ozarktroutfisher

ozarktroutfisher

Lives in United States Hot Springs, AR, United States
Works as a Engineer
Joined on Dec 31, 2005
About me:

D200, D50, 17-55 f2.8, 70-200 f2.8 VR, 300 f2.8 AF-S II, 80-200 f2.8, 18-70 DX, SB-800, SB400, Coolpix 5400, N90s, CB Junior Flash Bracket, Manfrotto 475 Tripod, Manfrotto 468 Ballhead, Manfrotto 681B Monopod, LowePro Nature Trekker AW II Backpack

Comments

Total: 7, showing: 1 – 7
On Nikon D810 Preview preview (1571 comments in total)
In reply to:

tgutgu: This camera shows that DSLRs and especially Nikon are stuck in an innovation plateau. Same old fat design, huge. Too many people get tired lugging this stuff around. Nikon must listen to the mirrorless bandwagon or it will be in big trouble.

I completely disagree. I for one absolutely hate using small cameras. I bought my daughter a Nikon D5200 and used it recently to shoot a game. It felt good for a very short period of time, and then I noticed that my finger tips were hurting on my right hand because the grip isn't large enough to prevent my finger tips from digging into the body. I truly believe comments like yours are made by people who simply have no need for the actual tool and yet criticize them as if you do. Stick a 300 f2.8 lens on a small body and shoot sports for 3 - 4 hours and get back to me.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 02:43 UTC
On Nikon D4s First Impressions Review preview (1048 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThomasSwitzerland: I am still a loyal customer of Nikon. But this uninspiring D4s confirms my move. Step by step I get rid of those old world huge cameras. They seem to me like dinosaurs from the past.

I do not want to bash because I believe in Nikon’s excellent sensors’ computer code and ergonomics. I also had the Canon FF cameras with L-lenses. I sold them at very good prices some time ago. I questioned more and more to hike in the mountains with those “tons” of black cases with a huge backpack limiting moves and fun.

Now I still got the D5200 – pros will smile – and mirrorless; and wait for the next generation of cellphone/integrated cameras to migrate to. It’s like with the stock markets. Buy early and sell into the last waves.

In a couple of years, no one can imagine that we took photos with those huge, heavy, and strange looking cameras.

Sometimes it is decision point to liberate. Less load is more joy. More joy and dedication produce better pictures.

@ HowaboutRAW ........ Sorry, sarcasm intended. My point to the OP is that every product is obviously not made for every situation. It's absurd to complain about the size of a full blown pro product when using it for anything but its intended purpose. I bought my 17 year old daughter a D5200 and recently used it to shoot a basketball game with my 70-200 f2.8. Never again. My hand cramped up in about 30 minutes. The thought of mounting my 300 f2.8 on it ....... mmmmmm. Give me big and useful over tiny and cramped any day.

Oh and I don't have a Beetle either. Ram 1500 4 x 4 here. Great truck ....... but I still can't compete with a 20 yard dump truck for some odd reason.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 28, 2014 at 03:48 UTC
On Nikon D4s First Impressions Review preview (1048 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThomasSwitzerland: I am still a loyal customer of Nikon. But this uninspiring D4s confirms my move. Step by step I get rid of those old world huge cameras. They seem to me like dinosaurs from the past.

I do not want to bash because I believe in Nikon’s excellent sensors’ computer code and ergonomics. I also had the Canon FF cameras with L-lenses. I sold them at very good prices some time ago. I questioned more and more to hike in the mountains with those “tons” of black cases with a huge backpack limiting moves and fun.

Now I still got the D5200 – pros will smile – and mirrorless; and wait for the next generation of cellphone/integrated cameras to migrate to. It’s like with the stock markets. Buy early and sell into the last waves.

In a couple of years, no one can imagine that we took photos with those huge, heavy, and strange looking cameras.

Sometimes it is decision point to liberate. Less load is more joy. More joy and dedication produce better pictures.

Have you seen those huge dump trucks on the road carrying all that sand and gravel??? I mean who wants to drive that thing around all day. I have a VW Beetle and drive to the store once a week to get groceries and it's just fine. Oh and occasionally I go to Wal Mart and buy a bag of sand .......... so I can carry sand just like they do; so why would I want that huge dump truck???

Direct link | Posted on Feb 27, 2014 at 03:12 UTC
On Roundup: Digital Cameras for Kids article (64 comments in total)
In reply to:

jkoch2: A submersible, drop-resistant smart phone is probably the only "camera" a typical kid would want or need. If nothing else, a smart phone can be used for gaming, which an old man's camera cannot.

Anything else would probably soon be lost, broken, soaked, swiped, swapped for other goodies, or (most likely) spend most of its time on a shelf. Any supposed advantage of a traditional mono-use "brick" camera, in terms of image quality, is irrelevant if most photos are casual shots of friends seen on a 3" screen, and merit 2 seconds of attention, at most.

There may be exceptions. Maybe, somewhere, there is a 15 year-old who dreams of getting a DSLR or an Oldsmobile station wagon for the next birthday.

King Penguin, I'm right there with you. I recently bought my 16 year old daughter a Nikon D5200 with 18-105mm lens, Rode Videomic Pro, and Manfrotto fluid video head. She mainly shoots videos, but also uses it for her serious stills. She also has a Nikon 35mm f1.8 lens, a Rokinon 8mm fisheye, Tamron 90mm macro, and borrows my 17-55 f2.8 and 85mm f1.4 lens fairly often. She had a Nikon D5000 that I got her about 2 years ago but the 5200 has better video output; so I thought it was worth the upgrade and she was of course thrilled. I'm very happy that she's willing to spend the extra time and effort to get a quality product from her SLR as opposed to taking the easy way out with her PS, iPhone, Ipad, etc. In fact she's turning it into a business of sorts as she gets paid all the time to make videos for kid's school projects, birthday parties, etc. There's still hope for our youth to embrace quality over ease of use!!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 26, 2013 at 02:17 UTC
In reply to:

Zvonimir Tosic: And when Nikon introduced V1, many spewed on it. Same sensor, same resolving power. Pity the resolving power of the brain of today journalism is at its all TIME low.

@kucink132 - I just read your comments history. You either work for Sony and have been asked to specifically target the Nikon 1 system, or you're 16. I had a long night and needed some humor this morning and this snip-it from one of your comments especially provided it.

"still, nikon 1 is unjustified huge for such tiny sensor.............. But RX100 is incredibly small for such relatively large sensor".

Direct link | Posted on Nov 3, 2012 at 15:23 UTC
On Canon issues allergy warning for EOS 650D/Rebel T4i article (176 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joo Prates: The problem is the greed of big companies that cut costs, by using bad material, to make more money. It is incomprehensible that a company like Canon put defective, or in this case, dangerous products on the market. Perhaps they transferred people from quality control to costs control. I am a Canon customer for years but I think is inadmissible the use of bad materials in such products, to save a few cents. And it is true that these problems are happening more and more, because the millions in profits are not enough…
"wash your hands with water if they have come in contact with the rubber grip"...it seems that to grab a camera is like playing with poisonous substances. whatch out ! wash your hands.

Wow. Really? First of all we haven't been told what caused the problem. For you to attack Canon like this shows your political leanings and exposes you as a person with an agenda totally unrelated to the topic. I've spent 25 years in design and manufacturing and I can assure you the problem is rarely "saving a few cents" as you suggest. Sometimes it's some type of machine malfunction and sometimes it's people that simply didn't do their job correctly. And yes sometimes we engineers simply made a mistake in the design. So you've never made a mistake at work? Really?

Comments like yours demonstrate a complete lack of understanding of fundamental manufacturing processes and are therefore not relavent in an intelligent conversation.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 11, 2012 at 01:28 UTC
On Samsung releases 12MP EX2F 'Smart Camera' article (370 comments in total)
In reply to:

MrTritium: I don’t find the EX2 aperture range that impressive.

Sure f1.4 at 24mm is a breakthrough, but f2.7 at 80mm falls behind the Olympus XZ1 which still gives you f2.2 at 85mm. And The Oly can still go to 105mm f2.5, while the EX2 stops at 80mm.

I didn’t find the full EX2 aperture vs focal length data, but I assume that the Olympus lens becomes brighter above ~50mm approx.

Anonymous Gerbil, I can't even begin to agree with your contention that starting at 35mm would be better. I hate generalizations, but I'll bet 90% of people would be better off with more on the wide end than the long end for PS. How many times have we heard people say to a group, "Get closer; I can't back up anymore"?.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 5, 2012 at 17:26 UTC
Total: 7, showing: 1 – 7