 100 to 1600. For now 30 second exposures are only available at ISO 100. At ISO 400 it's 8 seconds. At 800 it's 4 seconds and at 1600 it's 2.

ISO Bracketing isn't useful in low light. It takes three shots with identical shutter and aperture. Only the ISO changes between the three so the brightness varies. What would help in low light is lock the aperture and adjust the shutter speed to compensate for the ISO. The three shots will have the same brightness with three opportunities for a sharp, clear photo. Then keep the sharpest one with hopefully low ISO.

I did and I stand by every point I listed except the very last one about manual focusing, which I have since been informed about using the AFL/AEL to help focus.

Only a firmware update can solve the issues or add the features I listed.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2012 at 04:34 UTC
On Just Posted: Fujifilm X-Pro1 review article (271 comments in total)
In reply to:

Neimo: FUJI, here is how to make the manual focus dial enjoyable for this camera, the X10, and probably the other X cameras:

How fast or slow the dial is spun should determine if the focus distance moves a large amount, or just a bit. A fast spin of the dial should move the focus from 2cm to 2m. Another fast spin takes it to infinity. A medium spin should move the focus from 2cm to 50cm. A slow spin makes sure the focus covers every discrete distance position.

In practice, there should not just be fast, medium, and slow speeds. Whatever the speed of the spin is should determine how much more or much less quickly the focus moves.

Thanks chooflaki. I read the manual cover to cover but missed that. It makes a big difference.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 13, 2012 at 05:11 UTC
On Just posted: Fujifilm X10 in-depth review article (155 comments in total)
In reply to:

Eiffel: Thank you for the review. I must say that I was expecting better compared to my Canon Powershot S100 (which only scored 72%) and some of the hype.

- Image quality, Jpeg or Raw is equivalent at best despite the slightly bigger sensor (at low or high ISOs)
- The Fuji is bigger, heavier and lacks many of the features I like (24mm,
GPS, etc.)
- Combining the power switch with the zoom control is, in my view, not such a great idea, as it's not possible to set the camera to a given focal length reliably if one turns it on and off.

Having a viewfinder is a plus, as is the faster lens in telephoto (although a limited version thereof), but the price differential makes it unattractive

Maybe the next version will correct all these issues...

The camera can do a quick start up and can be set to power off after a minute. So if you need a certain zoom length for a little while that will solve it.

The X10 is meant to compete against the Canon G12, not the S100, hence the larger size.

In the low light 6 MP mode, the X10 does much better than the S100 since the sensor has adjacent pairs of photosites.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 12, 2012 at 23:46 UTC
On Just posted: Fujifilm X10 in-depth review article (155 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jimmy jang Boo: Go to the link below (or page 16 of the review) and move the magnifying view box from the coins on the bottle to the paper clips.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fujifilm-x10/16

The Olympus XZ-1 kills the X-10 in contrast, focus and three dimensionality. No contest - not even close!

If the XZ-1 truly deserves the 74% rating dpr gave it, then they were feeling mighty generous towards Fuji.

At ISO 100 the XZ-1 doesn't have more detail. Most obviously on the right edge where the feather overlaps with the color boxes. The X10 shows more of the faint lines of the barbules. The XZ-1 shows the lines of the feather tips converging into a mostly solid block of yellow.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 12, 2012 at 22:36 UTC
On Just posted: Fujifilm X10 in-depth review article (155 comments in total)
In reply to:

Neimo: I'm glad the review noted the grey bar on the screen. I really want to turn that off for composing in 1:1 and 4:3.

Fuji, please fix these issues too with a firmware update:

The Custom display view is unavailable in EXR Auto. Custom is the only view where framing aids like the histogram, grid lines, and electronic level are available. I appreciate the electronic level and miss it from EXR Auto.

Allow 30 second exposures from ISO 100 to 1600. For now 30 second exposures are only available at ISO 100. At ISO 400 it's 8 seconds. At 800 it's 4 seconds and at 1600 it's 2.

ISO Bracketing isn't useful in low light. It takes three shots with identical shutter and aperture. Only the ISO changes between the three so the brightness varies. What would help in low light is lock the aperture and adjust the shutter speed to compensate for the ISO. The three shots will have the same brightness with three opportunities for a sharp, clear photo. Then keep the sharpest one with hopefully low ISO.

More things to improve:

When deleting photos the confirmation window has two choices, OK and Cancel. Cancel is the default. Allow users to change the default to OK. Deleting will go 50% faster.

To delete multiple photos, each one must be tediously selected. Add a way to select only the first and last in a range of them such as 0022 through 0086 and then delete the range.

As noted in the X-Pro1 review, pictures taken in Continuous drive mode use are saved with a different filename convention. Please change this or give users the option to change to use the same convention for stills and continuous drive.

Also as noted in the X-Pro1 review, adjusting manual focus takes too long and too much rotating the wheel. Fix this by detecting how fast the wheel is spun and move the focus more quickly or slowly to correspond. That will make taking a macro shot followed by a panorama picture quick and easy.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 12, 2012 at 21:02 UTC
On Just posted: Fujifilm X10 in-depth review article (155 comments in total)
In reply to:

Neimo: I'm glad the review noted the grey bar on the screen. I really want to turn that off for composing in 1:1 and 4:3.

Fuji, please fix these issues too with a firmware update:

The Custom display view is unavailable in EXR Auto. Custom is the only view where framing aids like the histogram, grid lines, and electronic level are available. I appreciate the electronic level and miss it from EXR Auto.

Allow 30 second exposures from ISO 100 to 1600. For now 30 second exposures are only available at ISO 100. At ISO 400 it's 8 seconds. At 800 it's 4 seconds and at 1600 it's 2.

ISO Bracketing isn't useful in low light. It takes three shots with identical shutter and aperture. Only the ISO changes between the three so the brightness varies. What would help in low light is lock the aperture and adjust the shutter speed to compensate for the ISO. The three shots will have the same brightness with three opportunities for a sharp, clear photo. Then keep the sharpest one with hopefully low ISO.

More things to improve:

After taking a picture, allow review for longer than 1.5 or 3 seconds by pressing Zoom Out. This removes the need to enter the playback mode and the screen blinking to black for a distracting quarter second.

In review/Playback mode, portrait-oriented photos don't automatically rotate to fill the screen when holding the camera vertically so the image can match the screen. The pictures are displayed small and narrow in the middle of the screen with black vertical bars. Worse, when zooming in the black bars remain. That's right. As it zooms it doesn't use the whole screen, only the middle strip that a 4:3 portrait takes up. So a 16:9 or 3:2 image starts narrower and will zoom in to fill the space of 4:3 but no further. There is a menu setting to playback portrait shots rotated ninety degrees but then they always are like that and require turning the camera vertically for them.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 12, 2012 at 21:01 UTC
On Just posted: Fujifilm X10 in-depth review article (155 comments in total)

I'm glad the review noted the grey bar on the screen. I really want to turn that off for composing in 1:1 and 4:3.

Fuji, please fix these issues too with a firmware update:

The Custom display view is unavailable in EXR Auto. Custom is the only view where framing aids like the histogram, grid lines, and electronic level are available. I appreciate the electronic level and miss it from EXR Auto.

Allow 30 second exposures from ISO 100 to 1600. For now 30 second exposures are only available at ISO 100. At ISO 400 it's 8 seconds. At 800 it's 4 seconds and at 1600 it's 2.

ISO Bracketing isn't useful in low light. It takes three shots with identical shutter and aperture. Only the ISO changes between the three so the brightness varies. What would help in low light is lock the aperture and adjust the shutter speed to compensate for the ISO. The three shots will have the same brightness with three opportunities for a sharp, clear photo. Then keep the sharpest one with hopefully low ISO.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 12, 2012 at 21:00 UTC as 21st comment | 4 replies
On Just posted: Fujifilm X10 in-depth review article (155 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jimmy jang Boo: Go to the link below (or page 16 of the review) and move the magnifying view box from the coins on the bottle to the paper clips.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fujifilm-x10/16

The Olympus XZ-1 kills the X-10 in contrast, focus and three dimensionality. No contest - not even close!

If the XZ-1 truly deserves the 74% rating dpr gave it, then they were feeling mighty generous towards Fuji.

The X10 sensor isn't a traditional bayer pattern. It's been acknowledged the alternative pattern doesn't have the same sharpness. However it's better in low light, high contrast, and high dynamic range scenes.

At ISO 100, look at the Baileys bottle countryside. The X10 almost has as much detail. When resized for a screen or printed, it will look almost as good.

Alternatively for pixel peeping, look at the yellow feather behind the fuchsia and brown feather. The X10 actually captured more detail and texture. The XZ-1 smeared the fine detail.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 12, 2012 at 20:41 UTC
On Just posted: Fujifilm X10 in-depth review article (155 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jimmy jang Boo: Go to the link below (or page 16 of the review) and move the magnifying view box from the coins on the bottle to the paper clips.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fujifilm-x10/16

The Olympus XZ-1 kills the X-10 in contrast, focus and three dimensionality. No contest - not even close!

If the XZ-1 truly deserves the 74% rating dpr gave it, then they were feeling mighty generous towards Fuji.

At ISO 800, look at the older woman's hair. The XZ-1 smeared away the detail. Also look at the blond hair in the lower right. The XZ-1 is a smeary glob.

If you're never using your camera to photograph people in lower light conditions, the XZ-1 is better. Unless it's a high contrast scene and you don't want so much highlight clipping or black shadows. Then the X10 is better again thanks to the superior dynamic range.

The XZ-1 has limited circumstances when it has better image quality. It's like a car with lots of power but not so good cornering. The X10 has the cornering and a good amount of power. It's better balanced.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 12, 2012 at 20:01 UTC
On Just Posted: Fujifilm X-Pro1 review article (271 comments in total)

FUJI, here is how to make the manual focus dial enjoyable for this camera, the X10, and probably the other X cameras:

How fast or slow the dial is spun should determine if the focus distance moves a large amount, or just a bit. A fast spin of the dial should move the focus from 2cm to 2m. Another fast spin takes it to infinity. A medium spin should move the focus from 2cm to 50cm. A slow spin makes sure the focus covers every discrete distance position.

In practice, there should not just be fast, medium, and slow speeds. Whatever the speed of the spin is should determine how much more or much less quickly the focus moves.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 30, 2012 at 08:51 UTC as 27th comment | 3 replies
On Just Posted: Fujifilm X-Pro1 review article (271 comments in total)
In reply to:

plainwhite: I'm coming from a Nikon D700 with AF-S lenses and I can say that I am very happy with my X-Pro 1. Being a photographer that shoots almost exclusively on fully MANUAL and who is intentional on most every shot taken, I can't say that in my experience that the AF or any of the other "issues" have been a problem.

It is a joy to use and has left my other D700 and D7000 to collect dust for the most part. In fact, this summer I'll be going to Australia and plan only on taking the X-Pro 1.

Would you find it easier to manually focus between close-up and distance shots if the dial responded differently depending on how quickly it spun? For example a fast spin of the dial moved the focus from 2cm to 2m. Another fast spin to reach infinity. A medium spin moved the focus from 2cm to 50cm. A slow spin to make sure the focus covers every discrete distance position.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 30, 2012 at 08:20 UTC
On Just Posted: Fujifilm X-Pro1 review article (271 comments in total)
In reply to:

ldog: Fuji Please Please fix the few bugs that separate this camera from high end hobby to truly pro. I own and truly love this camera but it is like the Mona Lisa with bad breath. The image quality is the equal of my M9-P (yes, really) BUT the handling quirks make it suck for dynamic pro situations. The slow AF and useless MF is well documented and my solution is to shoot with Leica lenses and use manual focus. Fast, Pro, Lovely. HOWEVER THE INEXCUSABLE flaw for a "pro" camera is that the EVF (a must use for 3rd party MF lenses) does not "refresh" or let go of the current exposure fast enough to stay "in the moment". Also you get no image preview on the LCD as you must shut off the image preview when shooting with the EVF. If the image preview was selectable independently for the EFV and LCD this would be golden. A few fixes would make it professionally useful and this camera would become iconic. Fuji, just give a bunch of these to wedding photographers and listen to them. C'mon Fuji!!

The manual focus is painful because a firmware fix is so simple. The control dial needs to respond differently depending on how quickly it is spun. A fast spin of the dial should move the focus from 2cm to 2m. Another fast spin takes it to infinity. A medium spin should move the focus from 2cm to 50cm. A slow spin makes sure the focus covers every discrete distance position.

In practice, there should not just be fast, medium, and slow speeds. Whatever the speed of the spin should determine how much more or much less quickly the focus moves.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 30, 2012 at 08:15 UTC
Total: 29, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »