larsbc

larsbc

Lives in Canada Vancouver, Canada
Joined on Jan 16, 2004

Comments

Total: 20, showing: 1 – 20
On Samsung introduces Galaxy Note 4 phablet with OIS post (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jogger: I see a lot of women with Notes.. mostly because they are easy to tote around in purses/handbags. For men, its far too large unless you are using a man-purse or have extra large pockets.

@Tonkotsu: I've had a Note 2 for almost two years, now. I carry it in my pants pockets when walking. Slim jeans, shorts, etc. Not a problem, really. With some of my shorts, you can tell I'm carrying a phone, but in my jeans, you can't. I've been very happy switching to a large-sized screen and wouldn't go back to anything smaller. YMMV of course.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2014 at 21:57 UTC
On Nikon 1 V3: a quick summary article (597 comments in total)
In reply to:

anthony mazzeri: I imagine choice of micro-SD would enable the card to be swapped/loaded onto a smartphone if needed, rather than for space-saving purposes.

For that, you could use micro-SD-to-SD card adapters (basically, it's an SD card with a slot into which a micro-SD card fits). Forcing its users to use micro-SD cards is silly, imo.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 13, 2014 at 14:29 UTC
In reply to:

Glamour by Jim: I bought the media drive as soon as it was available. When I travel I shoot a different card every day, and at the end of the day I want to back up that card.

The media drive does this great for me. I am very pleased and would recommend it highly. There is an app for Apple table that will allow image editing.

Has anyone ever lost a disk, or been unable to download (at home) important shots taken on a trip. I have, and it not fun.

You can simplify that even further by using an inexpensive integrated hub and SD card reader. That plus an OTG cable and you can use a great many Android phones/tablets to backup the SD card to a USB HD or USB data stick.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2013 at 01:13 UTC
In reply to:

Donald B: no evf, awkward for people that need reading glasses.

To Dave whose message originally said that an EVF is more awkward for people who wear glasses.

Someone who needs READING GLASSES uses them for close focusing on things like books and, yes, camera LCD panels. On the other hand, an EVF with diopter correction means such a person wouldn't have to put on reading glasses to use the camera.

Do I think Fuji should have put an EVF in this camera? Considering its price range, probably not. But that doesn't change the fact that people who need reading glasses often times find an EVF to be more convenient.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 17, 2013 at 05:58 UTC
On First look: Sony QX10 and QX100 mobile cameras post (45 comments in total)

So for $100 more you can buy a complete RX100, and it won't be tremendously larger than the QX100. And it'll have full control over the various exposure parameters and raw capability.

I don't see this being a successful product. It's too cumbersome for casual shooters, and too limited for serious shooters.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2013 at 21:36 UTC as 14th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

SAERIN: What about the OVF. Is it a 100% view of the LCD.

I'm pretty sure it isn't. I don't think there's parallax correction, either. I never used the OVF with my G11. I might've, had there been some shooting info displayed in it, such as the AF point location.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2013 at 20:58 UTC
On 5 Reasons why I haven't used my DSLR for months article (591 comments in total)
In reply to:

ZAnton: I don't know what is the purpose of this article.
Of course DSLR cann't be a "always with me" camera. If I go shooting, I take DSLR, if I go cycling/hiking/walking I take a pocket camera.
So that's it.

I think it's timely because now there are a handful of pocket cameras with large sensors. I just bought an RX100 II. I had no idea that its 1" sensor was so good, or that the RX100 which had a similar sensor was also extremely good. Yet the RX100 came out 6 months (or more?) ago. I think many photographers are like myself; we weren't aware that premium pocket cameras have made dramatic image quality improvements over the past year. This article draws attention to that.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2013 at 20:02 UTC
In reply to:

BJN: Just what Micro Four Thirds doesn't need – a seedy start-up leveraging the eviscerated Kodak legacy with what I predict will be cheap, low quality products.

Possibly. Or maybe (who knows?) it might turn out like Cosina when they bought Voigtlander's brand. This early in the game, I won't write them off as a bad thing for the format.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 18, 2013 at 21:40 UTC
In reply to:

parallaxproblem: Simply awful: hundreds of dollars for something that becomes landfill as soon as the battery is expired. Shall we also start scrapping cars when the tyres wear or brake pads need replacing?

Apple was the company that started this wasteful trend and I will never buy one of their products for exactly this reason

@Dan: my 3 year-old 3GS is going to my daughter who wants an iPod. It will serve her well for a few years once I replace the battery (fortunately, the 3GS's battery is somewhat user-replaceable. Were I not able to do this, the phone would be junk in another 3 months.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 1, 2012 at 20:36 UTC
In reply to:

Photomonkey: Considering that these devices and all their ilk are tossed as soon as the next shiny thing comes along, what incentive is there to engineer with repairability in mind ?

@Dan: Not at all. Not everyone needs the latest and greatest. There are many organizations seeking good condition, used cell phones to pass on to people in need. Smart phones with wi-fi, a webkit browser, and a common OS (ie: iOS, Android) are valuable even without having a cell plan.
Having an easily replaced battery can usefully extend the life of these devices.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 1, 2012 at 20:32 UTC
In reply to:

racketman: some company should bring out a tablet targeted specifically at photographers with CF and full SD slots etc

I agree. Just having a USB port which can operate in host mode would be a big step (ie: like some of the Android phones/tablets). The "camera kit" that Apples makes available for copying images off of an SD card is very, very limited. USB host mode would go a long ways toward making an iPad much more useful as a travel device for me. I already have an iPad 3 so I'm switching to Android for my next phone in order to get USB host capability.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 23, 2012 at 23:24 UTC
In reply to:

drrjv: AirPlay and the unparalled range of Apps on the iPad trumps all the others. ShutterSnitch, which uses EyeFi Sd cards, is reason enough to go iPad.

There may be unparalled apps for iOS compared to Android, but the hardware connectivity is very limited with iOS. Since I prefer to use my desktop to edit/process images, it's more important that I have a way to back up my files while travelling. In that regard, Android has a significant advantage.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2012 at 22:09 UTC
In reply to:

Mark Rosher: Interesting round-up, but fails to address one of the major benefits of an on-shoot tablet. No-one here, I imagine, cares what the quality of the on-board camera is - the best is going to be no better than a cheap compact. But connect a tablet to the camera, wirelessly or via a cable, and it becomes a touch screen large electronic viewfinder.

I use my Android ICE Acer Iconia A500 tablet (a bit old now) with my Canon 7D and it makes distant shooting - for example for bird shoots - so much easier. Sat a USB cable length away from the camera on the tripod, I can select focus and other characteristics, and shoot remotely.

Of course, not all tablets can connect via USB...

@ drrjv
Did you read that article you're linking to?? They require that the camera be connected to a computer, and the iPad talks to the computer to control the camera. Plus you'd need the camera to have a wi-fi radio. So, a usb cable vs. a computer + wifi module for camera, I'd go for a simple usb cable.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2012 at 22:06 UTC
In reply to:

drrjv: AirPlay and the unparalled range of Apps on the iPad trumps all the others. ShutterSnitch, which uses EyeFi Sd cards, is reason enough to go iPad.

@ drrjv
The "open thing," despite opening the device to malware, is still an advantage. Many current Android devices allow USB host mode which gives them access to many accessories including external hard disks. The user-accessible file system also makes them very easy for moving all manner of files onto and off of the device while travelling (no need to connect to an iTunes-like application). Malware is a danger, yes, but smart users can avoid them (I work in IT and notice that it's always certain users who always get hit).

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2012 at 21:45 UTC
In reply to:

Deleted pending purge: So far, I can see a tablet replacing a laptop to a degree, in the sense of better portability and high quality image rendering. However, its shooting capabilities are insofar just not adequate.
Maybe some manufacturer might try to exploit the advantages of Origami optical system to better the performance.
Add-on memory slot and standard contact(s), like USB 2 and 3 will have to be there too, before it becomes interesting in a way the laptops are...

"Add-on memory slot and standard contact(s), like USB 2 and 3 will have to be there too, before it becomes interesting in a way the laptops are"
That's what annoys me about this article. USB 2.0 Host mode is supported on some Android devices so you can attach a keyboard, mouse, HD, USB stick, card reader, etc. to them. This would increase their utility for handling some photo tasks (image backup or uploading being an obvious one). But the author never mentioned that at all. BTW, some Android tablets also support memory card slots.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2012 at 21:39 UTC
In reply to:

Kim Letkeman: This article was nice, but ultimately really disappointing. I want to know how to replace a laptop and / or external storage with a tablet, as in the full work flow from transfer to storage to editing. Not how to use its crappy camera in place of the much better m4/3 cameras I am already carrying. Some of what I am interested in was alluded to, but unless I had a world-class brain fart, this article did not actually go into any depth on how it might be possible to live with a table and your cameras only while on the road. It ends up being a puff piece and unworthy of DPReview. I can get this kind of high level info on CNET or one of the many gadget sites :-(

@ David Hart
I thought ICS didn't support NTFS and that it required a hack or something in order for it to read/write to an NTFS device?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2012 at 21:33 UTC

Speaking for myself, and as a photographer, I have zero interest in how my tablet's camera performs. When I travel, I use my camera for images, and am only interested in a notebook or tablet for what it can help me with AFTER the image is captured using a dedicated camera. I shoot in RAW and I wait till I get home before I edit images, so for me, the ability the back up images from the camera's card to an additional storage device (typically a portable hard drive) is far more important to me than the device's built-in camera. As much as I like my New iPad, I don't find it useful for backing up my images because it's storage capacity (64gb) is simply not big enough (especially when it's packed with files and apps that I typically bring on my travels). That's why my next smartphone will be an Android device so I'll have some way to backing up my images to a hard drive.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2012 at 21:29 UTC as 38th comment
In reply to:

larsbc: What about the ability to use USB host mode to copy files from an SD or CF card and write it to a hard disk when travelling? A great way to back up images. As far as I know, this can be done with some Android devices.

Unfortunately it doesnt. It'll let me copy files from an SD to the iPad's internal storage, but it won't let me copy files from the internal storage to an external HD.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2012 at 21:22 UTC

What about the ability to use USB host mode to copy files from an SD or CF card and write it to a hard disk when travelling? A great way to back up images. As far as I know, this can be done with some Android devices.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2012 at 05:36 UTC as 72nd comment | 2 replies
On Sony NEX-7 high-end APS-C mirrorless camera first look article (355 comments in total)
In reply to:

Eric Glam: My disappointments with the NEX-7:

1. No clean HDMI-out. When connected to an HDTV, it displays all the menus along with the video feed, and the resolution is not 1920x1080, but less.

2. No touch-screen LCD. The NEX-5N has a touch screen, why not the NEX-7?
I know it has 3 dials, which is great, but why not add the touch capability as well?
I know a lot of folks who love using touch-focus, and it's missing here.

3. The screen only tilts up and down, like on the NEX-5 and NEX-5N. I really wanted a hinge mechanism just like the one on the A77.

4. Anyone here know how many focus points the NEX-7 is supposed to have?
And how many of those are cross-type?
Sony gladly mentions this on the A77 and A65, but no word what-so-ever of this feature on the NEX cams.

NEX-7 uses contrast detect AF, so there are no discrete AF sensors. AF is based on the image sensor's read out. Cross-type doesn't apply to contrast detect AF.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 24, 2011 at 14:56 UTC
Total: 20, showing: 1 – 20