Jurriaan Schalken

Jurriaan Schalken

Lives in Netherlands Amsterdam, Netherlands
Works as a art director / photographer
Has a website at www.directiondesign.nl
Joined on Jan 26, 2005
About me:

I use whatever camera i have with me when I am out, from DSRLs, to compacts to
mobiles. If it takes images, I like it :-)

Professionally I use Canon 5d2/5d
For fun and experiments Casio Exilim Pro 1
For nostalgia Eos 30 with Velvia
For snapshots my iPhone

No camera is better or worse than another, just more or less useful for a certain
purpose. I believe technology cannot be the limiting factor to creativity, it can only
expand it.

Comments

Total: 5, showing: 1 – 5
On Just Posted: Hands-on Canon EOS 6D preview news story (590 comments in total)
In reply to:

Münchhausen: The Price Point is ridiculous, for the 6d As well As for the Nikon D600. We're broke in Europe, and we will simply not shell out 2000€ for a entry level FF. Greed is good, but it is killing economy right now. Where is the camera manufacturer that would offer a 1500$/€ FF camera? Sony could have done it, but they didn't have the cojones for it, or Pentax, but they don't have the will either. I won't by anything of this, and even not the RX1 with its ridiculous price. vale

I agree with munchausen. I bought my original 5d for 1700 euro brand new (1,5 year after release). I bought my 5d2 for 2000 euro brand new, a year after release. So this sounds like a bad deal for the price, specs-wise.

I also think canon is milking out outdated sensor technology, because sony EXMOR is a generation ahead in noisefloor/dr/resolution.

I am not buing a new Canon DSRL before there is new sensor technology and raw video out. Nikon has it already.
And they offer more for the price.

Canon did great with 5D and 5dmkII. After that they focussed too much on their pro cinema line, which is also too expensive compared to RED, and forgot it's DSRLs that many (starting) filmmakers want.

- I also find the fanboy replies about Munchausen's opinion about the 6d's dubious price/features degrading. I have used Canon for 15 years and for the first time I am seriously looking at the competition.

Looks like Nikon is trying HARDER to win my heart than Canon is trying to keep it.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 05:43 UTC
In reply to:

Jurriaan Schalken: Does the image of flagbearing/waving muscled heroes still work for people?

I know nationalism and patriotism are important aspects of american life, but images like that always remind me of... North Korea. NOW i don't say the countries are alike, no way! Even though The Netherlands and Europe are seen as socialist by many US people/media, when you look at how the country represents itself visually, the US behaves like a communist country (not in terms of ideology, McCarthy's brainwash is still very present).

The way sports heroes are represented as hollow non human nationalist bots with a flag seem very similar (and devoid of humanity) to me.

So, athletes that look human, have a sense of humour AND are the best in their olympic field, is thought provoking and interesting (to me).

Nationalism only works if it's reinforced again and again, and it needs a lot of repetition, to reinforce, what is essentially, a form of ideological brainwashing. Whatever that ideology may be.

thanks for the replies, and I see also, that my 'allergy' to flag waving comes my own cultural indoctrination: which is the fear of something like 1939-45, which has molded european thinking very much.

I believe that all kinds of flagwaving, if done without the possibility of criticism, can eventually lead to mindless people following a flag into anything. The US is not that, I know, but I felt that the potential is there in any strong flag waving country.

And it appears my own country is getting more nationalistic as well.

Probaby a global trend because of lack of identity and the crisis.
But they way people perceive a country, and how it is portrayed in photographs (or their heroes), is an essential part of any culture so I was intrigued to see this 'departure', and it's discussion.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 7, 2012 at 18:01 UTC
In reply to:

Jurriaan Schalken: Does the image of flagbearing/waving muscled heroes still work for people?

I know nationalism and patriotism are important aspects of american life, but images like that always remind me of... North Korea. NOW i don't say the countries are alike, no way! Even though The Netherlands and Europe are seen as socialist by many US people/media, when you look at how the country represents itself visually, the US behaves like a communist country (not in terms of ideology, McCarthy's brainwash is still very present).

The way sports heroes are represented as hollow non human nationalist bots with a flag seem very similar (and devoid of humanity) to me.

So, athletes that look human, have a sense of humour AND are the best in their olympic field, is thought provoking and interesting (to me).

Nationalism only works if it's reinforced again and again, and it needs a lot of repetition, to reinforce, what is essentially, a form of ideological brainwashing. Whatever that ideology may be.

I understand but the discussion to me was about the responses of the photos not being 'patriotic' enough.

I understand fully if people consider the photos unprofessional, and not worthy of the athletes.

Are the athletes themselves dissapointed? That would be the criterium for me. I have the utmost repect for athletes, not so much the way they are portrayed, they can be a used as vehicle for ideology, in stead of sports.

When most people scream, it's not 'patriotic' enough, I feel a stronge urge to deconstruct humanities desire to want to believe they live in the greatest country ever. It makes me allergic, and is potentially dangerous I believe (and the harder people need to tell themselves they live in a great country, the harder it is probably needed to tell yourself that ;-).

(update: corrected some spelling)

Direct link | Posted on Jul 7, 2012 at 15:12 UTC

Does the image of flagbearing/waving muscled heroes still work for people?

I know nationalism and patriotism are important aspects of american life, but images like that always remind me of... North Korea. NOW i don't say the countries are alike, no way! Even though The Netherlands and Europe are seen as socialist by many US people/media, when you look at how the country represents itself visually, the US behaves like a communist country (not in terms of ideology, McCarthy's brainwash is still very present).

The way sports heroes are represented as hollow non human nationalist bots with a flag seem very similar (and devoid of humanity) to me.

So, athletes that look human, have a sense of humour AND are the best in their olympic field, is thought provoking and interesting (to me).

Nationalism only works if it's reinforced again and again, and it needs a lot of repetition, to reinforce, what is essentially, a form of ideological brainwashing. Whatever that ideology may be.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 7, 2012 at 14:25 UTC as 110th comment | 6 replies
On Morning Happiness in the Happiness in magnificent natural light challenge (30 comments in total)

Great capture, great light.

This proves you don't need the latest and greatest gear, to produce the greatest pictures.

Wonderful.

Direct link | Posted on May 13, 2012 at 17:48 UTC as 10th comment
Total: 5, showing: 1 – 5