toxinoz

toxinoz

Lives in Australia Adelaide, Australia
Works as a Medical practitioner
Has a website at www.toxinology.com
Joined on Mar 15, 2007

Comments

Total: 3, showing: 1 – 3
In reply to:

ThePhilips: Despite my enduring lust for the GM1, I stoically voted for the GX7. I also voted for it with my wallet :)

This year was really amazing for the mirrorless, with more barriers broken for good: size (GM1/12-32 kit), working on-sensor-PDAF (E-M1), sensor size (A7). (Honorary mention for "the most ridiculous price" goes to Olympus E-P5.)

Were I still mirrorless-less this year, I would have probably voted for the Nikon AW1: to promote the idea of more and more affordable weather-sealed cameras/lenses.

I have the EM-1 & very happy with it, but agree with you that the GX7 is a really interesting camera. If I could afford both, I would have one alongside my EM-1. I bought the GM1 for my wife as a travel camera and she absolutely loved it. It is superb as a small competent travel camera that can take good lenses if you wish. Well done Panasonic!

Direct link | Posted on Jan 2, 2014 at 00:36 UTC

I have the EM-1 & really like it (so voted for it), but I almost voted for the Pany GM-1 which my wife has - it is a wonderful little travel camera and a shame it got so few votes. Though I don't have it (yet) I think the Pany GX-7 is a a very interesting camera worthy of a strong vote. So, while the EM-1 appears the winner at present, both of these Panys deserve consideration for winner.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 26, 2013 at 04:40 UTC as 13th comment
On Mirrorless Roundup 2011 article (429 comments in total)

bgbs (and others here) suggest mirrorless cameras cannot be considered seriously by photographers because they are not part of a system. In my experience, this is a complete misconception. In the m4/3 area alone (Panasonic & Olympus bodies, so far; lenses from Panasonic, Olympus, Leica, Sigma etc) there is now a diverse, comprehensive and growing range of lenses, from ultra wide-angle, to powerful telephoto, from zooms to primes, from very fast (f0.95) to not so fast, plus a range of flashes, cordless off-camera multi-flash, and even the ability to use lenses from almost every other camera/lens maker, albeit in manual mode. You can even use bellows and specialist macros from the old Olympus film system, macro lenses which no other system ever had (as far as I know), plus ring flashes, twin flashes etc from the Olympus 4/3 range. It is entirely practical for a serious photographer to travel with a range of these lenses + bodies to shoot a wide array of subjects; I regularly do so.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 20, 2011 at 22:03 UTC as 58th comment | 2 replies
Total: 3, showing: 1 – 3