CarstenKriegerPhotography

CarstenKriegerPhotography

Lives in Ireland Ireland
Works as a Photographer
Has a website at www.carstenkrieger.com
Joined on Aug 17, 2011

Comments

Total: 51, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous123Next ›Last »
In reply to:

Mike FL: I'm looking for replacing my SRL for a while, and interested in EM1 and XT1. But there is only one possible problem; "Fujifilm, Olympus and Panasonic are doomed...".

http://www.digitalcameranews.co.uk/2013/12/30/fujifilm-olympus-and-panasonic-are-doomed-according-to-credit-suisse-analyst/

We will see, but no one could stop it from coming when it comes as we saw it from the past...

"Only those who have a strong brand and are competitive on price will last" and the author mentions Canon, Nikon and Sony... I can agree with Sony, I am not sure about Nikon but Canon surely isn't competitively priced...?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 2, 2014 at 09:45 UTC
On Sigma 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM Review preview (335 comments in total)
In reply to:

falconeyes: I would have been keen to learn about AF consistency using the new 70D's dual pixel live view AF.

I have been using the 70D and Sigma 18-35mm for about a week now and so far the live view AF is very consistent and accurate compared to the viewfinder AF. I haven't tried it out with fast moving subjects yet but so far it looks rather promising.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 2, 2013 at 17:07 UTC
On The GigaPan EPIC Pro article (40 comments in total)
In reply to:

rfsIII: One question I've not seen addressed is whether the Gigapan can handle the classic landscape shot where you have a big foreground object like a rock or a tree close to the camera, something in the middle ground like a meadow, and something far away like mountains? Obviously every camera handles autofocus differently, but does it seem to work out OK? Do you lock focus on some hyperfocal distance? Use a very small f/stop? Or do you just let the autofocus do its thing?

I didn't address this issue because I am still in the process of figuring out an easy solution. Placing the focus point 1/3 into the frame and setting the f-stop around f16-f20 works rather well. For some however this doesn't produce high enough quality files because diffraction becomes an issue (depending on the lens used). Focus stacking is a possibility but not very practical, same goes for adjusting focus for each tile. In any case use MF, AF only causes problems.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2013 at 09:19 UTC
On Accessory Review: GigaPan Epic Pro article (13 comments in total)
In reply to:

MarshallG: Can it be used for astrophotography?

That's one of the first things I asked as well :-) The answer is unfortunately no... for the moment at least. But I was told it is among the things GigaPan is thinking about.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 18, 2013 at 07:13 UTC
On The GigaPan EPIC Pro article (40 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dan Tong: Carsten,

This is a superb review. Not only do you go over all of the important details of the product, but supply excellent illustrations of the resulting images. Furthermore you appear to have a really good objective approach giving both the pros and the cons of the device as well as the bundled software and the forum features.

Great Job.

My question is it not possible to configure the controlling process to increase the "settle down" time between each shot? This would allow any vibrations to settle down after moving from one position to the next, assuming that the vibrations are cause by the position stepping, and thus eliminate the motion blurring.

Thanks very much,

Dan Tong

Thanks Dan. You can indeed adjust the settle down time between each shot. Unfortunately the vibration problem I had was caused by external factors, mainly wind (unfortunately we have a lot of it in Ireland). The EPIC Pro picked up even light to moderate breezes. Due to the unique construction of the EPIC Pro these vibrations are passed on to the camera (at least that's my theory). No settle down time or tripod made a difference. Exposure times faster than 1/500 managed to avoid motion blur in most cases, anything slower and motion blur showed up in some shots.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 17, 2013 at 07:55 UTC
On The GigaPan EPIC Pro article (40 comments in total)
In reply to:

Artak Hambarian: It would be interesting to know if Gigapan Clamp Bar by RRS makes any substantial difference in terms of overall sturdiness. Can anyone comment?

Didn't know such a clamp exists, thanks for the pointer! Only looking at it I don't think it will improve sturdiness as the clamp doesn't change the basic design of the EPIC Pro.
But being able mounting the camera vertically would make an overall improvement, it's on my wishlist now.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 15, 2013 at 12:35 UTC
On The GigaPan EPIC Pro article (40 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stefan Zeiger: I've been shooting for some months with a GigaPan EPIC and a Sony RX100. I also had problems with blurry pictures in the beginning but haven't seen those any more since I bought a more stable tripod (but, of course, that's with a much smaller and lighter-weight camera than the one you used in the review; plus, I spent more on the new tripod than on the GigaPan). I wish there were an option on the GigaPan for a delay before taking each shot to give the camera time to settle. As a work-around, you can increase the per-shot time and use a self-timer on the camera (2 seconds on the RX100, so it greatly increases the time needed to take all the shots).

I have to agree on the software. It's OK when it works but without a way to control it manually, it is very limiting. I tested many stitching tools and found Autopano Giga to be the most capable with the pre-aligned shots from the GigaPan (but also one of the most expensive options).

Not sure if you can repeat the same exposure at the same location during one run (will check the manual) but you can save and repeat panos which has basically the same effect.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 15, 2013 at 12:29 UTC
On The GigaPan EPIC Pro article (40 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stefan Zeiger: I've been shooting for some months with a GigaPan EPIC and a Sony RX100. I also had problems with blurry pictures in the beginning but haven't seen those any more since I bought a more stable tripod (but, of course, that's with a much smaller and lighter-weight camera than the one you used in the review; plus, I spent more on the new tripod than on the GigaPan). I wish there were an option on the GigaPan for a delay before taking each shot to give the camera time to settle. As a work-around, you can increase the per-shot time and use a self-timer on the camera (2 seconds on the RX100, so it greatly increases the time needed to take all the shots).

I have to agree on the software. It's OK when it works but without a way to control it manually, it is very limiting. I tested many stitching tools and found Autopano Giga to be the most capable with the pre-aligned shots from the GigaPan (but also one of the most expensive options).

Unfortunately letting the camera settle before each exposure doesn't address the problem I had with the EPIC Pro. If the device wobbles at the moment of exposure - caused by wind, a passing truck, etc. - you get blurry pictures. Neither time delay or stable tripod will make a difference then. And in my experience the EPIC Pro is very prone to these external influences.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 15, 2013 at 07:53 UTC
On Ireland: A Photographers' Guide article (43 comments in total)
In reply to:

robonrome: Thanks for the enjoyable article. Ireland is on my list. Lovely muted colours and moody lighting here. One question I wondered why you use F22 so often even in images that don't seem to demand that depth of field...?

I am kind of a relic from the film era. One of the first things I was taught was "f5.6 for wildlife and f22 for landscapes" and I hung on to that for a long time. Old habits die slowly. In addition I had to use f22 with many of the images posted with the article to get a long enough exposure time for that soft water effect.
Today I aim for f8 - 16 (using mainly tilt & shift lenses for landscapes).

Direct link | Posted on Apr 21, 2013 at 07:51 UTC
On Ireland: A Photographers' Guide article (43 comments in total)
In reply to:

John Clare: "North East: Mayo, Sligo, Leitrim and Donegal"

As a native Irishman I can assure you that should say "North West" (and in the paragraph below). Excellent article - thanks for sharing. Surprised there is no photo of the Cliffs of Moher though.

Slieve League is indeed impressive and are a bit off the beaten track (http://www.carstenkrieger.co.uk/photo14166741.html) but are not the highest. The cliffs at Croaghaun on Achill Island are some 80 meters higher than Slieve League according to some guide books.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 21, 2013 at 06:48 UTC
On Ireland: A Photographers' Guide article (43 comments in total)
In reply to:

M DeNero: Beautiful! Except that ultra- HDR Sunrise over the Burren. Very tacky.

It was a bit of a "rock and hard place" situation. The problem here was the tree. Balancing the shot with a graduated filter would have turned the top half of the tree pure black so I opted for HDR. It wasn't the perfect solution either and the top part of the sky could have turned out better. However this is mainly a software problem and I am hoping future software updates will render the sky more realistic. CK

Direct link | Posted on Apr 20, 2013 at 15:00 UTC
On Ireland: A Photographers' Guide article (43 comments in total)
In reply to:

Raincheck: Wow, that "Cultivated Landscape Near Tallanstown" shot knocks me out. Completely out of the tourist domain, there lies some of the heart of Ireland. That wedge of field rows in the center with the dry grass before, and the vast hills beyond, rolling off into eternity, is pure art. I wonder how long Krieger had to wait for the clouds to part and light it up perfectly? Then the lighted wedge in the grass that underlines it tells me he has the LUCK of the Irish. I would rub his head to try and grab luck like that.

One of my favorite methods in Landscape and a major goal of my own is to show the grandeur yes, but leave the viewer standing knee deep in the terrain. In that shot I can even smell the dry grasses.

Where do I buy a print? I'd like it signed please.

Thank you for your kind words. I am flattered, more comments like this please :-)
I had discovered the location earlier that day and decided to come back in the evening. Conditions were good and I only had to wait half an hour or so before sky and light were perfect. The moon was an unexpected bonus. It was one of the few occasions when everything went according to plan.
Prints are available here: http://www.carstenkrieger.co.uk/moonrise-amp-countryside
CK

Direct link | Posted on Apr 20, 2013 at 14:46 UTC
On Ireland: A Photographers' Guide article (43 comments in total)
In reply to:

John Clare: "North East: Mayo, Sligo, Leitrim and Donegal"

As a native Irishman I can assure you that should say "North West" (and in the paragraph below). Excellent article - thanks for sharing. Surprised there is no photo of the Cliffs of Moher though.

Thank you John and it should obviously be 'North West'. And as for the Cliffs of Moher: If you want to photograph great cliffs better go to Loop Head: less people, no entrance fee and no fences. CK

Direct link | Posted on Apr 20, 2013 at 07:56 UTC
On The DSLR Field Camera article (180 comments in total)
In reply to:

EssexAsh: interesting article, thanks :) How does this compare to using hyperfocal focusing though?

When using hyperfocal distance calculations you most likely have to stop down the lens to f16-f22 to gain the front to back DOF you want. This can cause diffraction (the smaller the aperture opening the higher the diffraction) which again causes a loss of sharpness, images can appear mushy. With tilting you take advantage of the Scheimpflug effect. You can use the lens at its sharpest f-stop (around f8), get front to back focus and a shorter exposure time (which can be helpful as well). C.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 27, 2012 at 14:35 UTC
On The DSLR Field Camera article (180 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rainer Mirau: http://www.silent-moment.com/prints/ebook_TS.htm
super thema, deswegen habe ich darüber ein eBook veröffentlicht!
;-)

Ich kenne zwar das Buch nicht es ist aber Deine Schuld, dass ich mit shifting and stitching angefangen habe :-) C.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 27, 2012 at 10:19 UTC
On The DSLR Field Camera article (180 comments in total)
In reply to:

José Ramos: Good technical explanation, but why use tonemapped images when you're trying to show that a certain technique can yeld images with tons of natural detail which should not need detail-extraction in post-processing?

HDR/tonemapping and shift & stitch really have nothing to do with each other and it just happens that I use both techniques with one image. I am currently using HDR as an alternative to ND grads to balance exposure. The shift & stitch part I explain in the article is to gain higher resolution images and formats other than 35x24mm. C.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 27, 2012 at 10:14 UTC
On The DSLR Field Camera article (180 comments in total)
In reply to:

mantra: hi
great article

i like a lot the eyecup , does someone know the brand or the name?

with the ts24 L 3.2 i use always the live view

It's a Hoodeye and I got mine here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B005GK9OQK/ref=oh_details_o05_s00_i00 C.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 27, 2012 at 10:06 UTC
On The DSLR Field Camera article (180 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mssimo: Why not use a high quality UWA lens and focus stack (if needed)?

Focus stack is of course a possibility but has its practical limits like all merging/stitching techniques. C.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 26, 2012 at 21:47 UTC
On The DSLR Field Camera article (180 comments in total)
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: @David - perfectly correct - the back, i.e. the camera has to move. There should be a mount on the front of the shift lens.

Moreover - whats wrong with just turn the camera around the nodal point and just stitch? Why this unnecessary shift lens?

Nothing wrong with using a pano head and moving the camera around the nodal point. The use of a TS-E lens is just another approach to a similar goal. C.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 26, 2012 at 21:31 UTC
On The DSLR Field Camera article (180 comments in total)
In reply to:

David Myers: We have used this and similar techniques since the early 1990's with the 6Mp Kodak/Nikon F5 DSLRs. Unfortunately this 'shift-and-stitch' procedure is wrong. The front of the lens needs to maintain position to keep the viewpoint / nodal point the same so it is the back of the lens, camera and sensor that needs to shift! We maintain the front objective spacial positioning by mounting our D800e body on a gear driven macro slider positioned with left to right sliding. Example: After we shift the front of the lens 15mm to the left we 'recentre' the lens objective by sliding the whole rig 15mm to the right. this is avoids 'multiple viewpoints' of foreground elements which are impossible to stitch. Cheers, David.

David your approach is of course the technically correct one but is much more material and labor intensive. The shift & stitch approach I described however works very well within its limits and is an easy way to gain some resolution. C.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 26, 2012 at 21:27 UTC
Total: 51, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous123Next ›Last »