Najinsky

Najinsky

Joined on Feb 21, 2006

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Total: 295, showing: 81 – 100
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On Just Posted: Ricoh GR preview news story (159 comments in total)

I have to say I'm delighted with how this has turned out.

I heard the rumours of the APS-C sensor and feared it would pass over an imaginary 'compactness/performance' threshold that lives in my head and manifests itself in my subconscious decisions not to take a camera out with me.

But looking at the size, weight, features and performance, it looks like they may have just bang-on nailed it.

Really looking forward to your updates in the coming weeks.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 17, 2013 at 08:49 UTC as 41st comment
On Just Posted: Ricoh GR preview news story (159 comments in total)

Re: WB not available on the ADJ button.

This would be good feedback to give directly to Ricoh if you get the chance. They have a history of listening to user feedback and releasing feature enhancing firmware to implement the more practical suggestions.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 17, 2013 at 08:37 UTC as 42nd comment
On Pentax Ricoh releases Ricoh GR camera with APS-C CMOS sensor news story (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

qwertyasdf: Ricoh GR has a loyal albeit small fan base, curious to know what's the magic of the GR series?

Now, for almost the first time, you don't need to sacrifice great IQ to enjoy the richer shooting experience. A great day for Ricoh fans.

Now, those who strive towards great IQ don't need to tolerate/compensate a sub-standard shooting experience. A great day for a new wave of soon to be Ricoh fans.

All in all, a great day for photography I think.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 17, 2013 at 08:21 UTC
On Pentax Ricoh releases Ricoh GR camera with APS-C CMOS sensor news story (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

qwertyasdf: Ricoh GR has a loyal albeit small fan base, curious to know what's the magic of the GR series?

It's a design thing.

GR is Ricoh's high grade brand of lens. GR Digital is a compact body designed to enjoy the lens through photography.

Usually, compact bodies take their cues from consumer electronics and the photographer spends a lot of time fighting with poorly placed and/or poorly thought-out controls.

Ricoh gets it right. Putting the right controls in the right place and implementing them from a photography perspective. Once you customise the controls for your shooting style (or set multiple configurations if you use multiple styles) you're good to go.

Your mind is free to contemplate the photography, not the camera operation.

It's a very simple concept, but can make a huge difference in enjoying photography. It's not magic, and the real mystery is why more camera makers can't get it right!

There's lots of small design details too that you come to appreciate in actual use. Like the recessed strap lugs mean there are no snagging points when you stow and un-stow the camera.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 17, 2013 at 08:03 UTC
In reply to:

Najinsky: Will this do the software correction for the lenses prior to encoding?

Many of the m43 lenses require significant software correction to remove distortion. There are a handful of lenses with low distortion (for example the 2 45mm's, the 25/1.4 and the 75/1.8, perhaps the 12/2) but most of the rest will need correcting.

If the capture is only 1920 x 1080, wont there will be noticeable resolution loss with some lenses due to the severity of the distortion?

Mainstream raw converters correct the distortion during conversion so relatively few people ever see how bad it is. But pre-corrected distortion can be very extreme, almost like a fish eye in some cases and would be very noticeable if uncorrected.

You can use a dcraw based raw utilities to view the uncorrected files, but for some lenses it's best to avoid eating for a least a few hours before viewing ;-)

With such distortion resolution loss is unavoidable.

However, I've since read the sensor is 2k x 2k. And from that snippet I'm now guessing:

a) BMCC will probably correct for distortion.
b) The distortion will lead to a resolution loss with some lenses.
c) But in reality it's probably not a big deal.

Just use the cost savings from the camera to buy the good lenses with low distortion. And even for the more distorted lens, some resolution loss away from the centre will be acceptable anyway.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2013 at 05:46 UTC

Will this do the software correction for the lenses prior to encoding?

Many of the m43 lenses require significant software correction to remove distortion. There are a handful of lenses with low distortion (for example the 2 45mm's, the 25/1.4 and the 75/1.8, perhaps the 12/2) but most of the rest will need correcting.

If the capture is only 1920 x 1080, wont there will be noticeable resolution loss with some lenses due to the severity of the distortion?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2013 at 04:35 UTC as 33rd comment | 3 replies
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector news story (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: LOL. That one wouldn't have even made my keeper list, let alone my portfolio. I'm going to have to check my archives to see what hidden treasures I missed.

Sometimes I think I 'get' the concept of art, but then the ethanol wears off and I'm just left with a headache.

-Najinsky

Is the artist allowed to like or not like his images too? If so he must be free to choose which images he takes forward with him, and which to abandon. It's the artists call.

The respect for this image seems to come from it's subsequent role in photographic history. Long after the artist decided to compose, shoot, process and print. And long after he decided if it went to his keepers pile.

I like to think of my comments as relating to the artist at the human level. The self criticism of ones own work and achievements.

That image wouldn't have made my keepers list. It's a simple and honest and human comment.

The fact that it's attracted a harsh critical response by todays art snobs, who as always have the gift of hindsight, though rarely foresight, only leads me to wonder if one day historians will consider it an iconic post that changed the boundaries of commenting as we know it.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2013 at 10:38 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector news story (300 comments in total)

What's interesting, is the edited version shown at the smithsonian site linked to below.

It has the car bumper at the photo's right edge cropped out.

It's interesting to contemplate how this happened.

For example was this done by the editor at the smithsonian site, who thought to himself, that bumper to the right of this iconic image looks a bit messy and should really be cropped out.

Or maybe the artist himself struggled with the artistic interpretation of the bumper and his decision to leave it in the frame.

Or perhaps this is a change he made when producing the new print, to counteract the possibly of a lawsuit by showing the images are not the same.

Riveting stuff, no?

For those to tired to hunt for the link I'll copy it here:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/William-Egglestons-Big-Wheels.html?c=y&page=1

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2013 at 10:18 UTC as 32nd comment | 1 reply
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector news story (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: LOL. That one wouldn't have even made my keeper list, let alone my portfolio. I'm going to have to check my archives to see what hidden treasures I missed.

Sometimes I think I 'get' the concept of art, but then the ethanol wears off and I'm just left with a headache.

-Najinsky

Yes Mam, right away. No wait, I have to watch this paint dry.

Perhaps you can recommend a book that explains why everyone needs to like the same thing?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 06:37 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector news story (300 comments in total)

LOL. That one wouldn't have even made my keeper list, let alone my portfolio. I'm going to have to check my archives to see what hidden treasures I missed.

Sometimes I think I 'get' the concept of art, but then the ethanol wears off and I'm just left with a headache.

-Najinsky

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2013 at 02:36 UTC as 78th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Najinsky: Why did this go on the connect site. Is computer software no longer part of the main DPR site?

Indeed. Looks like this playground lost its monitor. Cool, we can play with matches and use potty mouth words like poo poo. Tee Hee.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 29, 2013 at 05:50 UTC
On Fujifilm X100S preview (218 comments in total)
In reply to:

WolfyWho: Is it just me, or does the OMD beat all 3 of the others in this test in terms of sharpness? What am I missing? There's definitely more dynamic range in the X100s that I can see, compared to the OMD.

Download the Raw ISO 200 JPEGs. The Martini bottle, below the cap is the royal crest, between "By Appointment To Her Majesty The Queen" and "Suppliers of Martini Vermouth"

OM-D is notably beating the X100s (and X-Pro 1) here. To really see what's happening you need to zoom in many times perhaps 10X so you can see what's really happening. There are too many differences to list, but the most obvious are:

The actual text is well defined versus soft.
The lions face, mane and crown is distinct versus mush.
The shield rendering is distinct versus mush.
The small lion on top has a distinct tail versus mush.
The White on Red letting is much better.

Anyone with eyes will see these stark differences if they choose to..

Corner softness (at F8?) is playing a part (the image is distorted and soft here), but it is the random mush that gets rendered when the contrast drops that is proving to be a signature for this sensor. Nowhere close to the hyped FF quality, and being bested by μ4/3 here.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 28, 2013 at 09:36 UTC

Why did this go on the connect site. Is computer software no longer part of the main DPR site?

Direct link | Posted on Mar 28, 2013 at 06:56 UTC as 29th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

osu9400: Sorry for being a pessimist here, but we are talking about Google. Does this mean:
1. This product is no longer a priority and won't see further development?
2. Will we start seeing tons of Google ads in the product?

@ Kananga, what development? Development seems to have been frozen. Not even support for Retina Macs (it works, but it uses a scaled display mode rather than native Retina).

And while I'm pleased by the announcement of their intention to evolve the product, I just hope it means adding new filters and features, not just transitioning it to a cloud based subscription service.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 28, 2013 at 06:11 UTC
In reply to:

Phil Askey: There's no Android API for reading raw pixels from the sensor, you always get a pre-processed 'bitmap' which (as you stated) has been demosaiced, gamma corrected and white balanced (and whatever else the manufacturer's camera driver does to the data on the way through). On a rooted phone it may be possible to access the low-level camera device and read data off that way, hence it's more likely that IF a phone camera ever supports RAW it'll come via the phone manufacturer's own camera app or a change in the Android API.

@Phil: re: "Seems a bit pointless to process RAW files from a camera...an Android device".

Everything is pointless until there is a point. It's within the definition.

iOS has built in support for raw files in that they are recognised media types. This means they are recognised as and can be used as images. It uses the embedded JPEG for display, but for most cameras these are good quality and at least it makes the files directly usable.

There are then the third party apps that can actually process the raws to develop the image.

When combined, this provides a lot of flexibility for photographers who shoot raw.

Import the shoot and they are instantly usable as images. But if you screwed up the capture and need to rescue the shadows/highlights/WB, you can fix those by developing the raw.

It is a little less useful on Android because raws are not recognised media types and therefore require additional processes to extract the previews and try to keep them associated with the raws.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 28, 2013 at 05:47 UTC
In reply to:

Phil Askey: There's no Android API for reading raw pixels from the sensor, you always get a pre-processed 'bitmap' which (as you stated) has been demosaiced, gamma corrected and white balanced (and whatever else the manufacturer's camera driver does to the data on the way through). On a rooted phone it may be possible to access the low-level camera device and read data off that way, hence it's more likely that IF a phone camera ever supports RAW it'll come via the phone manufacturer's own camera app or a change in the Android API.

Just to clarify, you mean no way to get raw from the built in camera. Obviously there are several iOS raw converter apps that work with raw files loaded onto the device from a camera. I assume Android has too by now.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 27, 2013 at 05:50 UTC
On Pro DSLRs, Pro Photographers article (125 comments in total)
In reply to:

h2k: Thanks, i enjoyed this article very much - and even more so in Print view: one long page, and on a white background at that! It didn't look like DPR any more, but it was soothing indeed.

I liked the photography- and job-related questions much more than the camera-related questions. I wouldn't have needed the inner pluralism of putting Canon and Nikon into one story.

It was nice that you brought short bios plus pictures of the two photographers interviewed at the end. I think those bios and portraits would be even better at the beginning of the article, so that we can imagine a face together with the name tag.

And as i am just a hobbyist, i am not ashamed to confess: I'd like to read the interviewees' year of birth in the bios.

@prairiewinters

A quicker way on the Mac is just to hit the "Reader" blue button at the end of the URL.

If you want to read it offline, just add it to your reading list (the reading glasses icon on bookmarks bar).

Direct link | Posted on Mar 15, 2013 at 02:30 UTC
On Pro DSLRs, Pro Photographers article (125 comments in total)

While most of us here on DPR perhaps don't have the same requirements as Sports pros and PJs, there are lots of great soundbites that probably ring true with our own experience.

For me, the Canon feeling like an extension of the hand was the subject of my very first post here on DPR in 2007. Where after months of research in choosing a Nikon D200, I actually bought the Canon 20D after holding and shooting with it.

Another is 'workflow is everything' which brings to mind the recent heated debates about Fuji's X-Trans issues with the popular workflow products.

Perhaps the real value in this excellent article is to help remind us that people have different requirements and preferences, and that criticism of a camera is as much an invitation for constructive discussion as it is for the loyal wolf-packs to gather looking for blood.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 13, 2013 at 07:25 UTC as 46th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

LarryK: Rambus is not so much a technology company, but rather a patent lawsuit mill.

Best to walk away from anything they develop, it's likely just something their attorneys will use to sue people.

Dat's-a because we respect-a da family.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 28, 2013 at 03:52 UTC
On Adobe's Fujifilm X-Trans sensor processing tested article (144 comments in total)
In reply to:

Henry M. Hertz: so what is it worth?

you have no AA filter so your images look sharper.... but then your images look like crap because no software knows how to handle your damn sensor.

lol

LOL @ EdB3

Ironic you mention people not having any idea what they are talking about (you were referring to me). The clue is in the article:

"The idea behind X-Trans is that its pattern repeats less often than the Bayer pattern, rendering redundant the low-pass filter that usually protects against moiré."

Lets do that last bit one more time.

"rendering redundant the low-pass filter that usually protects against moiré."

Got that yet? The X-Trans CFA is directly related to the removal of the AA, and was done to protect against moiré.

Now, you see that old lady in the test shots above, that yellow banding isn't part of the scene. Do you know what it's called? That's right moiré. Clever sausage.

So has X-Trans succeeded in suppressing moiré?

And has it caused a headache for raw developers?

So which one of us is clueless? The answer is neither, the clues are right there in the article for all to see. But only one of us wants to ignore them and then accuse others of being ignorant.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 27, 2013 at 03:00 UTC
Total: 295, showing: 81 – 100
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