forpetessake

forpetessake

Lives in United States Transylvania, United States
Works as a exorcist
Joined on Oct 3, 2011
About me:

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Comments

Total: 560, showing: 361 – 380
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On DxOMark investigates lenses for the Nikon D800 article (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

maxnimo: I've been saying this for years. Basically, if you use a cheap zoom lens on a 24 MP camera your image won't even be as good as a clean 4 MP image.

Proven time and time again, better to have an excellent lens on an average body, than an average lens on an excellent body.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2013 at 22:47 UTC
On DxOMark investigates lenses for the Nikon D800 article (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

wadap0: Why do I keep seeing ridiculous comments like "Nikon has no control over their sensors". Everyone knows the D800 sensor was manufactured by Sony. Can anyone reasonably assume that Nikon was not involved in the DESIGN of the sensor? Sony can make sensors at lower cost than Nikon due to economies of scale, but the sensor DESIGN is definitely Nikon's - that is what is important to know.

It's more likely Sony has several verified designs and grades and Nikon picked one.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2013 at 22:45 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 Preview preview (416 comments in total)
In reply to:

MPerks: Nice to see that Panasonic has FINALLY fixed the weird rendition of red that their previous bodies have suffered from (compare the heart on the playing card vs the GH2, for example).

still too much magenta

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2013 at 02:08 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 Preview preview (416 comments in total)
In reply to:

SeeRoy: It's ENORMOUS! Why the hell would you buy an M4/3 camera when it's as big as an APS-C DSLR? I have an OMD and for this reason alone the GH5 is no competitor (no IBIS either...)

Big doesn't make it bad. In fact, it's a lot more comfortable than OM-D. What makes it bad is a small 4/3 sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2013 at 02:05 UTC
In reply to:

Rambazamba: If Fuji had continued with the Nikon mount they wouldn`t need a roadmap.

F-mount is not a bad idea. The size of the camera is limited by the grip, not the mount; the size of the lenses is limited by image circle, speed and presence or absence of mirror, not the mount. Going with F-mount would have made a lot of quality lenses available, but new lenses would still have to be designed due to CDAF limitations and improvements in size & weight, especially on the wide end due to the absence of mirror. Still having Nikon working on your side would have been a big advantage.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 7, 2013 at 19:46 UTC
On Preview:nikon-coolpix-a (442 comments in total)

Let's see, Sony RX100 cost 1/2 of this one, and has very similar lens on short end F/4.9 vs F/4.2 in FF equivalent. I would expect images at 28mm to be very close in all respects, but Sony has many other advantages. So if Nikon wants to compete in this segment, they should lower the price to under $500, otherwise it will be yet another fiasco.

Posted on Mar 5, 2013 at 19:39 UTC as 102nd comment | 1 reply

Going to the logical end, a single pixel can work in a binary mode (detecting light or darkness) similar to dithered images of printers. When they create pixels with 50nm pitch then it can be possible to have image quality close to today's sensors.

But pretty soon, they will hit the law of diminishing returns, the quantum noise is determined by the total light collected by the surface of the sensor. For example, even ideal (noiseless) micro 4/3 sensor will not be able to achieve the performance of today's (not ideal) FF sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 27, 2013 at 19:50 UTC as 36th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

forpetessake: This is essentially the same idea as multiple exposures using electronic shutter. For example, you take 4 normal exposures and merge them into a single image, you get 2 times better SNR (and dynamic range) and effectively pushing ISO 4 times lower. You can do it today with cameras like Sony NEX, except the shutter is not electronic, it's mechanical, so there is problem with moving subjects.
On the subject of the dynamic range. The displays and prints have a lot more limited dynamic range than modern sensors. In order to display higher dynamic range you need to compress it, the more you compress, the less natural image looks. Until displays with much better dynamic range are built, increasing dynamic range of the sensor has little advantages.

'It will just take one normal length exposure.' -- it is and it isn't. It's done by reducing ISO of the sensor (compared to traditional implementation), after that it's normal, but exactly the same thing happens with multiple exposures, except all pixels are reset, not just those that otherwise would be saturated.

'key is doing it in a single take' -- it's defacto electronic shutter, what is one take? and who cares?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 27, 2013 at 19:38 UTC
In reply to:

lost_in_utah: More like US Patent Troll.

"but that's the nature of patents..."
Not at all, the idea of patents was to prevent unfair competition by stealing somebody's ideas. Patent trolls are basically in a business of planting minefields hoping somebody steps on them. The former is constructive the latter is destructive.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 27, 2013 at 19:34 UTC

This is essentially the same idea as multiple exposures using electronic shutter. For example, you take 4 normal exposures and merge them into a single image, you get 2 times better SNR (and dynamic range) and effectively pushing ISO 4 times lower. You can do it today with cameras like Sony NEX, except the shutter is not electronic, it's mechanical, so there is problem with moving subjects.
On the subject of the dynamic range. The displays and prints have a lot more limited dynamic range than modern sensors. In order to display higher dynamic range you need to compress it, the more you compress, the less natural image looks. Until displays with much better dynamic range are built, increasing dynamic range of the sensor has little advantages.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 27, 2013 at 17:02 UTC as 53rd comment | 5 replies

It's becoming a collectors' item, get one while the supply lasts!

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2013 at 23:28 UTC as 36th comment
In reply to:

Nuno Souto: Memo to all companies who pretend to "redefine" the mirrorless market:
the market is micro-4:3rd. Full stop.
Don't waste any more time with "parallel streams" and other such marketing devices to make you waste money and resources.
And FIRE the nincompoops who keep telling you to "redefine" the market!
No? OK, keep running to the edge of the abyss...

In the race for the most idiotic post in this discussion we finally got a winner. Congrats, Nuno!

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2013 at 22:39 UTC

Yes, bye bye K01, we barely knew thee, but we liked the K-mount. Hope thy descendants will be less ugly and more functional.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2013 at 23:34 UTC as 114th comment
On Nikon issues service advisory on D600's dust issue article (240 comments in total)
In reply to:

huyzer: Finally!
EDIT: Not that it isn't late or anything. Plus, as from reading the comments below, doesn't seem like they're fully embracing that it's their fault. What a shame. I use their products too. This really makes me not want to.

Companies never admit to their faults otherwise they open themselves to the liability claims.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 23, 2013 at 00:33 UTC
On Nikon issues service advisory on D600's dust issue article (240 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: If this was a smaller sensor camera then dust spots would not be as big a deal because you don't usually work at very small apertures with them. However, this is a full frame sensor so it could really matter.

G, the f-stop doesn't matter, what matters is the effective aperture, which stays the same for equivalent shots. You shoot at F/8 on FF, you shoot at f/4 on m4/3 -- you get the same results in every possible way.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 22, 2013 at 22:54 UTC
On Nikon issues service advisory on D600's dust issue article (240 comments in total)

As companies trying to squeeze the last penny the first victim is quality. Unfortunately, there is no stopping of that process unless quality starts contributing to a company's margins, i.e. customers start eagerly paying for it. The flood of goods manufactured in China shows that we are not there yet.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 22, 2013 at 22:52 UTC as 78th comment
On World Press Photo announces 2013 contest winners article (298 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mikael Risedal: grattis Paul

Congratulations Paul Hansen and DN, a daily news paper here in Sweden who focuses on good documentary photos .First the Picture of the Year and now this World Press Photo.

If propaganda equals good documentary, then two Josephs (Stalin and Goebbels) should have been sharing the Picture of the Year awards every year.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2013 at 22:28 UTC
On World Press Photo announces 2013 contest winners article (298 comments in total)

Decay of western civilization. Why am I not surprised the photo used for propaganda purposes won the World Press Photo of the Year?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2013 at 22:24 UTC as 88th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Marty4650: This is actually a pretty good idea.

The same concept has been used for decades in the auto selling business. The salesmen call it "take home the puppy" because most times the customer ends up falling in love with the puppy, and wanting to keep it. And then it becomes an easy sale.

Someone at Panasonic is thinking creatively.

It's actually a bad idea for the manufacturer. That only works with very desirable but expensive products to overcome customer reluctance spending money. Same goes for a test ride they offer you at a dealership, the desire to buy is a given, the hurdle is the price. Not so with the cameras, people testing them out aren't even sure they want them, and may end up being even even less sure after trying them. I haven't seen a camera yet, which wouldn't have been disappointing in some areas after trying, expectations are usually higher than reality. It will backfire, soon Panasonic finds out large % of returns and nukes the camera altogether.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2013 at 17:52 UTC
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: Very bad idea. Well, maybe it will work in the UK. I was involved in some Leitz/Leica tryouts. People who were inclined to buy found reasons not to and the people who didn't want to spend the money, still didn't.

This was also tried with a "refurb" selling price, since after the trial, the items were no longer new. Still didn't work. But it did create a lot of used inventory.

True, but it would work if they were renting them out at say $5/day rate, that would cover depreciation, and cut off those who aren't really interested.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2013 at 17:43 UTC
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