PIX 2015
VENTURE-STAR

VENTURE-STAR

Joined on Jul 24, 2010

Comments

Total: 100, showing: 1 – 20
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Very impressive.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 6, 2015 at 12:23 UTC as 13th comment

I wish I understood what the big deal was about the use of these names? Is there anyone who doesn't understand that it's done for a reason, which is to enhance the image of the product and make more money? It is a certainty that Zeiss or Leica play some part in the development of badged optics, so what? They are either good or they are not.

Many Japanese optical companies make elements and cells for various camera companies. It is general knowledge in the repair business that if you buy a budget Nikon, Canon, Pentax or Olympus SLR, the kit lens is probably made (at least in part) by Sigma. At one time Sigma lens elements were being used in top-end Leica film cameras. So what? This kind of thing has gone on for decades.

The suggestion that a massive company like Sony doesn't know how to make good optics and Canon does is ridiculous. These companies have all the know-how they need and most of their products are assemblies of parts made by others.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 3, 2015 at 16:25 UTC as 8th comment
In reply to:

memau: Japanese are well-known for fetish of Germany optic makers like Zeiss and Leica, no wonder sony and panasonic pay for these german brand, although I think they don't have to do that, because they can design fairly good lens on their own......

Don't Sony own Tamron and use them to make most of their optics?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2015 at 18:30 UTC

Don't automatically expect movie industry performance as these optics may well be put together in a Chinese sweat shop for a very low cost.

Having the name of a top optical company like Zeiss or Leica on your lenses is good for business. That's pretty much the bottom line.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2015 at 18:27 UTC as 20th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

VENTURE-STAR: This undoubtedly okay if fashion items are more important than taking pictures.

This fancy Peak bag is simply too expensive for me and of limited use.

I generally use low-profile ex-military bags which I've fitted out that attract as little attention as possible when I'm out and about.

Thanks for the amusing response Darngood. I clearly don't understand your use of the term snob. Many might think that walking around with an expensive fashion item over their shoulder portrayed them as snobbish I suppose. Never mind, who cares?. My point was that just because you have an expensive bag over your shoulder doesn't make you a good photographer. If you want an expensive bag which may well attract attention from others, perhaps in the wrong place, then so be it. I'm more interested in taking pictures than worrying about nonsense like this.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 30, 2015 at 10:57 UTC
In reply to:

VENTURE-STAR: This undoubtedly okay if fashion items are more important than taking pictures.

This fancy Peak bag is simply too expensive for me and of limited use.

I generally use low-profile ex-military bags which I've fitted out that attract as little attention as possible when I'm out and about.

Darngood, you've made it fairly clear that you don't understand my previous comments. I certainly get this. Sorry, but I never actually said it would make anyone take fewer photos.

I am simply suggesting that someone who gives priority to the way they look (by having a fashion item over their shoulder) is likely to be more concerned with this than the quality/ creativity of their work. They may well go out and shoot thousands of pictures, so what? That's not the point!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 29, 2015 at 22:37 UTC
In reply to:

VENTURE-STAR: This undoubtedly okay if fashion items are more important than taking pictures.

This fancy Peak bag is simply too expensive for me and of limited use.

I generally use low-profile ex-military bags which I've fitted out that attract as little attention as possible when I'm out and about.

Why should the bag make any difference to the number of pictures you take? It may simply indicate the kind of importance some people attach to their appearance and attract attention from the wrong people.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 27, 2015 at 23:42 UTC

This undoubtedly okay if fashion items are more important than taking pictures.

This fancy Peak bag is simply too expensive for me and of limited use.

I generally use low-profile ex-military bags which I've fitted out that attract as little attention as possible when I'm out and about.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 25, 2015 at 23:02 UTC as 17th comment | 7 replies
On Week in Review: To boldly go article (66 comments in total)
In reply to:

VENTURE-STAR: I wonder if anyone on this thread is aware that the sensors were designed and manufactured in Eastern England?

E2V is the company responsible for the sensors.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-33562686

Lassoni: Actually, there are some very high tech companies in Eastern England supporting Formula 1 and of course Lotus Cars somewhere near Norwich.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 21, 2015 at 23:56 UTC
On Week in Review: To boldly go article (66 comments in total)

I wonder if anyone on this thread is aware that the sensors were designed and manufactured in Eastern England?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 19, 2015 at 00:47 UTC as 5th comment | 4 replies

A superb photograph, with an impressive "End of Days" look. Wish I'd taken it!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 15, 2015 at 18:53 UTC as 9th comment
On Nikon D750 service advisory warns of shutter issue article (341 comments in total)
In reply to:

VENTURE-STAR: I have to smile when I read some of the ill-judged comments by people who wonder why anyone would complain when a company like Nikon are good enough to fix a serious design or production problem with one of their overpriced products.

This whole discussion concerns very poor quality control and putting the product into the marketplace much too quickly. It doesn't matter how complicated the equipment is, you expect certain standards with modern technology.

Imagine being out on an important photographic job and you can see a great news picture, when your almost new camera fails due to some stupid manufacturing defect? I'm sure many of the people defending the camera companies on this thread would rightfully go ape s**t if it happened to them.

Common sense seems to suggest you should always wait a couple of years before buying a new camera or lens to avoid these kind of issues.

HR, I can't quite see the point you are making. It's generally a matter of quality control, making products at the lowest possible price and putting them on the market much too soon, because you're afraid that a rival will take the lead.

Digital imaging is obviously a relatively new thing, but so what? That's no excuse for badly made products. Car manufacturers are well known for putting vehicles on the road too quickly and some (if not all) major companies build-in the cost of expected failures, recalls, claims etc, on every new product. Do you really consider this acceptable? It's a shabby way of treating the customer.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 14, 2015 at 12:45 UTC
On Nikon D750 service advisory warns of shutter issue article (341 comments in total)
In reply to:

VENTURE-STAR: I have to smile when I read some of the ill-judged comments by people who wonder why anyone would complain when a company like Nikon are good enough to fix a serious design or production problem with one of their overpriced products.

This whole discussion concerns very poor quality control and putting the product into the marketplace much too quickly. It doesn't matter how complicated the equipment is, you expect certain standards with modern technology.

Imagine being out on an important photographic job and you can see a great news picture, when your almost new camera fails due to some stupid manufacturing defect? I'm sure many of the people defending the camera companies on this thread would rightfully go ape s**t if it happened to them.

Common sense seems to suggest you should always wait a couple of years before buying a new camera or lens to avoid these kind of issues.

HR: Actually no obvious problem with my posting, but never mind.

To be honest, I'm not too bothered if you take any notice of what I've said or not, but I will mention that many years of using various pro quality film cameras never gave me any problems. Electronic flash has been another issue.

I have had two Nikon film cameras that have been very badly damaged in use (not my fault) but kept working. Reliability was never an issue. However, the number of good quality electronic cameras I've had problems with during the last 10 years is considerable. This really isn't good enough, but you seem willing to accept the situation. Not me!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 13, 2015 at 23:13 UTC
On Nikon D750 service advisory warns of shutter issue article (341 comments in total)
In reply to:

VENTURE-STAR: I have to smile when I read some of the ill-judged comments by people who wonder why anyone would complain when a company like Nikon are good enough to fix a serious design or production problem with one of their overpriced products.

This whole discussion concerns very poor quality control and putting the product into the marketplace much too quickly. It doesn't matter how complicated the equipment is, you expect certain standards with modern technology.

Imagine being out on an important photographic job and you can see a great news picture, when your almost new camera fails due to some stupid manufacturing defect? I'm sure many of the people defending the camera companies on this thread would rightfully go ape s**t if it happened to them.

Common sense seems to suggest you should always wait a couple of years before buying a new camera or lens to avoid these kind of issues.

For goodness sake HR, I would have expected slightly more adult comments from someone like you. Most of the camera manufacturers including Canon are guilty of exactly the same practices as Nikon and I've already made this point earlier. BTW, I would suggest that as an ex-newspaper photographer and photojournalist with years of experience, I have probably used many more film cameras than you have, but who actually cares?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 13, 2015 at 14:28 UTC
On Nikon D750 service advisory warns of shutter issue article (341 comments in total)

I have to smile when I read some of the ill-judged comments by people who wonder why anyone would complain when a company like Nikon are good enough to fix a serious design or production problem with one of their overpriced products.

This whole discussion concerns very poor quality control and putting the product into the marketplace much too quickly. It doesn't matter how complicated the equipment is, you expect certain standards with modern technology.

Imagine being out on an important photographic job and you can see a great news picture, when your almost new camera fails due to some stupid manufacturing defect? I'm sure many of the people defending the camera companies on this thread would rightfully go ape s**t if it happened to them.

Common sense seems to suggest you should always wait a couple of years before buying a new camera or lens to avoid these kind of issues.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 13, 2015 at 12:04 UTC as 15th comment | 8 replies
On Nikon D750 service advisory warns of shutter issue article (341 comments in total)

This is really pretty disgraceful - again!. There was a time when companies like Canon and Nikon would release products that were thoroughly tested and evaluated. Major faults were rare. Now they are putting equipment in the market place ASAP and then falling back on everything from software updates to recalls.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 12, 2015 at 00:55 UTC as 25th comment | 7 replies

This is just the kind of totally idiotic nonsense which makes you realize that the EU is a complete waste of space and it's politicians are largely out of control. It should never have been allowed to become anything more than a common market.

Laws that are not enforced today, may well be vigorously used tomorrow.

We've already seen some very aggressive interference with perfectly legitimate photography in the UK by over-zealous police, supposedly implementing anti-terrorist legislation and company security staff, who have no legal authority whatsoever.

Everyone's rights are being chipped away with every week that passes and you have ask the question, is Cavada a total retard with nothing better to do, or what?

Maybe I will be able to copyright my own appearance, so it becomes an offense to use any video recordings of me made by the police or any other official body for any purpose without my consent!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2015 at 14:16 UTC as 8th comment | 5 replies
On Canon warns about dangers of counterfeit camera gear article (153 comments in total)

Canon are always trying to make a big issue about counterfeit goods. If you are conned into buying an overpriced Canon speedlight that is not kosher, then this is clearly criminal. If, on the other hand you buy an equally good knock-off for half the price that proves reliable then Canon only have themselves to blame and the chances are that original and copy both come from the same factory in China, Taiwan or wherever.

Many of the alternative accessories made for Canon and Nikon are equally as good and sometimes better than the originals, selling at a much lower price. I never buy lens hoods, filters, batteries, etc that are manufacturer labelled as they are often not very well made and always a total rip-off.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 3, 2015 at 16:40 UTC as 27th comment
In reply to:

MSTR Photography: I think the mistake everyone here is making is not looking at what can keep Hasselblad viable in today's and tomorrows market. There is nothing wrong with branching out into the ILC market or the APS C market or even the full frame market to help the company grow.
Instead of trying to bring the bling like Leica does to an over-priced product, they need to consider bringing the quality they are famous for to a reasonably priced product. I don't mean dropping their prices to Sony, Canon or Nikon levels (which are all making great cameras), but following the example of Pentax in making a product which is affordable to the semi-pro photographer while maintaining their ever-present quality standards would go a long way to keeping them in the ever trembling photography market and help to strengthen their position as a top of the line company with both the product and the photographer in mind.

AR - In my own experience, the quality of many affordable West German made post-war cameras was simply not good enough and they were generally much too expensive. This is what killed the Voigtlanders and Zeiss Ikons. Pro cameras like the Rolleiflex became too expensive and couldn't compete with Japanese products made by companies like Mamiya in terns of cost and quality. There was nothing in Europe to compare with the Spotmatic, Nikon F, etc, etc and that's what killed the European amateur camera business. Leica and Hasselblad survived, because they produced superb hardware that was designed as tools - for example being chosen by NASA and the US military for various jobs. These were never simply posh items of hardware to wear around your neck on a South of France beach.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2015 at 02:01 UTC
In reply to:

zzzxtreme: Please continue rebadging cameras so we can have a laugh. We need a joke in the photography industry

Having a track record that lists Gucci doesn't exactly inspire confidence. If Perry Oosting had been head of R&D at Leica, or somewhere similar, that would tick all the right boxes.

Sadly, I don't think we should expect too much.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 26, 2015 at 14:28 UTC
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