PIX 2015
The Squire

The Squire

Lives in United Kingdom Bath, United Kingdom
Works as a Professional Coffee Drinker and Pixel Manipulator
Joined on Mar 30, 2007

Comments

Total: 366, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

MikeFairbanks: I had the original Theta 360 (won it from Ricoh), but I simply could not handle the poor quality of the images. It drove me mad. I even did HDRs to try to get rid of the noise in the photos, and learned to edit as much as possible while still retaining the coding necessary to keep it spherical.

After about a month I gave it away.

I wonder how much better the newer one will be. It needs to have the quality that is at least as good as what our phones can do these days. The original Theta had the image quality of the old flip phones. It was pretty bad, even in good light.

Has anyone seen any samples from the camera yet? I'm very interested in it (if it's good).

Thanks

Ah, good point. All these guys have their own 360degree hosting sites. They probably don't want them stuffed with 50Mbps files!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2015 at 13:03 UTC
In reply to:

MikeFairbanks: I had the original Theta 360 (won it from Ricoh), but I simply could not handle the poor quality of the images. It drove me mad. I even did HDRs to try to get rid of the noise in the photos, and learned to edit as much as possible while still retaining the coding necessary to keep it spherical.

After about a month I gave it away.

I wonder how much better the newer one will be. It needs to have the quality that is at least as good as what our phones can do these days. The original Theta had the image quality of the old flip phones. It was pretty bad, even in good light.

Has anyone seen any samples from the camera yet? I'm very interested in it (if it's good).

Thanks

The consumer implementation of BluRay's AVC is around 20Mbps (up to 24Mbps I believe), but actual BluRays will have content encoded at up to 40-50Mbps.

iPhones since the iPhone4 have used variable 24Mbps codecs.

Most Sony consumer gear of the last couple of years have offered 50Mbps.

I dunno. 16Mbps seems very low for a product released in 2015.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2015 at 12:05 UTC
In reply to:

MikeFairbanks: I had the original Theta 360 (won it from Ricoh), but I simply could not handle the poor quality of the images. It drove me mad. I even did HDRs to try to get rid of the noise in the photos, and learned to edit as much as possible while still retaining the coding necessary to keep it spherical.

After about a month I gave it away.

I wonder how much better the newer one will be. It needs to have the quality that is at least as good as what our phones can do these days. The original Theta had the image quality of the old flip phones. It was pretty bad, even in good light.

Has anyone seen any samples from the camera yet? I'm very interested in it (if it's good).

Thanks

1080p at 16Mbps?

2007 is on the phone. They want their video codec back.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2015 at 10:54 UTC
In reply to:

aliasfox: This, a drone, and some proper laws would mean Google could do Streetview an order of magnitude (or two) cheaper than it does now.

Automated drones following Google maps down streets, smart enough to avoid cars and people.

That would be cool.

Also, could be used by the Empire to find the droids they are looking for.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2015 at 08:56 UTC
In reply to:

solarsky: If Ricoh were to use two of these new 25 MP Sony multi-format mobile phone camera modules from the Xperia Z5 Premium, they could produce a 29 MP 360° image output, going by the way they will be using images of both modules at the current state of operation. That would be a very attractive resolution.

We wish. And 4k video too.

But its not just about the sensor. You'd need the processing and battery to back up all those pixels. I'd love it, but others might object to the cost and bigger body needed.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2015 at 08:54 UTC
In reply to:

MikeFairbanks: I had the original Theta 360 (won it from Ricoh), but I simply could not handle the poor quality of the images. It drove me mad. I even did HDRs to try to get rid of the noise in the photos, and learned to edit as much as possible while still retaining the coding necessary to keep it spherical.

After about a month I gave it away.

I wonder how much better the newer one will be. It needs to have the quality that is at least as good as what our phones can do these days. The original Theta had the image quality of the old flip phones. It was pretty bad, even in good light.

Has anyone seen any samples from the camera yet? I'm very interested in it (if it's good).

Thanks

Agreed. I love the idea but the samples I saw from the original Theta look terrible.

14MP stills is starting to get interesting, but disappointing it's still only 1080p (at an unspecified bit rate). For 360 degrees you need a lot of pixels for it to look good. 4K @100mbps FTW!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2015 at 08:47 UTC
In reply to:

bernardf12: At least it has 14 Bit RAW. The only problem with the system is that there is no IBIS or stabilized primes.

Someone should tell Canon that people use cameras without tripods, and that people like fast inexpensive primes with circular apertures.

14 bit RAW is wasted on Canon's dynamic range.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 27, 2015 at 07:57 UTC
On Sony Alpha 7R II: Real-world ISO invariance study article (369 comments in total)

Great analysis DPR.

If I could afford an a7rii I don't think this would be much of a problem for me. If I can underexpose by a couple of EVs then push that without seeing artifacts, I'll be very happy.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 24, 2015 at 16:37 UTC as 91st comment

That's pretty quick for Apple. Good news.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2015 at 00:56 UTC as 6th comment
On Samsung introduces PM1633a, world's first 2.5" 16TB SSD article (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

dwill23: I read some comments and the same ol and ol comes up again and again. "Too much capacity is too risky to use". I call HOGWASH on that.

When I sold 32MB (yes mega byte) CF cards for $100 at Ritz camera NO ONE DARED to buy the 64MB cards and the 96MB cards for the exact same fear. "I might lose everything if the card fails".

Now a days we have photographers not wanting 128GB when they USED to be scared to dead of 64GB. This is an endless silliness that I'm so sick of.

True. I've had branded (but a cheaper brand) cards fall apart on me after fairly light use. At least you can *see* it happening rather than it simple not working one day.
Physical strain on a card is an important factor. One of the reasons I'd recommend one big card rather than several small cards - less swapping and, for some of my cameras, I just plug in a micro SD cable to download files instead of popping the card.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 18, 2015 at 18:46 UTC
On Samsung introduces PM1633a, world's first 2.5" 16TB SSD article (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

forpetessake: Nice. If you have a high-res. modern camera that can survive 100000 shutter actuations and you save every raw file, this drive would outlast 4 or more such cameras.

Would make sense to backup to a HDD, for cost purposes. Two of these SSDs would be a real luxury!

Direct link | Posted on Aug 18, 2015 at 18:28 UTC
On Samsung introduces PM1633a, world's first 2.5" 16TB SSD article (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

Vergilius: Now Samsung needs to work on something that will lengthen the life span of anyone who would fill one of these things with photos. They'll need the extra time just to look at all of them.

The workload on an SSD from photography will barely wear the drive at all. Dont worry about longevity unless you're putting this in a server that's grinding data 24/7.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 18, 2015 at 18:26 UTC
On Samsung introduces PM1633a, world's first 2.5" 16TB SSD article (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

dwill23: I read some comments and the same ol and ol comes up again and again. "Too much capacity is too risky to use". I call HOGWASH on that.

When I sold 32MB (yes mega byte) CF cards for $100 at Ritz camera NO ONE DARED to buy the 64MB cards and the 96MB cards for the exact same fear. "I might lose everything if the card fails".

Now a days we have photographers not wanting 128GB when they USED to be scared to dead of 64GB. This is an endless silliness that I'm so sick of.

@dwill23 People have counter productove opinions about storage. They think using several cards means the risk of losing files is lower. Actually it just means the risk of losing *some* files is much higher than when you just use one card.

Whether it's SD cards or SSD drives. Keep it simple and back up. Always backup.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 18, 2015 at 18:25 UTC
On War Rigs: The tech used to shoot Mad Max: Fury Road article (53 comments in total)

DO any pro photogs make use of green-screen for otherwise traditional still portraits? Or is it unnecessary because for stills it's easy enough to deal with the background in PS?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2015 at 13:17 UTC as 15th comment | 5 replies
On War Rigs: The tech used to shoot Mad Max: Fury Road article (53 comments in total)
In reply to:

Danny: Just give me old school special fx, somehow all this computer stuff doesn't do much good. Like the old Star Wars movies, all done with scale models and matte-paintings for backgrounds, somehow it just feels more real and less over-the-top. As for Mad Max, I still think Mad Max II is awesome.

The subtler CGI improvements to the original starswars improve it significantly IMHO (*not* all the overlayed additional CGI characters though). And while CGI characters do look a bit rubbish in the digital enhanced versions, so do the muppets used in the original!

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2015 at 13:16 UTC
On Corel releases ParticleShop brush plugin for Photoshop article (73 comments in total)

I wish I could buy this for a subscription price that also requires a frequent internet connection to verify my license.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 12, 2015 at 21:37 UTC as 28th comment | 1 reply

Looks great. 960fps is perhaps a bit too low res, but the rest are surprisingly good, as a trade-off for frame rate.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 11, 2015 at 22:29 UTC as 11th comment

Camera looks great. Amazing detail.

Not sure about the lens used though - Lots of 'orrible CA fringing going on in several of those shot up the mountain and the dancing dude.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2015 at 08:32 UTC as 58th comment | 1 reply

ISO6400 looks like a bit of a stretch. Emergency use only. Expect to see some nice ISO1600 and 3200 as even my RX100Mk1 was great at those settings.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 3, 2015 at 21:34 UTC as 24th comment
In reply to:

The Squire: If the idea is to replace system RAM with this tech it better be *much* more than 1,000 more resilient than current NAND, because it'll be hit a lot lot more frequently than if it were just used as an alternative to SSD.

That said, in cameras it will work well, as buffer memory is written to infrequently (compared to the main RAM of a PC). The distinction between buffer and card will be removed (assuming someone standardizes a very fast interface to this memory tech).

@ProfHankD I guess for a lot of application, particularly devices, comms, IoT, rather than general purpose computers, the architecture could shift to something like the latest Intel CPUs with a fairly small/fast eDRAM on-CPU, then everything else in XPoint. That would support a lot of use cases where data is created, processed and flows to storage, where there isnt a need for large and varied data processing in-memory.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 30, 2015 at 08:06 UTC
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