Impulses

Impulses

Lives in Puerto Rico Puerto Rico
Works as a student
Joined on Apr 7, 2013

Comments

Total: 481, showing: 141 – 160
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In reply to:

Jogger: The smartphone market is pretty mature at this point and all of the components are commodity items; just the right time for Chinese brands to flood the market with low priced products.. similar to what happened with the PC market. I was going to say "cheap phones" .. but, this one uses the exact same components as flagship phones from other makes.

The only thing i dont like here is the use of Android.. its basically a direct line to the NSA.

Chinese brands flooded the PC market after it matured? Huh, that's news to me... AFAIK Lenovo (Chinese) didn't buy IBM's PC business until a few years ago (ok, 9 years ago, time flies). The brands that dominated before then, and still do, were either American (HP, Dell) or Japanese (NEC, Toshiba)...

It wasn't until somewhat recently that other Asian brands started to climb up the ladder, and Acer/ASUS are really Taiwanese so they'd probably take issue with you calling them Chinese brands. I'm really not sure what are these cheap Chinese branded PC that have flooded the market, maybe you can expand on that.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2014 at 14:19 UTC
On Samsung announces NX3000 mirrorless camera article (193 comments in total)
In reply to:

instamatic: This is impressive. A small, APS-C camera with broad wireless transfer options. Take pictures and selfies, and post almost instantly to social network sites and more importantly: to cloud galleries. This time the image quality will beat that of smartphones too. Smartphones killed the compact cameras, and actually paper prints as well for the most part. Samsung appears to embrace this inevitable trend very well - much better than the competition in my opinion.

Looking at the lens selection, it appears that all the prime lenses are there, including ultra wides (sorely missing today from the major camera brands).

A revolutionary, and much needed, mold-breaking product, and at a decent price too.

They paying you for that bit of PR speak? Pretty much all four major mirrorless formats have embraced Wi-Fi connectivity at this point and they all have ultra wides and plenty of primes... Nothing revolutionary about any of that.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2014 at 17:59 UTC
On Is it true? New service detects processed photos article (88 comments in total)

The methods they seem to use look gimmicky at best. Must be a really slow news day in the photography world...

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2014 at 16:40 UTC as 18th comment
On Is it true? New service detects processed photos article (88 comments in total)
In reply to:

stratplaya: I wonder if the results would be admissible in a court of law, either civil or criminal.

Clearly not... I hope you weren't serious.

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2014 at 16:36 UTC
On Is it true? New service detects processed photos article (88 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mark Banas: It seems to accept, and trust, falsified EXIF info (via EXIFtool) with no problem, so my Pentax K-5 must actually be a 16MP Nikon D800? Not terribly sophisticated service...

Did you actually modify the image and not just edit the EXIF tho?

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2014 at 16:35 UTC
On FlashQ: The little cube for flash photography article (56 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jogger: errr.. cool concept, but, no to kickstarter. most of them fail and for the successful ones, the originators sell off to the highest bidder, keeping all the profits (e.g. Oculus) and leaving the backers with half-@$$ dev products.

let me know when there is a product that i can buy.

Oh yeah, forgot to mention Pressy on the first post, another very mechanical doodad. Haven't received it yet but they're on track for shipping this month, one more relatively simple product that just needed manufacturing funds.

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2014 at 16:25 UTC
On FlashQ: The little cube for flash photography article (56 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jogger: errr.. cool concept, but, no to kickstarter. most of them fail and for the successful ones, the originators sell off to the highest bidder, keeping all the profits (e.g. Oculus) and leaving the backers with half-@$$ dev products.

let me know when there is a product that i can buy.

Oh and on topic, this seems like a reasonable campaign tho I'd have to take a closer look. The other thing people don't pay attention to is how much engineering and prototyping has been done before the campaign. A lot of campaigns are started on dreams and ideas, I wouldn't bother with that. If the people behind the product already have working prototypes or designs and just need help with manufacturing, that's a different story.

Most of the ones I've invested in fall in the latter category (ClearShot, Pressy, etc). There were Oculus prototypes out there but c'mon, it was obvious that thing had a long way to go.

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2014 at 16:23 UTC
On FlashQ: The little cube for flash photography article (56 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jogger: errr.. cool concept, but, no to kickstarter. most of them fail and for the successful ones, the originators sell off to the highest bidder, keeping all the profits (e.g. Oculus) and leaving the backers with half-@$$ dev products.

let me know when there is a product that i can buy.

Speaking from personal experience or do you have some data to back up that claim? Personally, I've participated in half a dozen successful Kickstarts, but I go for more reasonable projects and not stuff that's more far out like Oculus. My Meenova microUSB OTG reader, the Clearshot card sized phone stand, and even Tim Schaffer's new game all seemed to have far better prospects from the start.

I was actually skeptic of Pebble, one of their bigger success stories, because of the complexity of project. Any time you're investing in software PLUS hardware development you're putting a lot of faith on campaign. I actually didn't jump on the Pebble, almost bought one later tho. Bug A Salt (salt gun for insects) and MrSpeakers Alpha Dogs were other successful campaigns I kept my eye on.

The thing that a lot of those have in common is that they were either for very simple very mechanical products (Bug A Salt, Clearshot, Meenova, even the Alpha Dogs), or they had a relatively small team behind them with a proven track record (Tim Schaefer). MrSpeakers already had a successful business modifying planar magnetic headphones by hand, the campaign was simply to get funds for 3D printing more precise and better engineered cups.

I'd say there's a lot of highly successful campaigns that resulted in a clever and original product. I don't have any numbers on the overall success rate, I think people definitely get sucked in by the hype surrounding more ambitious campaigns tho. Things like Pebble and Oculus are a 50/50 shot at best IMO. Pebble itself might not even survive the Android Wear onslaught.

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2014 at 16:19 UTC
In reply to:

JEROME NOLAS: Will somebody make a 24mm (36mm eqv.) f 1.8 (2.8) for APS-C DSLR instead? This is insane, it seems that all people are shooting at night or caring about the "creamy bokeh."

He said DSLR... Every mirrorless mount has a lens like that.

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2014 at 19:09 UTC

That 35/0.95 for MFT/mirrorless APS-C looks pretty hefty, tho I guess it's not much larger than the MFT Voigtlaenders. Not for me but I'm surprised it's rarely mentioned, seems it's been out a few years?

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2014 at 18:44 UTC as 27th comment
On Samsung NX Mini real-world samples gallery article (143 comments in total)
In reply to:

bluevellet: My biggest issue with the NX mini is not IQ, sensor size or specs, but simply that Samsung now has two mirrorless mounts. At best, it will be two mounts with so-so support. I just wish Samsung had better thought out its entry in the mirrorless market by either choosing APS-C or the mini route and stuck with it in the long run.

More mounts is a larger endeavor no doubt, but it also shows an increased commitment to the market in general and it's no different than half the other manufacturers... Sony is up to three mounts I think and four or five sensor formats? CaNikon both "support" three sensor formats and several mounts...

The only ones sorta committed to a single consumer level mount are Fuji, Oly, and Panasonic no? They also have the broadest lens range so I guess you can make the argument either way, but I don't think Samsung would hold back Mini cause of NX or vice versa (unlike other manufacturers). Besides, if the goal is a truly tiny system how many lenses do you need to put out to make it attractive...

Long teles ands fast zooms might be interesting to some but probably best left to NX, that cuts a lot of it down right there... If they release a few key primes, and an UWA or macro, they can easily test the waters without a major commitment. If there's one thing Samsung is decent at it's throwing everything at the wall to see what sticks, doesn't have to be great out of the gate.

M4/3 user here btw, largely cause of the lens selection.

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2014 at 18:36 UTC
On National Park Service bans drones in Yosemite article (170 comments in total)
In reply to:

tkbslc: I think there should be a *limited* number of *restrictive* permits available for drone flyovers. There are just angles and views of these beautiful landscapes that only a drone can capture. Let's be honest, we really haven't seen any new angles of this park since Ansel shot it.

But I totally agree with banning the general public from using drones at will. That would be problematic, to say the least.

I think they're more concerned with the park's safety than your your own... Drones are already usable in populated areas as long as you're under X altitude etc (where the FAA gets involved). Seems unlikely they'd wall off a huge swatch of parkland cause there's a drone flying over when it's way less likely to cause an accident in way more densely populated zones. They're probably scared of people miss using them, chasing birds, getting to close to nests, crashing and causing fires or disturbing animals, nevermind more nefarious remote control uses they're ill equipped to stop or track.

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2014 at 18:18 UTC
On Samsung NX Mini real-world samples gallery article (143 comments in total)

It'll be interesting to see how pricing develops... I'm kinda surprised Samsung hasn't flexed it's huge marketing muscle to push their ILCs harder, after all, marketing is the #1 reason they currently sell twice as many smartphones as anyone else (and many times more than most other Android OEM).

The first Galaxy phone was small when big screens were starting to get trendy, and had tons of issues (GPS), second one was thinner and more appealing but still not a breakthrough or a standout, yet by the third the Galaxy the brand had huge recognition already (and they'd managed to muscle carriers away from carrier specific models/branding).

I've seen Samsung kiosks at Best Buy and whatnot with decent NX displays (larger and more prominent than NEX/Alpha at this point, in the store that is), but not much outside of that. If there is ONE company in the mirrorless game with the capacity and incentive to bring this whole category of cameras out of obscurity it's Samsung.

P.S. I'm not a Samsung fan by any means btw, happy M4/3 user here and I've had Nokia, Sony, HTC, and LG/Nexus phones but never Samsung. I'm also pretty disappointed in their Android camera range, there's potential there but it's wholly squandered unless it's a more open system (software wise). Hard to ignore their unique strengths tho.

Direct link | Posted on May 5, 2014 at 21:32 UTC as 7th comment
On Samsung NX Mini real-world samples gallery article (143 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peiasdf: Who is going to buy this when those fools that bought into NX got burned after a few short years?

I don't think they're abandoning NX, are they?

Direct link | Posted on May 5, 2014 at 21:13 UTC
On Leica T (Typ 701) First Impressions Review preview (2307 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joel Halbert: I just posted a take on the "lie" accusation, if anyone cares to read it, in
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/53611119
though I realize it's par for the course to throw mud.

A common misconception, if you read these comments, is that software correction is a "cheat" that can make a bad lens good - not so at all - and that companies with high morals don't cheat, so a truly ethical firm will deliver an expensive multi-element lens instead of a cheaper, simpler lens plus software "cheats". If these people would just stop and think logically for a moment, perhaps they'd see the glaring flaws in this reasoning. See the referenced post for more.

I often wonder why these same people don't demand that their car engines should run well (or even run at all) if the engine management computer were disabled. It's part of the engineering solution, and in today's market it's not an option to do without, but it doesn't mean there are no justifications for costly engine builds vs. cheap ones.

That's fine, the smarter posters don't have an issue with software corrections... They have an issue with Leica passing off a relatively cheap, slow, Japanese made kit zoom that isn't even stabilized as some kinda premium lens worth a couple grand. It actually makes the T's body price seem downright reasonable by comparison.

Direct link | Posted on May 3, 2014 at 23:21 UTC

The one in DC looked like it was closed from the outside even when it WAS open, never mind that they never even changed the large sign from Penn to Calumet... Ritz and Ace had much better stock in smaller spaces tho. I imagine rent inside the city wasn't cheap, that's the other often overlooked end of the vice squeezing these B&M stores

Direct link | Posted on May 2, 2014 at 20:45 UTC as 14th comment
On Leica T (Typ 701) First Impressions Review preview (2307 comments in total)
In reply to:

bakhtyar kurdi: Thanks Dpreview, so as I told you in early comments this is a $75 lens that they want to sell it for $2000.

And they even said it included no IS because it compromises IQ, hah! Honestly, the body is priced high but not obnoxiously so, despite the ridiculous value placed on hand polishing etc etc. The lenses however, I just don't get.

Direct link | Posted on May 2, 2014 at 20:41 UTC
On Leica T (Typ 701) First Impressions Review preview (2307 comments in total)
In reply to:

msdeneen: It is certainly interesting to see a new Leica camera. What I don't understand at all is all the chatter in reviews about the "solid aluminum body." There's no achievement of merit there. An CNC machine can spit these out in minutes. What's the perceived virtue or value of this? It's far more difficult to mate multiple precision pieces into a whole body than it is to hog out a block of aluminum.

I don't see this body having any special characteristics that relate to taking pictures.

But it IS an aluminum body shell spat out by a machine, it's actually not that different in assembly from an iPhone (which is manufactured by the cheapest Asian labor available)... Components then screen, easy does it. So they hand polish the shell for X amount of minutes to claim a higher degree of hand labor or because they didn't update their production methods, so what.

Direct link | Posted on May 2, 2014 at 20:35 UTC
On Leica T (Typ 701) First Impressions Review preview (2307 comments in total)
In reply to:

Clint009: Some people here prefer
24MP Full Frame Leica Max CMOS Sensor
Leica Maestro Image Processor
3.0" LCD with 920,000 pixels
Full HD 1080p Video
Well there is a Leica that seem to fit your need. But the price goes with quality.

$6950 (body only) " Leica M Digital Rangefinder Camera Body" http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/893170-USA/Leica_10770_M_Digital_Camera_Black.html

That's mean, this "Leica T" is a cheap price.

No, no, I'm not rich at all for the M model, but the "T" look fine with me!

Unibody aluminum construction alone doesn't excuse the price, or even half of it...

Apple's wares are generally NOT considered cheap (the Air is decidedly overpriced these days given it's outdated display) and they sell systems milled out of aluminum blocks starting at $900, pretty sure those laptops require larger aluminum blanks to begin with and the Intel/flash components inside aren't cheap. It's not like you can blame it on economies of scale either, Apple has a tiny share of the computer industry... Other OEMs have stepped up with similar builds in recent years ands they have an even smaller overall share.

Hand polishing is a silly excuse for a price point, as was the reasoning behind the lens prices apparently. I get that a Ferrari 458 is never gonna sell for the same price as a Ford Mustang; but at least you can plainly trace the degree of engineering, performance, and component costs that drive up the 458's price even if they don't wholly excuse it. These are tools, not pieces of art, beautiful and often hand crafted tools maybe, but still tools.

Direct link | Posted on May 2, 2014 at 20:31 UTC
On Sony SLT-A77 II First Impressions Review preview (672 comments in total)
In reply to:

Candle11: What is the future of Sony A-Mount System? are there anymore lenses and equipment coming out?

And FF A, and APSC E? Sony has a lot of balls in the air right now... Wonder if they are just gonna let the market decide.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2014 at 17:31 UTC
Total: 481, showing: 141 – 160
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