fortwodriver

fortwodriver

Lives in Canada Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Works as a Network Service Operations
Joined on Dec 29, 2007
About me:

Wow, I haven't heard the term 'plan' since the Unix days!
Anyway, I've got a modest kit - a Canon 7d, 17-40L, 10-20 EF-S, Sigma 30mm 1.4, 100-300 (the cheap one without IS), 580EXII, and some gadgets like flash bracket, remote cords and such. I've been lurking on here for years. So I guess you could say that my 'plan' is to contribute more to the discussions here.

I'm always looking to learn...

Comments

Total: 18, showing: 1 – 18
On Sony Alpha 7S in low-light: See video at ISO 409,600 news story (234 comments in total)
In reply to:

falconeyes: People are amazed. However, this is something EVERY recent Nikon or Sony full frame camera with Sony sensor is capable of in still. Just push ISO from 6400 by 6 EV in post, apply heavy NR and downscale to video resolution.

The thing new is the missing line skipping which doesn't loose you anymore 2 EV or so in video mode. And the gradation options help overcome the limitations of the missing raw file.

Here's an interesting question... What happens to ISO409k after you've been holding the camera for a few minutes and your own body warmth begins to raise the thermal noise in the sensor through the camera body?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 12, 2014 at 02:36 UTC
On Sony Alpha 7S in low-light: See video at ISO 409,600 news story (234 comments in total)

<sarcasm>
Great, now we have a camera that takes photos in practical darkness. Here come the thousands and thousands of flickr entries showing dark rooms, dark corners, and general darkness without any attention to lighting technique. Why? Because you can now do that, and it will be good because those photographers will call themselves "pro".
</sarcasm>

Direct link | Posted on Apr 11, 2014 at 16:38 UTC as 85th comment | 4 replies
On Fujifilm teases upcoming SLR-style X system camera news story (921 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joed700: Fujifilm has done an excellent job with the X-series camera, especially with the X100s and the XE-2. I think it would be nice if the X is a full frame camera. I'm kind of getting tired of the Canikon cameras only because they both lack the feel and the look of a classic camera....

So get a medium-format back and body and be done with it. You could probably find a medium format back under 25mp relatively cheap on the used market now.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 21, 2014 at 00:59 UTC
On Fujifilm teases upcoming SLR-style X system camera news story (921 comments in total)
In reply to:

M DeNero: I see comments like "Wonderful controls!" and "Great ergonomics!" Pardon me for asking, and I'm not trying to be a wise guy, but is there really any benefit to these retro designs other than aesthetics? Modern SLRS have precision, customizable controls that mostly lie right under the finger tips of one hand. You can make adjustments without even thinking about it, while keeping the other hand on the zoom or focus ring. These retro designs seem to have nicer industrial design, but after handling several they seem very clumsy to me operationally. Please enlighten me.

I don't know what sort of physical limitations you guys have with your hand-eye coordination. People have been operating modern SLRs in the dark since they came to be the defacto control methodology in the 90s.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 21, 2014 at 00:53 UTC
On Samyang offers lens kits for videographers news story (22 comments in total)
In reply to:

sportyaccordy: You know, on the outset these sound like great lenses, and I'm sure they are. But I think I will pass. The 16 2.0 for example sounds FAST. But on APS-C it's equivalent to 24 3.2 35mm. Meanwhile, I can get a Lens Turbo and an old 24 2.8, which would translate to a 16 1.8, for less money. A lowly 50 1.8 becomes a 33 1.2. Etc. etc. Plus I would be getting 2 lenses in 1 with each lens. Not saying these lenses are worthless or that the speed booster combos would be a match in IQ, but for me right now, ehhh. I mean a 24 2.0 an 50 1.4-1.8 would cover the span of a standard zoom with max apertures reaching 1.0 depending on the combo. Plus it's all MF anyway.

...but these are measured in T stops, not F-Stops. So their stops are calibrated to the amount of light they transmit.

Are you worried about DOF?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 1, 2013 at 16:34 UTC
On Marco Bohr investigates 'hipster photography' news story (105 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kirk Bruner: Are there still hipsters? I thought they were over already. From the tone of this article, it seems the writer is talking more about advertising than photography. It's not really an article about style as much as one on demographics. Meanwhile, as hipsters are hitting thirty now, their influence days are numbered. Even Instagram itself is less a spread of something new than it is a dollop of nostalgia. It is, after all, a set of computer-controlled filters devised to turn perfectly good photos into what look like old snapshots left on a garage shelf for fifteen years. Yeah, it was fun for a minute when it was new, but it's gone on now for years and it hasn't really become anything else. It's kind of like the mp3. Lousy fidelity for the sake or portability. Why does the mp3 persist now that storage is making it possible to use actual wav. files? There's not even any nostalgic value to that. I think the article really describes what is simply the current version of the Pepsi generation.

Sounds good to me! It's advertising that set this all in motion. As the current generation of "hipsters" get closer to "hip-replacement-sters" advertising will appeal to the next group of 20-somethings and it'll start all over again. First with Instagram and then with whatever ends up being the next visual flavour of the month.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 20, 2013 at 20:21 UTC
On Marco Bohr investigates 'hipster photography' news story (105 comments in total)

Besides, in the 70s and 80s as a kid I remember having a camera. It was a Kodak 110 Instamatic. Later on I had a fixed lens 35mm compact camera with no meter. At least the 110 had a meter - but you had no idea what it was doing.
They took pictures that, in less than ideal light, came out looking an awful lot like Instagram shots! As kids we couldn't afford "good" cameras like Nikon Fs or Canon A series cameras.

Anyway, we took our "cheap" cameras everywhere we went and casually snapped away, relying on the latitude of common negative film to get us through our lack of control over exposure.

These types of articles bring out the hate in people every time. Mainly because everyone owns large, complicated cameras with lots of functionality and fancy themselves arm-chair critics. My family and friends were always amazed and surprised how our photos came out given the simple cameras we had access to.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 20, 2013 at 18:18 UTC as 24th comment
On Marco Bohr investigates 'hipster photography' news story (105 comments in total)

Did this all happen in New York in the 60s and 70s?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 20, 2013 at 17:59 UTC as 25th comment | 2 replies

Take note measurebators and arm-chair critiques! These photos are a fantastic example of what people can do when they get out and USE their cameras!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2013 at 12:56 UTC as 17th comment | 1 reply
On Gorgeous color photos of America in the 1930's and 40's news story (110 comments in total)
In reply to:

Hobbit13: These (amazing) photos have been online for ages (Wikipedia uses them in many articles). So what's the "news"?

I'm still deeply impressed by the image quality of the "Turret lathe operator ", even for today's standards, that's a very high resolution picture.
see full image at:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1a/WomanFactory1940s.jpg (uploaded in 2005!)

Agreed...

Except that Ansel, throughout his books repeatedly admits he made many mistakes and a lot of his techniques were borne out of the desire to salvage poor negatives. His earliest photographs were almost entirely produced by guesswork and experience. Many pieces were shelved for years as unprintable because the types of paper and chemicals he needed simply didn't exist yet. Throughout the years he re-printed and reprocessed his existing collection with new print materials and techniques to try and refine his vision for whatever he saw. He was very humble when it came to this sort of thing.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 25, 2013 at 13:17 UTC

I still have a Casio QV-10A and the proprietary cable and even the power-cube so you could use it without batteries. I remember when the music store I hung out at bought it - $800 Canadian dollars at the time and it was considered a bargain!

We also had a Sony thermal video printer we could plug it into with an RCA video cable. I think the printer was about $3000.

An awful lot of "sefies" were taken with that camera because you could flip the lens around backwards and it would automatically "right" the photograph upright.

I powered the camera up the other day - it still works - barely. After a while QV-10 cameras had an issue with their sprung sliding on switch. The camera would randomly switch off.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2013 at 13:09 UTC as 28th comment
On Gorgeous color photos of America in the 1930's and 40's news story (110 comments in total)
In reply to:

clicstudio: Gorgeous and amazing photos! They almost look recent.
Makes u realize the "real" photographers were those, 70 to 80 years ago, who shot manual and film and without an LCD screen to help and no photoshop.
I really admire them and the glimpse of Americana their photos show. Color makes the whole difference.
Thanx for sharing!

Hah! Magazines? I remember most magazines at one point or another butchered images by using poor offset registration and lousy quality control at the presses. Bring on digital, you can always re-scan a transparency/negative with whatever technology exists "now" and leave the past (ie: re-souping and internegatives) behind.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2013 at 00:24 UTC
On Billingham marks 40 years of history news story (31 comments in total)

Hehehe... when I showed a Leica/Billingham toting friend of mine this little tid-bit about the company origins as makers of fishing bags he nearly went ballistic.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 21, 2013 at 00:04 UTC as 6th comment
On Sir Jonathan Ive to design one-of-a-kind Leica M rangefinder news story (164 comments in total)

Ive could design a Leica AND figure out a way for Foxcomm to make it AND make it for $2000 each. That's the realm Ivy works in.

Apple more or less conquered the smartphone. There's no reason they couldn't do the same for the camera... ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Sep 21, 2012 at 23:07 UTC as 8th comment
In reply to:

Nublover: Leica is not good at digital (same as Germany cars). A Sony FF Nex plus Leica lenses will be my dream. Cheers! Anyone agree with this pls reply. Thx.

Geez, I drive a diesel smart for two, and I've now had it for 6 years and have had no problems with it at all. The engine is Mercedes/Bosch and it still drives like the day I brought it home.

Now that aside, I bought a dealer-demo and that shaved a few thousand off the price. I also bought it the year they brought in the gas version, so nobody wanted the diesel anymore... which shaved more dollars off the cost. I got a bargain!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 21, 2012 at 00:37 UTC

I've used a Leica M7 a few times. I really liked it but I can't afford my own digital Leica at this time. For now, it's best to rent or borrow...

I must say, though, the finish on the M-E, that kind-of blue-grey anthracite is really lovely! If the photos on their website and here are accurate then that colour really strikes me!

I hope they keep this finish available for future models and don't keep it as a "prestige" or "limited" colour.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 21, 2012 at 00:33 UTC as 9th comment
In reply to:

fortwodriver: Perhaps I missed something in the specs. Notice there is no screen for the bright-line illumination between the finder and the focus baseline? The M-E has it, but this one doesn't.

Has Leica done away with this?

Wow, I didn't know they would go that route at all. I'll have to look that up. Thanks!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 18, 2012 at 22:25 UTC

Perhaps I missed something in the specs. Notice there is no screen for the bright-line illumination between the finder and the focus baseline? The M-E has it, but this one doesn't.

Has Leica done away with this?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 18, 2012 at 16:27 UTC as 26th comment | 3 replies
Total: 18, showing: 1 – 18