Impulses

Impulses

Lives in Puerto Rico Puerto Rico
Works as a student
Joined on Apr 7, 2013

Comments

Total: 751, showing: 41 – 60
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On article Sony finalizes buyout of Toshiba's sensor business (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

Impulses: " Except for Canon and Samsung, both of which manufacture their own APS-C and larger sensors, every other camera manufacturer, including Nikon, will now pretty much have to rely on Sony. "

Uhh, Panasonic has used their own sensors in all M4/3 bodies over the last couple years but one IIRC (GH3?). AFAIK they still hold a 49% stake in the sensor manufacturing business they built and probably still design them from the ground up.

Also, rumors keep percolating about where Samsung's camera assets may end up... I'd be surprised if they sold the actual sensor manufacturing division tho since that's probably more lucrative than camera's themselves but at the same time not something a smaller company might be able to take on.

Keeping fabs running thru demand is the only way to make the huge initial investment in them profitable (as well as offsetting the costs to keep manufacturing processes up to date).

" Sony does make 16 and 20 megapixel Four Thirds sensors, so you never know. "

Yeah, and those seem to do better with regards to noise and hot pixels within long exposures too... The bodies that don't (including the E-M1) all seem to give us some educated guesses about what had a Sony v Panasonic sensor on current gen bodies. No clue what's on the GX8 tho, or who'll fab whatever results from Panasonic + Toshiba's organic sensor R&D, seems like it's ongoing tho.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 7, 2015 at 06:35 UTC
On article Sony finalizes buyout of Toshiba's sensor business (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

Impulses: " Except for Canon and Samsung, both of which manufacture their own APS-C and larger sensors, every other camera manufacturer, including Nikon, will now pretty much have to rely on Sony. "

Uhh, Panasonic has used their own sensors in all M4/3 bodies over the last couple years but one IIRC (GH3?). AFAIK they still hold a 49% stake in the sensor manufacturing business they built and probably still design them from the ground up.

Also, rumors keep percolating about where Samsung's camera assets may end up... I'd be surprised if they sold the actual sensor manufacturing division tho since that's probably more lucrative than camera's themselves but at the same time not something a smaller company might be able to take on.

Keeping fabs running thru demand is the only way to make the huge initial investment in them profitable (as well as offsetting the costs to keep manufacturing processes up to date).

They (Panasonic) did use Sony's 1" sensor tho, so I guess That statement wasn't as inaccurate as I tried to paint it. Samsung makes 1" sensors too, as do others... Hopefully we end up with more variety and not a Sony stranglehold in the future, that can't be good for the market regardless of how good their product is.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2015 at 21:05 UTC
On article Sony finalizes buyout of Toshiba's sensor business (91 comments in total)

" Except for Canon and Samsung, both of which manufacture their own APS-C and larger sensors, every other camera manufacturer, including Nikon, will now pretty much have to rely on Sony. "

Uhh, Panasonic has used their own sensors in all M4/3 bodies over the last couple years but one IIRC (GH3?). AFAIK they still hold a 49% stake in the sensor manufacturing business they built and probably still design them from the ground up.

Also, rumors keep percolating about where Samsung's camera assets may end up... I'd be surprised if they sold the actual sensor manufacturing division tho since that's probably more lucrative than camera's themselves but at the same time not something a smaller company might be able to take on.

Keeping fabs running thru demand is the only way to make the huge initial investment in them profitable (as well as offsetting the costs to keep manufacturing processes up to date).

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2015 at 21:01 UTC as 26th comment | 8 replies
On article PIX 2015: Robert Hurt and the hidden universe (59 comments in total)
In reply to:

alcaher: Too much technology, computers and spaceships,NASA uses ..an yet they are not able to tell us the real beauty and mistery of their main subjet of study: "the universe", something that old civilizations like Egipt or the mayas did.

@Karroly/damian English isn't my first language either, nor was it the point of my sarcastic post. I assure I'm quite calm, I was just pointing out the irony of his nonsensical rambling. Sarcasm is universal, but I guess that's neither here nor there. You actually agree with his criticism of NASA?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2015 at 02:17 UTC
On article PIX 2015: Robert Hurt and the hidden universe (59 comments in total)
In reply to:

alcaher: Too much technology, computers and spaceships,NASA uses ..an yet they are not able to tell us the real beauty and mistery of their main subjet of study: "the universe", something that old civilizations like Egipt or the mayas did.

Too much ego, sense of self importance, and incoherent rambling employed by alcaher... And yet, he's unable to spare us from the most basic but egregious grammar offenses before hitting post, something that anyone with a middle school education can do.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 29, 2015 at 22:20 UTC
In reply to:

RStyga: I don't like NX1 (subjective) but I admit that it's a very powerful camera. Also, NX500 is an excellent and compact DSLM, minus EVF, with perhaps the best APS-C sensor on the market. Samsung's camera division should try to stay afloat and ride the retail storm out; they have really good photo products and deserve to keep making them. Personally, I support them by owing a few.

There's a ton of assets in the division that I don't see Samsung moving anywhere, none of the smaller players could buy it out for what it's really worth, and Sony or Canikon wouldn't bother... I guess if Matsushita decided to double down on cameras or something it'd be plausible, just doesn't seem likely.

Maybe Samsung will pull out and refocus, they already went smaller with a 1" ILC and it didn't make waves, maybe FF? Less need to develop a lens catalogue overnight if they follow Sony's lead there, I'd love to see an A7 competitor, and it doesn't look like Canikon will make a mirrorless FF body any time soon so... The window is now.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2015 at 10:25 UTC
In reply to:

zavart: Oh , and one more thing . Samsung should have joined the MFT group, especially since they didn't have a large selection of lenses to begin with . This would have been a smart move because people right now more than ever are looking for lighter cameras and lenses and it would give them opportunity to be part of the successful group rather than lone loser with the dead end system ! At least people could have risked buying their cameras knowing that in the worst case scenario they could have always buy lenses and accessories from other MTF makers !

I look forward to APS-C's death, maybe then FF bodies will be more affordable and I can splurge on one (plus a couple primes) to complement my MFT system...

However the reality is Canikon probably still sell more APS-C bodies in the consumer space than FF + MFT sales combined, so even if it were to happen it'd be an exceedingly slow process that would hurt the market overall.

I'd love to know how many E mount vs FE A7 bodies Sony has sold this year tho, that'd be as good an indicator of the status quo as any other dubious metric.

My guess is a6000's low pricing and frequent sales still keep those numbers quite healthy.

Even if Sony starts clawing away marketshare from Canikon, they've already realized Canikon's strategy works wonders, and they now have a usable but not fully fleshed out crop system they can string along while tempting people into their halo FF system.

Only way any of this changes is if Fuji or MFT somehow become a lot more popular (cough marketing) or if Canikon start taking mirrorless seriously.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2015 at 10:16 UTC
In reply to:

Impulses: Seems like a lot of the usage cases for Post Focus would be much better served by focus bracketing of full res RAWs; something all recent Olympus OM-D bodies will soon be able to do, and something all semi recent Panasonic bodies can already do albeit thru the use of Wi-Fi and an app on the Play store.

Portraiture would certainly benefit from the faster 30fps rate of Post Focus, but for macro work & landscapes bracketing and stacking with no resolution or compression limitations seems far more useful. So, how about a piece on that multi-brand feature?

The tedious part would be necessary for most of the uses described here anyway, Panasonic doesn't do any in-body stacking... One of the OM-Ds actually does this now but I haven't seen any tests yet. There's various programs that make it fairly easy in post tho. fps ends up being the biggest advantage, at the cost of resolution/IQ.

Like I said, some usage cases will benefit from one approach vs the other, as a whole the scenarios involving stacking (regardless of whether it was done thru bracketing or Panasonic's leveraging of 4K) seem far more interesting than those simply involving a delayed choice of focus point... As evidenced by the examples the article highlighted.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2015 at 08:42 UTC
On article Video Field Test: Theron Humphrey and the Sony A7R II (188 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stefan66: Very nice! I soon forgot that it was a Sony-specific test as I enjoyed wathing you guys go about shooting and filming. I think we all can agree that the A7 rII is a fantastic piece of technology even if most of us will never afford to get one or it´s Ziess lenses. I am really looking forward to the weekend and getting my own gear out, even though it´s "just" my beloved Olympus m43 camera. Thank you for inspiring me!

Heh, if I had 5 grand to spare I'd be all over that A7R II + 35mm Distagon combo... Tho in all likelihood I'd still prefer MFT when opting for zooms since they're positively tiny by comparison. Maybe one day I'll pick up an A7 and some primes, at the pace Sony is going they're definitely on track to leave a trail of old models on clearance out there...

Video itself was definitely a good watch, frankly it's one of the least spec focused field tests so I dunno what others are complaining about.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2015 at 06:18 UTC

Seems like a lot of the usage cases for Post Focus would be much better served by focus bracketing of full res RAWs; something all recent Olympus OM-D bodies will soon be able to do, and something all semi recent Panasonic bodies can already do albeit thru the use of Wi-Fi and an app on the Play store.

Portraiture would certainly benefit from the faster 30fps rate of Post Focus, but for macro work & landscapes bracketing and stacking with no resolution or compression limitations seems far more useful. So, how about a piece on that multi-brand feature?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 26, 2015 at 19:02 UTC as 23rd comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

lattesweden: The Olympus focus stacking/bracketing firmware update that will arrive tomorrow for the E-M1 and focus bracketing firmware update for the E-M5mkII (the E-M10mkII alreade has it) should more or less do the same but with 16 Mpix (and also RAW support) but with a lower frame rate (around 9 fps I think it is) than the Panasonic 4K-video version with 30 fps.

It'd be interesting to compare the viability of focus bracketing vs Post Focus IMO, focus bracketing deserves at least it's own article, and it's also doable on any Panasonic body thru the use of an app on the Play store.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 26, 2015 at 18:55 UTC
In reply to:

p5freak: You can achieve the same result if you take normal photos (at full res) with different focus points. Its focus stacking, basically. It only works well for static scenes, the pictures must be exactly the same. The leaves in the church example moved because of wind, thats why there is motion blur in the stacked image.

There's actually an app on the Play store which will do automated focus bracketing at a fairly fast clip, certainly usable hand held if you can juggle both phone and camera.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 26, 2015 at 18:54 UTC
On article Panasonic's Post Focus feature arrives November 25 (218 comments in total)

Hmm, Olympus' focus bracketing or even the app in the Play store for focus bracketing with all Panasonics seems more interesting... Tho I guess this is more useful hand held, at the expense of resolution.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2015 at 19:33 UTC as 59th comment
On article 4K video: What you need to know (285 comments in total)
In reply to:

fastlass: Honestly, whenever I rent a movie on amazon I only choose SD, and my screen does 1080. I can tell the difference, but it really doesn't affect my perception of the film. I'd rather spend the extra dollar on some nachos.

Walking Dead is often filled with grain and other effects that seem to cut down sharpness and evoke a gritter more tattered look anyway... I'm sure zombie guts fly out much better in HD tho! :p

Direct link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 06:05 UTC
On article 4K video: What you need to know (285 comments in total)
In reply to:

spitfire31: Was this produced in 24 point font and L-O-T-S of S--P--A--C--E for reading challenged kiddies?

One glance, and I'll never bother with any of your "sponsored" material again. It deprecates the whole image of DPReview.

Bad move.

/Joachim

I read it thru, and didn't mind the font, didn't really learn anything new but I imagine it's pretty informative for anyone that hasn't read anything about 4K. The Panasonic slant wasn't too strong, although there was no mention of the downsides of 4K Photo while pushing it (higher compression and rolling shutter distortion due to the electronic shutter). The page did stutter a bit on my phone, it's a little design heavy regardless of the aesthetics.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 06:01 UTC
In reply to:

happypoppeye: There is very little benefit shooting in RAW these days and its easier for a company to handle jpegs. Plus, jpegs are almost just as editable.

But those adjustments are easily undone or checked for on a RAW file. The same process takes considerable analysis on a JPEG... People act like every RAW shooter is an HDR crazed post processing maven... Here's a news flash, almost every modern ILC can generate in camera JPEG with multi frame HDR composition, amongst a ton of other things...

This policy would have absolutely zero impact on that.

Forget HDR, cameras can generate focus stacked JPEGs, or panos, or light/bulb composites... Some of those modes can easily be exploited to tell half truths, like long exposures which hide any moving people in the frame, or certain lights. It'd be harder to detect that on a composite out of body JPEG than separate RAWs.

If they're really trying to keep photographers honest they're going the wrong way about it.

OOC JPEG + RAW would actually make much more sense, and they can accept or reject whatever has been edited, which they can more readily track on a RAW. Or, you know actually trust pros and don't let a couple incidents paint the whole bunch as dishonest.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2015 at 23:48 UTC

How is it harder to hide changes on a JPEG? Shouldn't it be the other way around? If you're sending a RAW + sidecar or DNG then Reuters can undo every single change in a couple clicks, if you send a JPEG they have no idea what's changed unless they spend considerable time analyzing. I'm confused... I mean, they accept cropped JPEGs and that's possibly one of the most destructive and potentially deceitful edits, and they have absolutely no way of looking beyond the crop.

I mean, I don't think it's a big deal one way or the other.Outside of sports and some other action there's little downside to shooting JPEG+RAW (smaller buffer is the only real downside), and JPEG are quicker to move around... But this raises so many questions. What about in camera RAW conversion? Heck, these days JPEG can be heavily cooked IN camera with bodies that do HDR, have all manner of JPEG profile telling, and are even starting to feature focus stacking and post capture focus selection.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2015 at 23:39 UTC as 58th comment
In reply to:

Don Kiyoti: This is clearly about the growing problem of some unethical photographers altering the content of their images by adding or deleting elements. There have been some well-publicized cases of this happening. Sometimes it's to "improve" the image by removing something distracting but otherwise unimportant. In other cases it's been to make the image tell a different story, and that's what Reuters can't tolerate.

Despite the wording of the announcement, this has nothing to do with speed. It's all about the integrity of the scene.

How is it harder to hide changes on a JPEG? Shouldn't it be the other way around? If you're sending a RAW + sidecar or DNG then Reuters can undo every single change in a couple clicks, if you send a JPEG they have no idea what's changed unless they spend considerable time analyzing. I'm confused... I mean, they accept cropped JPEGs and that's possibly one of the most destructive and potentially deceitful edits, and they have absolutely no way of looking beyond the crop.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2015 at 23:34 UTC
On article 2015 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $800-$1200 (156 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael Ma: Are all m43 raw files disgustingly difficult to work with in ACR (in terms of skin tone)? As much as I like my m43 camera, when working with portraits, my 7 year old Canon is much easier to work with.

You'd have to be more specific, Panasonic used to get a bad rap for it's JPEG engine years ago, not sure what difficulty you could be having of working with RAWs tho.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 17, 2015 at 14:40 UTC
On article 2015 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $800-$1200 (156 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alan Brown: Pentax AF 'still' inconsistent?

I'm surprised that this comment is still their 'problem' from magazine articles during film days. I recently got my brother in law's Pentax DSLr off him to see if I could source his memory card issues (losing all of his photos) I thought the AF was very snappy.. perhaps I didn't have it long enough to see 'inconsistency?

Inconsistent is a vague description.. Wonder how it manifests itself? I dare not ask in the Pentax forum as a Nikon user :)

They might be referring to how the lens lineup behaves inconsistently as far as keeping up with the body's AF capabilities... Just a guess.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 17, 2015 at 14:37 UTC
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