Jerry-astro

Jerry-astro

Lives in United States Portland, United States
Works as a Marketing Mgr - Retired
Joined on Jan 16, 2003
About me:

Equipment: Fujifilm X-T1, Fuji 18-55 f/2.8-4.0 lens, Zeiss Touit 2.8/12 lens, Fuji 55-200 lens, Fuji 100-400 f/4-5.6 lens, Fuji 1.4 TC, Nissin i40 flash

Comments

Total: 29, showing: 1 – 20
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On photo Rufous Hummingbird in Flight in the My Best Photo of the Week challenge (2 comments in total)

Thanks, Ruth, much appreciated. We're fortunate enough to have a feeder right outside our window with some nice trees well in the background that lend a pretty bokeh to the shots. Getting them in flight without the feeder in view is a bit of a tricky matter of timing and lots of practice. Been fascinated with these little guys for many years now.

Link | Posted on May 25, 2016 at 00:22 UTC as 1st comment
On article Going Pro: We interview Fujifilm execs in Tokyo (367 comments in total)
In reply to:

Old Cameras: All of their comments are self reinforcing, they sound a little too sure of themselves. In ten years they'll be in exactly the same market position they're in now. They make cameras that try very hard to look like retro film cameras, and simultaneously can't wait to stop making film. Their products overlap each other and until yesterday they all had the same sensor. Their products are the opposite of innovation. Typical sales guys, toeing the company line. I think they're just throwing cameras against the wall, trying to find one that will stick. I like the style but I can't think of a compelling reason to own one.

@badi:
I don't think we're disagreeing, though I'm not sure you can completely separate the "retro look" and external controls. Most modern cameras -- DSLRs in particular -- have tended towards placing ISO and other controls in menus or assigned to multiuse dials. Older "retro" cameras had many of those controls on dedicated dials. The external controls do help the usability of the camera for many photographers and many of the cameras that adopt those controls do so in a way that reminds one of older film cameras (well, at least they remind me of that type of design).

So, it feels as if we're on the same page. I simply used the term "retro" as a catch-all for that sort of approach to camera design.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2016 at 18:14 UTC
On article Going Pro: We interview Fujifilm execs in Tokyo (367 comments in total)
In reply to:

Old Cameras: All of their comments are self reinforcing, they sound a little too sure of themselves. In ten years they'll be in exactly the same market position they're in now. They make cameras that try very hard to look like retro film cameras, and simultaneously can't wait to stop making film. Their products overlap each other and until yesterday they all had the same sensor. Their products are the opposite of innovation. Typical sales guys, toeing the company line. I think they're just throwing cameras against the wall, trying to find one that will stick. I like the style but I can't think of a compelling reason to own one.

Yeah, it's crystal clear from your comments that you've never owned or used a Fujifilm camera. The "retro" look is much more about usability than simply trying to appeal to old school photographers. I've used modern, menu based DSLRs (Canon in particular) and find Fuji's UI to be FAR more intuitive and easy to use. I doubt you'll "get it" until you take one out and shoot with it for a while. Then some of this might be a bit clearer to you.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2016 at 05:26 UTC
On photo Passing in the Night in the My Best Photo of the Week challenge (2 comments in total)

Thanks so much, Ruth. I love the lines of that bridge (only just opened last Fall) and it keeps calling to me to photograph it, especially at night. Was quite lucky to catch two trains passing at the same time.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2016 at 04:22 UTC as 1st comment
In reply to:

neatpicture: Go nuclear instead!!!!

Wow, and here I thought this was supposed to be all about photography. Great capture MarioSS.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 19:26 UTC
On photo Black and Red Beauty in the Butterflies challenge (2 comments in total)

Thanks very much, Jean Pierre!

Link | Posted on Sep 17, 2015 at 21:22 UTC as 1st comment
In reply to:

Promit: Okay, let's get a couple of the common ones out of the way, shall we?

"Canon keeps making a great camera even better."
"Finally Canon is acknowledging that their flagship sports DSLR still needs work."
"Now if only Canon could fix the dynamic range in a firmware update."
"Pointless, just buy a A7R II instead. DSLRs are dead."
"This level of of commitment to pros is why Canon will never lose marketshare to other brands."
"Good to see they're not charging for firmware updates like Panasonic."
"Sony <whatever> is better."
"Nikon <whatever> is better."
"Overpriced camera that still doesn't focus well."
"The best crop DSLR on the market keeps getting better."
"I had a 7D2 and it was the worst camera ever made. Now I shoot with four D810s and thirty thousand dollars of lenses."
"I had a D810 and it was the worst camera ever made. Now I shoot with the 7D2 and only these Canon lenses."
"My iPhone still focuses faster."
"No EVF, no point."
"Nikon needs to release the D400 immediately."

Years? The camera hasn't even been out for 2 years yet. You should have been very clear on what features the camera had when you purchased it, so if the AF capabilities fell short for your needs and expectations, then it's on you for not having done your due diligence before buying the camera. I rented the X-T1 for a few days before deciding to buy and was well aware of areas where it could be improved. I appreciate the enhancements in AF and other areas, but found that the camera more than met my needs when I bought it. Obviously, given the popularity of the camera, a whole lot of others didn't seem to feel that the camera's release was "premature". All cameras have shortcomings... I appreciate the fact that Fuji is willing to address them without requiring you buy a new camera, as both Canon and Nikon most often do.

Link | Posted on Sep 11, 2015 at 14:49 UTC
In reply to:

Promit: Okay, let's get a couple of the common ones out of the way, shall we?

"Canon keeps making a great camera even better."
"Finally Canon is acknowledging that their flagship sports DSLR still needs work."
"Now if only Canon could fix the dynamic range in a firmware update."
"Pointless, just buy a A7R II instead. DSLRs are dead."
"This level of of commitment to pros is why Canon will never lose marketshare to other brands."
"Good to see they're not charging for firmware updates like Panasonic."
"Sony <whatever> is better."
"Nikon <whatever> is better."
"Overpriced camera that still doesn't focus well."
"The best crop DSLR on the market keeps getting better."
"I had a 7D2 and it was the worst camera ever made. Now I shoot with four D810s and thirty thousand dollars of lenses."
"I had a D810 and it was the worst camera ever made. Now I shoot with the 7D2 and only these Canon lenses."
"My iPhone still focuses faster."
"No EVF, no point."
"Nikon needs to release the D400 immediately."

If you read back to my original post here, it was in response to someone who had made a comment about Fuji with respect to firmware updates. You should know darn well that I don't make a practice of trolling and very rarely post in Canon forums or threads any more. I hold no ill will towards them.

And to your comment, Canon's larger installed base is supported by far more resources. So, if they chose to enhance their cameras more substantially (and more often) via firmware, they most certainly could. This isn't a size or logistics issue, it's one of corporate philosophy. You may be happy with what they're doing in that respect, but I've read many, many years of comments by established Canonizes that echo some real frustration about their general unwillingness to make substantial feature enhancements via firmware. Yes, there are exceptions, but that's what they are... exceptions. We can probably agree to disagree on this point since I'm not sure further debate will matter much.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2015 at 18:22 UTC
In reply to:

Promit: Okay, let's get a couple of the common ones out of the way, shall we?

"Canon keeps making a great camera even better."
"Finally Canon is acknowledging that their flagship sports DSLR still needs work."
"Now if only Canon could fix the dynamic range in a firmware update."
"Pointless, just buy a A7R II instead. DSLRs are dead."
"This level of of commitment to pros is why Canon will never lose marketshare to other brands."
"Good to see they're not charging for firmware updates like Panasonic."
"Sony <whatever> is better."
"Nikon <whatever> is better."
"Overpriced camera that still doesn't focus well."
"The best crop DSLR on the market keeps getting better."
"I had a 7D2 and it was the worst camera ever made. Now I shoot with four D810s and thirty thousand dollars of lenses."
"I had a D810 and it was the worst camera ever made. Now I shoot with the 7D2 and only these Canon lenses."
"My iPhone still focuses faster."
"No EVF, no point."
"Nikon needs to release the D400 immediately."

Yup, Fuji has established a nice niche and there's no question that they can't compare in terms of market share, size of product offering, etc. So, their decision to enhance their cameras mid cycle via substantial firmware updates is a differentiator. Canon's updates, with very few exceptions (such as the mid cycle 7D update) are very light on feature enhancements. Canon has plenty of resources to adopt this same philosophy if that was their strategy, however, they've consistently chosen a different path. It's one of a number of things I don't miss about Canon, but in fairness, it doesn't take away from their accomplishments or the popularity of their line.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2015 at 16:20 UTC
In reply to:

Promit: Okay, let's get a couple of the common ones out of the way, shall we?

"Canon keeps making a great camera even better."
"Finally Canon is acknowledging that their flagship sports DSLR still needs work."
"Now if only Canon could fix the dynamic range in a firmware update."
"Pointless, just buy a A7R II instead. DSLRs are dead."
"This level of of commitment to pros is why Canon will never lose marketshare to other brands."
"Good to see they're not charging for firmware updates like Panasonic."
"Sony <whatever> is better."
"Nikon <whatever> is better."
"Overpriced camera that still doesn't focus well."
"The best crop DSLR on the market keeps getting better."
"I had a 7D2 and it was the worst camera ever made. Now I shoot with four D810s and thirty thousand dollars of lenses."
"I had a D810 and it was the worst camera ever made. Now I shoot with the 7D2 and only these Canon lenses."
"My iPhone still focuses faster."
"No EVF, no point."
"Nikon needs to release the D400 immediately."

Everyone has different experiences and impressions. My X-T1 worked great right out of the box. It's not the equal to DSLRs in every way, so if you're a sports or action shooter it may not be the best choice. I'm not, but in terms of handling, usability, the "fun" factor, and intuitive operation, it pretty well blows anything Canon I've used out of the water. This is all very much a matter of individual preferences, styles, etc. and probably not something worth debating.

However, to your last statement, with all of Canon's beta testing, they've had more than their share of issues -- e.g. AF issues with the 7DMkII being a recent example. So, I'd have to take difference with your comment about Fuji simply relying on customers to shake out their issues. Overall, their recent cameras have been relatively free of problems (X-T10 being a really good example of that).

One thing for sure... I'm not missing my Canon and I doubt that I'll ever return to a DSLR. YMMV.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2015 at 14:10 UTC
On photo DSCF3167 in Jerry-astro's photo gallery (2 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mr Low Notes: Wife and I love your cats here!!

Thanks so much! They're pretty awesome kitties and excellent models.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2015 at 13:58 UTC
In reply to:

Promit: Okay, let's get a couple of the common ones out of the way, shall we?

"Canon keeps making a great camera even better."
"Finally Canon is acknowledging that their flagship sports DSLR still needs work."
"Now if only Canon could fix the dynamic range in a firmware update."
"Pointless, just buy a A7R II instead. DSLRs are dead."
"This level of of commitment to pros is why Canon will never lose marketshare to other brands."
"Good to see they're not charging for firmware updates like Panasonic."
"Sony <whatever> is better."
"Nikon <whatever> is better."
"Overpriced camera that still doesn't focus well."
"The best crop DSLR on the market keeps getting better."
"I had a 7D2 and it was the worst camera ever made. Now I shoot with four D810s and thirty thousand dollars of lenses."
"I had a D810 and it was the worst camera ever made. Now I shoot with the 7D2 and only these Canon lenses."
"My iPhone still focuses faster."
"No EVF, no point."
"Nikon needs to release the D400 immediately."

Yup, well aware of that and as you must know, it is without question the exception to the rule. In the 12 or so years I shot Canon (10D thru 7D), this was the one and only firmware update I can recall that added any real new functionality. Canon was effetively forced to do something given the fact that the 7D was seriously aging and its successor was still many months off. It's good to point out that there are exceptions to the rule, but clearly this particular example was very much not what a Canon user should expect. Canon's philosophy is very clear: firmware updates are primarily there to fix bugs, not to add new functionality. From what I can tell, Nikon's stance on this is very much the same.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2015 at 04:53 UTC
In reply to:

Promit: Okay, let's get a couple of the common ones out of the way, shall we?

"Canon keeps making a great camera even better."
"Finally Canon is acknowledging that their flagship sports DSLR still needs work."
"Now if only Canon could fix the dynamic range in a firmware update."
"Pointless, just buy a A7R II instead. DSLRs are dead."
"This level of of commitment to pros is why Canon will never lose marketshare to other brands."
"Good to see they're not charging for firmware updates like Panasonic."
"Sony <whatever> is better."
"Nikon <whatever> is better."
"Overpriced camera that still doesn't focus well."
"The best crop DSLR on the market keeps getting better."
"I had a 7D2 and it was the worst camera ever made. Now I shoot with four D810s and thirty thousand dollars of lenses."
"I had a D810 and it was the worst camera ever made. Now I shoot with the 7D2 and only these Canon lenses."
"My iPhone still focuses faster."
"No EVF, no point."
"Nikon needs to release the D400 immediately."

@Abrasive, there's a good reason for that. Fuji is one of VERY few manufacturers that's actually willing to add functionality via firmware updates. And, not just once, but in some cases, multiple times during the life of a camera. That's worth some enthusiasm given Canon's and Nikon's very different philosophy of only correcting bugs (such as this one) and only very rarely actually adding functionality and features.

That said, Promit definitely has too much time on his hands. :-)

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2015 at 21:42 UTC
In reply to:

Just a Photographer: I know one thing for certain.
Fuji takes care of its customers.

For a Autofocus update like this most other camera manufacturers would bring out a new body instead.

More then 40 new features have been added to the Fuji X-T1 since its introduction. No that is not bugfixes, but complete new features that weren't in the camera when it was released.

And for those that want to bash.
Then not that this camera always performed as advertised and people bought it upon the specifications as it was released.

Seems like no matter what a camera vendor does, there is always something that people will find to bitch about. The X-T1 was an extremely popular camera from the get go and remains so. People bought, used, and enjoyed the camera even without the features added in the last couple of FW updates. So, calling it an "unfinished" camera is ridiculous, IMHO. As with any complex product, there's always room for improvement. Kudos to Fuji for having a philosophy that allows for major mid cycle functionality improvements. Many of us who used Canon or Nikon cameras for years would have felt that we'd died and gone to heaven with the sort of updates that Fuji has delivered. Whine on if you wish... meanwhile, I will enjoy the new functionality and take advantage of it.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2015 at 18:14 UTC
In reply to:

Peter Bendheim: Some of you people who are actually complaining about the Fuji update saying it should have been nailed from the start are really just a bunch of over indulged, consumerist spoil brats. Fuji at least continually improve their products. This release was in all probability stuff that Fuji have learnt between the XT1 and the XT10. And pro user feedback. And Fuji has improved an already excellent product.

Honestly some of you should really just grow up somewhat. And have some gratitude.

Oh sure... holding back features that would not only differentiate the X-T1 from its direct competition but make it a more attractive alternative to DSLRs makes lots of sense... particularly in a competitive market.

Everyone loves conspiracy theories, but I have little doubt that this update, like its predecessor, evolved from user feedback, a broad base of user experiences with the camera, and some quality R&D on Fuji's part.

Link | Posted on May 12, 2015 at 00:59 UTC
In reply to:

Mikael Risedal: so many myths is spreading around
Canon is a small player regarding sensors, they have not done any big investments in new sensor lines

Canon is a proud company, in my eyes to proud, indoors sensors manufacturing and try to move to latest tech cost lot of money and also know how, something Canon doesn't have.
No patents are in the way, Toshiba, Panasonic can do the same sensors as Sony
NO Canon is lazy, they think they are still Nr1 in cmos as in year 2004, news for Canon today the Canon sensor market has only 6% of the market, Sony, Samsung et al has over 60%

Yes, PBJ (love those initials), you're right, my needs are truly unique. I mean who in their right mind would want Canon to develop a sensor that demonstrates a level of innovation that's at least on par with other manufacturers? I realize that desiring such innovation is truly unique, and I guess I'll have to live with these rather "unreasonable" requirements.

BTW, for all the "hum drum unwashed masses", I suspect that having a large collection of Canon lenses might have something to do with the difficulty in even considering a change. That might explain why shifts in market segment share come slowly in this business. But, over time, a lack of innovation in sensor technology coupled with some interesting alternatives out there will eventually catch up with Canon.

Canon's "market leading position" comes with no guarantee of permanence and Maeda's almost arrogant position towards competition doesn't strike me as a promising sign.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2015 at 17:10 UTC
In reply to:

Mikael Risedal: so many myths is spreading around
Canon is a small player regarding sensors, they have not done any big investments in new sensor lines

Canon is a proud company, in my eyes to proud, indoors sensors manufacturing and try to move to latest tech cost lot of money and also know how, something Canon doesn't have.
No patents are in the way, Toshiba, Panasonic can do the same sensors as Sony
NO Canon is lazy, they think they are still Nr1 in cmos as in year 2004, news for Canon today the Canon sensor market has only 6% of the market, Sony, Samsung et al has over 60%

Yes, this is the right way to look at this. A few fanboys here want to keep touting Canon's market share as the key indicator of success. It does certainly point to their past success, but is not indicator at all of where they will go in the future. They can only ride on their success for so long.

Canon's share of the sensor market, as you stated, is what's most concerning. It's a clear indication of their lack of innovation in that very important area, and at some point in time, this will catch up to them big time. I wish this interview had helped mollify my concerns... instead, all this corporate blather has me feeling that they really are losing their innovation and R&D mojo, at least in terms of sensor design.

Sad to see.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2015 at 22:41 UTC
In reply to:

Thoughts R Us: There is this myth that Canon has failed to innovate.

Is this true? Well, they came out with Dual Pixel AF, which is a big deal and pretty fantastic. Expect to see that on more of their lineup. They came out with the 7d ii which has the AF of their flaship model, their best metering, anti flicker mode, world class weather sealing, all for less than $2000. It's a mini 1DX, and to get these features at this price point to me is pretty innovative. They have come out with amazing lenses, all of which are class leading. No one does a better 24-70, or 70-200. Their 100-400 L II is amazing. Their new 11-24 sets new standards for an ultra wide angle zoom lens. The little 40 mm pancake is a great lens and a bargain. Their 100 L macro is best in class. And on and on with their lenses.

To me all of this represents innovation.

Canon has innovated, it's just the critics have chosen to stick with one measure of sensor performance and forget the rest.

I'm sure Canon is truly loving all the free promotion you're giving them. And it's clear from your multitude of posts that you're a huge fan. Unfortunately, you're also fast and loose with your "facts". There are other lenses out there that are easily in the same class as Canon's excellent L lenses, notably many of Fuji's offerings as just one example. Canon has an amazing collection of excellent glass, but positioning them all as "class leading" in the industry is incorrect and misleading.

People who have committed to Canon because of their excellent glass have every right to be disappointed that their sensor innovation hasn't kept up. It is reasonable to expect that innovation across all technologies should be class leading, or at the very least, equivalent to competition. In spite of your attempts to discredit concerns that others have raised, Maeda's interview does little to suggest that Canon really "gets it" when it comes to addressing their sensor shortcomings.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2015 at 22:11 UTC

I don't have a dog in this hunt any more, but I'd have to say that this interview pretty well validates some of the reasons why I decided to abandon Canon DSLRs. I don't see mirrorless blowing DSLR sales out of the water any time soon, but it's a trend that's hard to ignore, and many people (including myself) see some major market share displacement on the horizon. The feature gap between the better mirrorless cameras out there and Canon's DSLRs is shrinking and it won't take more than a generation or two for higher end mirrorless cameras to have the response and features necessary to do sports or BIF photography as well as many DSLRs (and with a decent size/weight benefit). It seems as if Canon is resting on its laurels, and this interview seems to support that view. I appreciate Mr. Maeda's candor, but I'd have to agree with others that believe that he's burying his head in the sand.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 23:53 UTC as 116th comment | 1 reply
On challenge Banana. (5 comments in total)

Great idea for a challenge. Very a-peeling. <ducking>

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 23:08 UTC as 3rd comment | 1 reply
Total: 29, showing: 1 – 20
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